The Royal Mail share price looks cheap, but I’m not buying yet

first_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Enter Your Email Address Image source: Getty Images. The Royal Mail (LSE: RMG) share price has plunged over the past few weeks. The stock has fallen 44% from the six-month high of 250p reached in mid-December.After these declines, shares in the postal service are trading one of the lowest levels in history. That makes the Royal Mail share price look cheap at first glance.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…However, from a fundamental perspective, the stock continues to look expensive.Falling profitsThe coronavirus crisis is having a considerable impact on Royal Mail. While the service is still operating on a day-to-day basis, the general drop in business activity will have an impact on revenues.At this stage, it is unclear how significant the hit to revenues will ultimately be. Nevertheless, City analysts have pencilled in a 90% decline in earnings for 2021.The company has been struggling with falling revenues for years. And the latest crisis has only compounded this problem suggesting the outlook for the Royal Mail share price is bleak.Right now, the stock is trading at a 2021 P/E of 49. Historically, the shares have changed hands for around 10 times earnings. A return to this level could see the stock fall a further 80% from current levels.This is the worst-case scenario. If the economy recovers quickly from the crisis later this year, profits could come in above expectations.But it seems as if the crisis has only accelerated the trend Royal Mail has been fighting for some time. People simply aren’t sending letters any more, and the coronavirus crisis has forced many companies that were still using this medium to abandon it and use emails instead.If this solution works, it’s unlikely these businesses will go back to snail mail when the crisis is over.Avoid the Royal Mail share price In other words, it looks as if Royal Mail’s growth days could be behind it. That’s terrible news for the Royal Mail share price.A dividend cut looks likely as well. Based on current projections, dividend cover will fall to 0.25 next year. This suggests the payout will have to fall by 75% to remain sustainable.All of the above implies about the outlook for the Royal Mail share price is bleak. Earnings are crumbling, and it is impossible to tell if they will ever recover. It certainly looks as if the trend is away from physical mail.That’s going to be bad news for the company in the long run.As such, while the share price looks cheap after recent declines, it might be best to avoid the stock.If earnings continue to fall, it is highly likely that the shares will fall further as well. On top of this, it does not look as if the company’s dividend is sustainable at current levels.All in all, there are better opportunities out there than Royal Mail. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Rupert Hargreaves | Saturday, 18th April, 2020 | More on: RMG Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool.center_img “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. The Royal Mail share price looks cheap, but I’m not buying yet Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. See all posts by Rupert Hargreaveslast_img read more

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Interfaith push to fix Affordable Care Act church-specific glitch

