New Program Brings Peritoneal Dialysis Home

first_imgNot all Nova Scotians who need dialysis will have to travel to a hospital for treatments. Beginning July 1, a new provincial program will offer continuing-care clients with renal failure the option to have dialysis treatments in their homes and at designated long-term-care facilities. “Today, many dialysis patients must travel to the hospital, three times a week, to receive hemodialysis treatments on someone else’s schedule,” said Health Minister Chris d’Entremont. “This new option gives some the freedom that comes with getting the treatment they need in the comfort and privacy of their own homes.” Peritoneal dialysis is a well-established alternative to traditional hemodialysis. In hemodialysis, blood is passed through an artificial-kidney machine to be cleaned. Peritoneal dialysis uses a similar filtration process, but the blood is cleaned inside the body rather than in a machine. This form of dialysis can be performed in the home or in the community, reducing the need for patients to travel, or relocate, to be closer to hospitals. Less invasive and less expensive, peritoneal dialysis is, in many cases, better suited to elderly and disabled patients. It improves blood-pressure control, preserves remaining kidney function and expands dietary options. Combined with the fact that patients do not need to leave home for treatment, peritoneal dialysis often improves overall quality of life. There are about 95 peritoneal dialysis patients in the province; 10 per cent of those patients are continuing-care clients. Based on health and population trends, it is expected demand for dialysis-treatment options will increase. Peritoneal dialysis will be available to continuing-care clients with renal failure through home-care service providers. It will also be available in one long-term-care home in each health district across the province. The new peritoneal dialysis program makes services already available in some areas of the province available to eligible continuing-care clients across Nova Scotia. Continuing-care clients who require dialysis can call 1-800-225-7225 (out of province 1-902-424-4288), any day of the week between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. for more information on peritoneal dialysis services. The Continuing Care Strategy is a 10-year plan to enhance and expand Nova Scotia’s continuing-care system. By building on community support, increasing local solutions and ensuring care options are available when and where they are needed, the strategy aims to create a system that supports Nova Scotians in their desire to live well in a place they can call home. A peritoneal dialysis patient is available for interview upon request. For more information see the website at www.gov.ns.ca/health/ccs/ccs_strategy .last_img read more

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Womens basketball How Ohio State is replacing the injured Stephanie Mavungas contributions

OSU then-junior forward Shayla Cooper (32) during a game against Nebraska on Feb. 18 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Lantern File PhotoRedshirt junior forward Stephanie Mavunga has been an integral part of the Ohio State women’s basketball team’s success. However, with the Buckeyes’ second-leading scorer and leading rebounder sidelined with a foot injury, OSU is using many different players, both in the starting lineup and on the bench, to make up for the production lost for the foreseeable future.In her first season playing for OSU after transferring from North Carolina after her sophomore season, Mavunga is second on the team, averaging 11.8 points per game while leading the team, and ranked sixth nationally, with 11.3 rebounds per game.According to McGuff, the season that Mavunga is having with OSU does not come very often.“It’s not easy to average a double-double,” McGuff said. “It takes a lot of work and effort. Another thing that she does is run the floor. She puts a lot of pressure on other teams’ post players to get back and I think that really wears on the other team as the game goes on. She’s doing a great job.”Mavunga stressed the importance of having a “big” as the anchor of the defensive front.“I think size is key,” she said. “That is something that lacked last year and the previous years before that. I think that size is key both defensively and offensively. Defensively especially, because there’s other really big girls in the NCAA Tournament and in the Big Ten itself, so I think that that’s key in terms of defending other teams’ post players. Also, on the offensive end, it helps in rebounding and shot attempts as well, so you can have a shot over other people maybe that are smaller than you or at least easier to do that.”With Mavunga out of the starting lineup and her game being very important to the team’s overall game plan, OSU had to find players to replace her production in the paint. After being outrebounded by Iowa by three on Feb. 12, the Buckeyes were back to dominating the paint, out-rebounding Nebraska by 11 with the forwards — freshman Tori McCoy, redshirt sophomore Makayla Waterman, junior Alexa Hart and senior Shayla Cooper — combining for 25 of the 45 team rebounds.With the loss of Mavunga, junior guard Kelsey Mitchell said that she and her teammates are going to have to continue to step up in the paint to get those rebounds.“Being able to kind of get that back and knowing that, with her absence, it’s going to be a little bit more difficult, we just have to take the people we do have and tell them to buy in to it,” she said. “There were a couple of changes that needed to be made in how important it was that (Mavunga) was getting rebounds and now it’s a lot more important that we kind of bounce back and get that same kind of vibe that we did have.”Even though she cannot play, Mavunga is making an impact, giving players, like McCoy, different tips on how to defend her position during the game.“Basically, she is just telling me to keep running the floor and post up hard and every time I have the chance,” McCoy said. “She is always telling me to do that and it’s actually helping. I listened to her in the last game we just played.”Even when Mavunga was on the court, she gave her teammates an example on how to play the game.“(McCoy’s) energy and her intensity really is contagious to our team and how hard she goes in the paint really effects how hard we play,” redshirt junior guard Linnae Harper said. “She’s a great asset to the team and that’s one reason why our team is getting better because it’s somebody on our team that can make other people better.”However, until Mavunga is ready to get back onto the court, the rebounding game will have to be a team effort.“It’s important that we have all three of (the forwards) in the paint and the rest of the guards, too. All of us,” Mitchell said. read more

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Meshkov Brest and PPD Zagreb to play in SEHA F4 semifinals

Meshkov Brest and PPD Zagreb qualified for the SEHA F4 semi-finals after the two opening matches of the regional competition final event in Veszprem Arena. In the first match of the day Belarussian champions beat RK Nexe 28:24 (11:11) after better performance in the second half. The first gunner in the winning team was Kamyshyk with eight goals.STATISTICSMeshkov Brest will meet RK Vardar Skopje in the battle for the final – on Friday.PPD Zagreb showed another TOP performance on the wings of fantastic matches in the VELUX EHF Champions League. Veselin Vujovic boys overplayed HC Tatran Presov 33:26 (16:10) in front of more than 2.500 fans in Veszprem Arena. Only the TOP scorer of the SEHA GSS, Radoslav Antl with 11 goals was on the level necessary to play against Croatian champions, who had Luka Stepancic with 6 goals in the best shooting form tonight…STATISTICSZagreb will meet home team MVM MKB Veszprem on Friday’s semi-final. SEHA ← Previous Story EHF Cup quarter-finals: Skjern attack Melsungen for Berlin’s ticket Next Story → Steiner Ege is new “Zebra” read more

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