first_img By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 26, 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Lisa Hlass says: Doug Desper says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH F WILLIAM THEWALT says: September 26, 2013 at 5:52 pm quote/Armstrong said that “exceedingly few” Medical Trust participants pay all or the majority of their health insurance premiums. “In fact, most employers pay all or the majority of single healthcare coverage for both clergy and lay employees, which is why so few would qualify for premium tax credits under current [federal] guidance.”…The Church Pension Group estimates that about 6% of clergy and 16% of lay employees currently enrolled in The Episcopal Church Medical Trust’s plans would qualify for a “meaningful premium tax credit if the Act were passed,” Frank Armstrong, senior vice president and chief actuary for the Church Pension Group, told ENS in a written response to e-mailed questions./unquoteI’m confused. Are these employees that would be affected by The Church Health Plan Act of 2013? If so, then why isn’t this like the special tax treatment requested by the AFL-CIO?quote/“Should the Church Health Plan Act of 2013 not pass, some employees of The Episcopal Church will lose some financial incentive to enroll in health plans that are tailored specifically for their profession,” she added, such as a special Medical Trust benefit to cover participation in “colleague groups” facilitated by clergy and licensed church counselors who work with church employees to address vocational and professional pressures./unquoteAgain, I’m confused. Are these examples of employees that currently participate in the denomination plan but who pay most or all of the premium themselves? Is this the only group in the Episcopal Church that the act would apply to? Does the denomination want to keep them in its plan for its own interest or because it is looking out for this group’s interests? Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR David Carr says: Ann Fontaine says: James Trager says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Interfaith push to fix Affordable Care Act church-specific glitch Church backs effort to help some employees get premium tax credits Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN September 26, 2013 at 8:56 pm This is just one more example of the hastily and secretly created Obamacare gone wrong.There will be countless others because senators and representatives were not given copies of the bill that was crafted behind closed doors in the black of night. Under such conditions, it is impossible to craft a decent bill, let alone a workable one. Let’s face it, Obama’s signature piece of legislation is currently a flop and will only get worse with time. -F. W. Thewalt Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT October 2, 2013 at 1:21 pm Amen brother! Tags September 27, 2013 at 6:33 pm I agree with F. Williams and James Trager. Why did THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH give the heads up and want the Obamacare to pass in the first place. Now, I hope those who wanted this bill to pass in the first place have learned their lesson, read it before you give your approval!!!!! Jayce, you didn’t get EVERY Episcopalian’s vote on whether to back this bill or not. I know many, many Episcopalian’s who are not happy with Obamacare and they would not have wanted THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH to endorse it. So, I guess, you reap what you sow. Ecumenical & Interreligious, Health & Healthcare Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Faith & Politics, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY September 27, 2013 at 9:04 am I’m disappointed, too. When I saw the title of this article, I thought maybe the Episcopal Church was making a concerted effort to lobby for low income folks who have not been able to afford health insurance. Seems reasonable that as followers of Jesus Christ we would be advocating for those who are poor. We have plenty of lobbyists and powerful congress people advocating for middle and high and obnoxiously high income folks. Let’s not imitate our current societal norm of making sure “I get mine,” and try to follow Christ’s mandate of advocating for those who have very little and who have no voice. John B. Chilton says: September 28, 2013 at 10:26 am I am no expert, but didn’t The Episcopal Church support this bill? Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Karen Birr says: September 27, 2013 at 10:00 pm Endorsements (or sympathetic soft-ball support) for questionable decisions is nothing new from some leaders these days. I recall fondness in ENS for the disgraceful flop TV series “The Book of Daniel” that featured a radically inclusive and very confused Episcopal priest. That kind of priest made as much sense to the American viewing public as that kind of priest does to 60% of our membership who will stay home this Sunday. Then there was the inordinate attention week after week for the whole Occupy movement until it largely discredited itself. The AFL-CIO turned its back on ObamaCare and the union stated that it was misled and that the ACA is nothing but a job killer. A 40,000-strong longshoremen union quit the AFL-CIO because of their blind obedience to all things liberal Democrat. I agree with Chief Justice Roberts. Elections have consequences. The Church’s advocates willfully and with little question endorsed it. Live with it like the rest of us. Rector Smithfield, NC center_img September 27, 2013 at 11:22 am I recall that when ObamaCare was before Congress, the Episcopal Church promptly officially endorsed it. At the time I wondered whether anyone had read the bill. I think we now have the answer. The lesson is that the Episcopal Church should not endorse legislation outside its sphere of competence. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Robert Ricker says: Rector Shreveport, LA September 26, 2013 at 4:24 pm Sounds like every other business trying to get special status in the ACA – disappointed in CPG. Read more here. http://www.episcopalcafe.com/lead/episcopal_church/do_unions_and_denominations_wa.html Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Marsha Wilkins says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ October 2, 2013 at 1:23 pm The church hierarchy, i.e., the very liberal Presiding Bishop, did. I, a rank and file Episcopalian, did not support Obamacare. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ann Zuvekas says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel October 3, 2013 at 11:37 pm Armstrong said that “exceedingly few” Medical Trust participants pay all or the majority of their health insurance premiums. “In fact, most employers pay all or the majority of single healthcare coverage for both clergy and lay employees, which is why so few would qualify for premium tax credits under current [federal] guidance.”I agree with the 2 Annes. If very few episcopal clergy and layman would qualify for the tax credits, why is this a big deal. The ACA is not universal healthcare. It is for people who didn’t qualify for insurance because of pre- existing conditions and for those who don’t get health insurance through their employer and can’t afford it on their own. As a teacher I was paying $90.00 for my insurance, which is pretty good. I am not looking for a tax credit. I can afford $90.00 a month. It is so sad to see “Christians” begrudge others help. My goodness, this doesn’t say much for some in the Episcopal church. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (12) Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA David Carr says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ September 26, 2013 at 4:42 pm I agree with Ms. Fontaine. Why should the CPG be treated any differently from any other employer? They admit that the problem would apply only to a few low-income employees, who could then opt out and buy plans on the exchanges with subsidies. Or, we Episcopalians could begin charity at home and do WWJD for our lower-income staff members. Shame! Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Comments are closed. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] As Congress continues to fight over the Affordable Care Act, the Church Pension Group and the Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations are urging legislators to pass a bill to rectify what they see as a church-related glitch in law.The Affordable Care Act is meant to make preventive health care — including family planning and related services — more obtainable for uninsured Americans.Currently low- and middle-income individuals and families who are not otherwise eligible for affordable public- or employer-sponsored coverage will be able to apply for subsidies in the form of tax credits to help them buy private health insurance through newly established health insurance exchanges. Enrollment in the plans those exchanges offer is due to begin Oct. 1 and coverage and subsidies begin in January.However, according to the law and its current implementing rules, unlike most health plans, church health plans may not offer their plans on state or federal health insurance exchanges. Thus income-eligible clergy and lay enrollees in church health plans do not have access to those tax credits based on their premiums.The Church Pension Group and the Office of Government Relations support The Church Health Plan Act of 2013 (Senate Bill 1164), which would allow eligible employees to continue to purchase insurance through church plans and have access to the same premium tax credits available to employees who purchase coverage from for-profit health plans through the exchanges, also known as the Health Insurance Marketplace.However, the bill does not give special tax treatment for clergy and lay employees who are eligible for the credits as the AFL-CIO recently requested for its members. The labor federation wants multiemployer union health plans to have access to the premium tax credits, and also maintain the tax-free treatment of contributions to their health plans, a benefit not otherwise provided to individuals who receive the premium tax credits through the Marketplace. The Obama administration has denied the AFL-CIO request.The Church Pension Group estimates that about 6% of clergy and 16% of lay employees currently enrolled in The Episcopal Church Medical Trust’s plans would qualify for a “meaningful premium tax credit if the Act were passed,” Frank Armstrong, senior vice president and chief actuary for the Church Pension Group, told ENS in a written response to e-mailed questions.The Medical Trust provides a variety of healthcare coverage offerings to Episcopal clergy and lay employees. The Medical Trust administers these offerings, contracting with leading healthcare carriers (i.e., UnitedHealthcare) and paying them a fee to provide access to their provider networks and claim payment services.Armstrong noted that an employee can qualify for premium tax credits if he or she has household income between 100% and 400% of the Federal Poverty Level (about $24,000 to $94,000 per year for a family of four in 2014, according to information here.)In addition, they must be able to show that they do not have access to affordable health coverage through their employer. Coverage is defined as affordable when the required employee contribution for self-only coverage does not exceed 9.5% of household income. The employee would also have to purchase coverage through the health care exchanges and file a tax return (joint if married) to get the tax credit.Armstrong said that “exceedingly few” Medical Trust participants pay all or the majority of their health insurance premiums. “In fact, most employers pay all or the majority of single healthcare coverage for both clergy and lay employees, which is why so few would qualify for premium tax credits under current [federal] guidance.”Jayce Hafner, domestic policy analyst for the church’s Office of Government Relations, told Episcopal News Service that “it seems unfortunate that the Episcopal Church, an organization that worked so hard for the passage of the ACA, should be excluded from [all the] benefits of this law.”“Should the Church Health Plan Act of 2013 not pass, some employees of The Episcopal Church will lose some financial incentive to enroll in health plans that are tailored specifically for their profession,” she added, such as a special Medical Trust benefit to cover participation in “colleague groups” facilitated by clergy and licensed church counselors who work with church employees to address vocational and professional pressures.The church’s advocacy for universal access to health care dates to at least 1994 when the General Convention passed Resolution A057 , which in part put the church on record as believing that access to “quality, cost effective, health care services [ought to] be considered necessary for everyone in the population.”The Office of Government Relations sent a letter Sept. 26 to members of Congress urging passage of the Church Health Plan Act.The Church Pension Group has posted information about the proposed Church Health Plan Act and a sample letter on its website for participants to use to write their U.S. senators to urge them to support the bill.Two Democratic senators, Mark Pryor of Arkansas and Chris Coons of Delaware, introduced the Church Health Plan Act in June. Coons called the fix “a common sense issue.”The Church Alliance – a coalition of 37 church-benefit boards covering mainline Protestant denominations, two branches of Judaism, and Roman Catholic schools and institutions, which provide health care benefits for more than one million clergy and lay workers, also supports the Senate bill. The Episcopal Church belongs to the alliance.However, chances of the bill’s passage are tied up in the political in-fighting that surrounds the federal health-care law that opponents have dubbed “Obamacare.”“It’s a complicated scenario in Congress. Some members of Congress are recognizing that the ACA, while comprehensive and effective, needs some improvements and they are trying to iron out these kinks,” Hafner said. “However, there are other members of Congress who are strongly against the ACA, and would sooner keep the law the way it is and work to repeal it, rather than work to improve it. These actors are making it difficult for other members to update, enhance, and progress the ACA.”And on Sept. 12, in its 41st vote against all or parts of the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. House of Representatives passed No Subsidies Without Verification Act (H.R. 2775). The bill opposes a July regulation issued by the federal Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) giving state-run health insurance exchanges some flexibility when examining whether people are qualified for the insurance premium tax credits. Republicans say the flexibility will allow ineligible people to qualify for the credits and the Obama administration says the regulation is being misinterpreted. The act is expected to die in the Senate.Meanwhile, Republican majority leadership in the House of Representatives has said it is willing to shut down the federal government by refusing to grant it borrowing authority past the end of September unless the ACA is stripped of its funding. Again, it is unlikely that such a move would survive a vote in the Democrat-controlled Senate. On Sept. 25, the Senate made progress towards passing a version of the House bill that keeps the government open but does not remove funding for the ACA.Other possible impactsSome observers have predicted that if the tax credits are not extended to eligible clergy and lay employees, low- to middle-income clergy and lay employees will try to leave denominational plans and purchase coverage in the exchanges. Others have wondered if some employers will strongly suggest that they do so to relieve their own costs of providing coverage.“If an employee is able to provide certification that he or she qualifies for a premium tax credit, this would be considered an allowable [Denominational Health Plan] opt-out,” said CPG’s Armstrong, reiterating that the CPG thinks “exceedingly few” Episcopal Church clergy and lay employees will qualify for the credits.Armstrong noted that Episcopal Church Medical Trust participants who opt to buy coverage through the Marketplace will lose any employer contributions currently being made toward the cost of their insurance; and any premium payments made by the employee toward the Marketplace coverage cannot be made on a pre-tax basis.Plus, those people who are income-eligible would likely need to “buy up” in order to obtain a Marketplace plan that provides the same coverage the employee has now through the Denominational Health Plan, according to Armstrong. Most Medical Trust plans are classified as “gold” or “platinum” and also provide ancillary benefits such as vision coverage, employee assistance plans and health-advocate service but the premium tax credits will be based on the cost of the Marketplace “silver” plans.(A short explanation of the “metal levels” is here.)“There are other tax and financial consequences to consider as well,” Armstrong said. “We strongly suggest that each employee speak with a financial or tax advisor during the decision process.”Meanwhile, according to Armstrong, “the Medical Trust is not overly concerned about the potentiality of church employers urging their employees to opt out of the DHP in order to relieve the employer’s expenses” because of the anticipated small number of employees involved.“Furthermore, unlike for-profit companies, the Medical Trust has the church’s and our participants’ best interests at heart and we believe that church employers feel the same way,” he said.A related issue as the implementation of the Affordable Care Act approaches is a part of the law that allows employers with fewer than 50 full-time equivalent employees during a specific measurement period to stop offering health coverage to their employees without being penalized under the so-called Employer Shared Responsibility provision of the ACA. The Obama administration has delayed implementation of that provision until 2015.Armstrong said that eventual enactment of that provision would not supersede the canonical requirements of 2009 General Convention Resolution A177 which established the Denominational Health Plan and required health benefits to be provided to eligible clergy and lay employees.Read more about it* For more information on how the premium tax credits work, go to this part of the federal government’s HealthCare.gov website.* The Kaiser Family Foundation has a subsidy calculator here.* The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities has a frequently-asked-questions document about the premium tax credits here.* The Consumers’ Union has developed state-by-state brochures explaining how the tax credits work and how to qualify for them in each state. They are available here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

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The Shortball highlights wrap from Round 5 of Super Rugby

first_imgMonday Mar 16, 2015 The Shortball highlights wrap from Round 5 of Super Rugby Catch up on what went down in Round 5 of Super Rugby this past weekend, as the Shortball takes us through some try scoring highlights, then looks at the best of the bunch, shows us some of the biggest tackles of the round, and includes a wrestling move that probably shouldn’t be repeated.In fact Liam Gill has since been banned for two weeks for his flip, suplex clean out on Brumbies scrumhalf Nic White. It’s amusing to see, but he was yellow carded and has since been told that even though White landed safely, it’s considered illegal lifting. More on that soon.In Australia, catch Rugby HQ on Thursday, 8.30pm AEDT on Fox Sports 2ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Plays of the Week Related Articles 123 WEEKS AGO WATCH: France destroy Wales in Women’s Six… 138 WEEKS AGO Waikato winger scores four tries in epic… 304 WEEKS AGO The Wraparound from Rugby HQ – Week 27 From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items With A Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Breastfeeding mums find novel use for NCT’s new wristband

first_imgBreastfeeding mums find novel use for NCT’s new wristband The National Childbirth Trust reports that breastfeeding mothers are using its new charity wristband to help them remember which side to feed their baby on next.In the past mothers have used nappy pins, ribbons and many other items to help them remember which breast to offer to their baby next. NCT’s new lavender wristband has now joined that list of useful items, according to the charity and Lansinoh Laboratories, the makers of the band.Rosemary Dodds, Policy Research Officer at the NCT, said: “We are delighted that women have found another use for our wristbands… It only takes a few seconds to change the band from one wrist to the other and mums aren’t risking injury to themselves or their baby as they might do with a pin.” Advertisement  21 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img The wristband is sold for £1 via the NCT Sales website, with each band raising 70p for the cahrity’s breastfeeding counsellor services. Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Trading Howard Lake | 24 January 2006 | Newslast_img read more

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Variable Costs to Produce a Crop Steady but Overall it will…

first_img Total variable input costs for this year’s corn and soybean crops are likely to stay about the same as last year. Variable input costs are the costs of production like fuel, fertilizer and seed but don’t include fixed costs like cash rent. Alan Miller, a Purdue Extension farm business management specialist says costs this year are a mixed bag and some costs will go up.“We’re expecting that seed will be higher. Nitrogen fertilizer will definitely be a little bit higher, but there are going to be other things that offset that. One thing we’ve been talking about recently is crop insurance premiums and we are expecting that those actually will be down and so overall the ups and downs sort of cancel each other out. So for now it looks like the variable costs will be relatively stable. That’s the good news.”And yes, there is some bad news. Miller says that would be projected increases in those fixed costs.“You know things related to the cost of the land farmers use and the machinery. Those things are going up so I’ve got my corn fixed costs up 10 percent for average yield corn. I’ve got soybeans up 7 percent and so the total cost of producing these crops is more expensive.”Miller estimated seed costs per acre on average-yield farmland would increase by $8 for corn and $7 for soybeans. He says production challenges and resulting tight supplies factor into higher corn and soybean seed prices.“Commodity prices are relatively high so you can really see that in the seeds. When you look at those seeds like soybeans where the commodity itself is a larger percentage of the total cost of that seed, that’s probably the biggest driver. Then second is the challenge seed producers have had for at least the last two years in terms of actually producing seed. There was drought last year obviously but the year before wasn’t  a great year for producing seed in the Midwest and so the tighter supplies always lead to higher prices.”He adds diesel fuel prices will be down, but propane will be up slightly. Propane prices are forecast at $1.60 per gallon for the fall of 2013 and that is up 8 to 10 percent from the fall of 2012, but down significantly from the fall of 2011. Diesel fuel will be down a projected 2 to 3 percent from last year, according to the most recent U.S. Energy Information Administration forecast.“The state of the global economy and higher domestic oil and gas production are factors driving the forecast for diesel fuel prices,” Miller said.The rise in nitrogen fertilizer prices is attributable to tight supplies and transportation problems and there could be an increase of about 2 to 5 percent over last year’s already pricey nitrogen fertilizers, such as urea, liquid nitrogen (28 percent), or anhydrous ammonia.But some nitrogen price relief could be on the horizon as the domestic fertilizer industry considers expanding production capacity to take advantage of abundant supplies of relatively cheap natural gas in the U.S., Miller said.The price of another common fertilizer – potash – is down about 8 percent from last January because of abundant North American supplies. Those prices are expected to remain stable into planting season.Phosphate fertilizer prices, while down almost 4 percent from last January, are expected to increase as spring planting season approaches.“Ammonium phosphate products account for a large part of the phosphate fertilizer market in the U.S.,” Miller said. “Phosphate prices are expected to increase 1-3 percent into the spring of 2013 as suppliers rebuild inventories, and due to the influence of nitrogen in phosphate products.”Prices paid for chemicals, such as fungicides, herbicides and insecticides, are expected to hold fairly steady, Miller said.The decline in crop insurance premiums could reach 4 to 5 percent in 2013 and interest rates remain flat and relatively low in Purdue’s variable cost estimates for 2013.[audio:https://www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2013/02/Purdue-2013-crop-cost-projections.mp3|titles=Purdue 2013 crop cost projections]Source: Purdue Ag Communications SHARE Facebook Twitter SHARE By Andy Eubank – Feb 7, 2013 Variable Costs to Produce a Crop Steady but Overall it will Cost More in 2013 Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Variable Costs to Produce a Crop Steady but Overall it will Cost… Previous articleCan Indiana Farmers Adapt to Climate Change?Next articleSeed Consultants Market Watch 2/8/2013 10:52 update Gary Wilhelmi Andy Eubanklast_img read more

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Metropolitan Mayor from Tipperary happy to call Limerick home

first_imgLinkedin Previous article‘Forgiveness’ will be key to Keary’s mayoraltyNext articleSeven seats remain in new boundary shake-up Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie WhatsApp TAGSCllr Sean LynchCllr Vivienne CrowleyFianna FáillimerickLimerick City and County CouncilLimerick Metropolitan District WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Twitter Facebook Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live NewsLocal NewsMetropolitan Mayor from Tipperary happy to call Limerick homeBy Alan Jacques – June 29, 2017 2097 center_img Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Print Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Email Sean LynchSean Lynch“IT’S a long way to Tipperary,” … or so the old song goes.But one thing is certain, the heart of Limerick’s new Metropolitan Mayor, Sean Lynch, does not lie in the Premier County.Speaking after his election to the post last Friday evening at City Hall, the retired Tipperary-born Garda detective firmly placed his allegiance to the green and white of the Limerick flag.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “I happily call Limerick my home,” the Patrickswell resident admitted proudly.“After 27 years as a Garda detective the worst days are, thankfully, in the rearview mirror as Limerick powers ahead. The view keeps getting better and better,” Mayor Lynch said.“We still have much to do and many people to reach but a solid foundation is there and we are not far off at the moment being a city where everyone who wants a job will get a job.”And in a perfect show of his ‘good cop/bad cop’ sides, the Fianna Fail politician then made it perfectly clear to local representatives that he would throw the book at them if they get of hand in the council chambers in the coming year.Showing the firm hand of the law, he pointed out that a code of dress and punctuality would be followed under his rule as chairperson.24-year-old Vivienne Crowley was also elected as Deputy Mayor for the Metropolitan District.Independent councillor Frankie Daly congratulated her on the new post.“You come from fine stock and the breeding in you is exceptional,” he said.“I am not a horse,” Cllr Crowley quickly replied.by Alan [email protected] Advertisementlast_img read more

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Pike County Schools honor teachers of the year

first_imgThe Teachers of the Year 2020-2021 for Pike County Schools were recognized at the system’s in-service day on January 4. Dr. Mark Bazzell, superintendent of Pike County Schools, congratulated the award recipients for their dedication and outstanding contributions. Pictured from left, Coretta Gholston, Katie Miller, Chris McVay, Tina Senn and Catherine Jackson. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Print Article Book Nook to reopen Sponsored Content Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Pike County Schools recognized the system’s Teachers of the Year for the school year 2020-2021 at the system’s in-service day on January 4.Dr. Mark Bazzell, superintendent of Pike County Schools, congratulated system’s Teachers of the Year: Catherine Jackson, second grade teacher at Banks; Katie Miller, sixth-grade teacher at Goshen Elementary; Tina Senn, pre-K at Pike County Elementary; Chris McVay, English teacher at Goshen High School; and Coretta Gholston, English teacher at Pike County High School.Bazzell said it is a special honor for teachers to be selected by their peers as outstanding educators. He expressed appreciation to the Teachers of the Year for their dedication to Pike County Schools and its students By The Penny Hoarder By Jaine Treadwell Testing concerns grow as state hospitalizations hit record high As the New Year 2021 dawned on Monday, Troy Regional Medical Center was experiencing a shortage of supplies for in-house… read more The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Patriot Health ZoneHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancelcenter_img Latest Stories Email the author The winners on the district level will then compete in the Sweet 16 competition from which state winners will be selected on both the elementary and secondary levels. Next UpDr. Donnella Carter, Pike County Schools deputy superintendent, joined Bazzell in congratulating the recipients of the 2020-2021 Pike County Schools Teachers of the Year awards.Carter said the administrative staff of Pike County Schools takes great pride in all its teachers but has special congratulations reserved for those who are recognized as Teachers of the Year and in the unprecedented year school year 2020-2021.Carter said each school had the opportunity to select a teacher who has been outstanding in the classroom and in his or her dedication to the students, to the school and to education as a whole. “And at Pike County Schools, we also recognize system-wide Teachers of the Year for the elementary and high school levels,” Carter said. “We congratulate Catherine Jackson as the system’s Elementary School Teacher of the Year and Coretta Gholston as the system’s Secondary School Teacher of the Year.“All our Teachers of the Year are very deserving of this honor and thank them for their dedication and outstanding contributions to education. We wish Catherine Jackson and Coretta Gholston all the best as they advance to the district level of the State of Alabama Teachers of the Year program. We know they will represent Pike County Schools well.” Published 6:52 pm Tuesday, January 5, 2021 You Might Like Pike County Schools honor teachers of the year Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Daylast_img read more

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FBI pleads for help after 13-year-old Hania Aguilar’s body found: ‘We have to find out how she died and who did this to her’

first_imgFBI Charlotte(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — The body of abducted 13-year-old Hania Aguilar was believed to be recovered this week in North Carolina but the search for answers is far from over.“We have to find out how she died and who did this to her,” Andy de la Rocha of the FBI said in a statement Wednesday. “We have to bring the person responsible to justice.”A body believed to be Hania, who was kidnapped in Lumberton at the beginning of the month, was found in a body of water in Robeson County on Tuesday, authorities announced Wednesday.Investigative leads had prompted authorities to search that area for the missing girl, according to the FBI.But the FBI is now asking the public for tips on when and how the body was left there.Anyone with surveillance cameras near Wire Grass Road in Robeson County is asked to call the tip line at 910-272-5871.Authorities do not have a person of interest, according to the FBI.Hania was kidnapped outside her home at the Rosewood Mobile Home Park in Lumberton, North Carolina, on the morning of Nov. 5.She had taken the keys to her aunt’s SUV to start the car before school when a man dressed in all black with a yellow bandanna over his face forced her in the car and drove away, police said. The stolen SUV was found three days later in Lumberton.Lumberton Police Chief Michael McNeill said he was “devastated” to make the “heart-wrenching” announcement Wednesday that the recovered body was believed to be Hania’s.“I wish we had a different outcome for Hania’s family,” he said at a Wednesday news conference.An autopsy will determine her cause of death, the chief said.McNeill did not discuss the condition of the body.The state medical examiner’s preliminary tests indicated the body is Hania but final confirmation will be made through dental records, McNeill added.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Bryant to declare for the 2018 NBA Draft, will hire an agent

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPROVO, Utah – Former BYU guard Elijah Bryant announced today he will declare for the 2018 NBA Draft and hire an agent. By hiring an agent, Bryant forfeits his senior season of collegiate eligibility.“We want to thank Elijah for all of his hard work, dedication and commitment to this team and our program,” BYU coach Dave Rose said. “Over the last three years, he was not only a great player and leader on the court but represented the university and our program in a way that made us all proud. We wish him the very best as he pursues his childhood dream of becoming a professional basketball player.”Bryant announced his intentions to pursue a professional career on Wednesday via his YouTube channel. Click here to see the video.A 6-foot-5, 210-pound guard, Bryant was a first-team All-West Coast Conference player and earned NABC All-District 9 First Team honors in 2017-18. He helped lead the Cougars to 24 wins while averaging a team-high 18.2 points and adding 6.3 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.3 steals per game. Bryant also posted impressive shooting percentages of 49.4 from the field, 41.5 from 3-point range and 85.0 from the free-throw line.As a sophomore in 2016-17, the Gwinnett, Georgia, native averaged 11.7 points and 3.6 rebounds for the Cougars. Prior to coming to BYU, Bryant played his freshman season at Elon in 2014-15 where he averaged 14.2 points, 4.2 rebounds and 2.7 assists and was named the Colonial Athletic Conference Rookie of the Year. Robert Lovell Tags: Basketball/BYU Cougars/Elijah Bryant/NBA Draft Written by April 19, 2018 /Sports News – Local Bryant to declare for the 2018 NBA Draft, will hire an agentlast_img read more

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Future destroyer USS John Finn completes first sea trials

first_img Authorities September 5, 2016 Future US Navy destroyer ‘John Finn’ completes first set of sea trials View post tag: HII Back to overview,Home naval-today Future US Navy destroyer ‘John Finn’ completes first set of sea trials View post tag: USS John Finn View post tag: US Navy The future U.S. Navy guided missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG 113) completed initial builder’s sea trials on August 30 following three days at sea.The Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) ship, built at HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division, spent three days in the Gulf of Mexico testing the ship’s main propulsion system and other ship systems.DDG 113 is planned to return to sea later next month for a second round of sea trials prior to a third underway period with members of the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey.During this underway period, many of the ship’s systems were tested to demonstrate that they are installed properly and are operational. John Finn successfully conducted a full power run and demonstrated key communication, damage control, and navigation systems as well as various hull, mechanical and electrical, and propulsion applications.The ship is 509 feet in length, has a waterline beam of 59 feet, and a navigational draft of 31 feet. According to the Navy, four gas turbine engines will power the ship to speeds in excess of 30 knots.“The DDG 51 program has been the backbone of our shipyard for nearly three decades,” said Ingalls Shipbuilding president Brian Cuccias. “Getting DDG 113 underway is a significant milestone in this program, and we are looking forward to continuing our legacy of building these quality, complex ships for our U.S. Navy customer.”Ingalls has delivered 28 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. Other destroyers currently under construction at Ingalls include Ralph Johnson (DDG 114), Paul Ignatius (DDG 117), Delbert D. Black (DDG 119) and Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG 121). Construction on Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123) is scheduled to begin in the second quarter of 2017. Share this articlelast_img read more

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