Chelsea v West Ham line-ups: Terry back in three Chelsea changes, Hammers striker returns

first_imgJohn Terry makes his first Chelsea start in five weeks as one of three changes to the line-up that lost at Everton last week.Terry’s return means Branislav Ivanovic reverts to right-back and Cesar Azpilicueta switches back to left-back, with Kenedy pushed into a more advanced role.With Diego Costa suspended, Loic Remy gets the nod up front for his first home league start of the season.Oscar comes in to midfield as Nemanja Matic and Pedro drop out.West Ham also make three changes, after the 1-1 draw at Manchester United last time out.Adrian returns in goal, after Darren Randolph played in the FA Cup, while Emmanuel Emenike and Andy Carroll drop to the bench.Enner Valencia starts a league game for the first time since 13 February, while Diafra Sakho plays up front.Chelsea: Courtois; Ivanovic, Cahill, Terry,Azpilicueta; Mikel, Fabregas; Willian, Oscar, Kenedy; Remy. Subs: Begovic, Baba, Matic, Loftus-Cheek, Pedro, Traore, Pato.West Ham United: Adrian; Antonio, Reid, Ogbonna, Cresswell; Kouyate, Noble; Lanzini, Payet, Valencia; Sakho.Subs: Randolph, Oxford, O’Brien, Obiang, Song, Emenike, Carroll.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Continue reading

South Africa’s first mobile agri-lab

first_img11 September 2013 South Africa’s first mobile agricultural laboratory, one of the most technologically advanced in the world, will be a major boost for the country’s emerging farmers, enabling them to have their water, soil and animals tested on their doorstep. The Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) spent R3-million on the development of the laboratory, which was recently launched by non-governmental organisation Mobile Agri Skills Development and Training (MASTD) at the Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport outside Nelspruit. “The benefits of the lab are numerous and include bringing conformity assessment support closer to emerging farmers, giving them access to a testing facility that will help them in their farm planning and crop production,” Seda spokesperson Beverley Kgame said this week. Project manager Kevin Gambaran said the lab, with its cutting edge-range of equipment, “is definitely the most advanced agricultural laboratory in the country, and we are very proud to launch it after years of hard work”. In addition to laboratory facilities, the 20-metre Scania truck unit hosts a training facility with high-tech electronic equipment and a comprehensive one-stop support centre for small, medium and micro enterprises within the agriculture industry. Two high-definition television screens on the outside of the truck relay what is going on inside, and all laboratory equipment, barring the air-conditioners, are run with solar power. “There is an interactive training room on board and a top-of-the-range computer where research and analysis can be furthered,” Gambaran said. MASTD chairman Mathews Phosa said the laboratory would “strengthen MASTD’s hand in accelerating the growth of emerging farmers into commercial producers and beyond”. The truck adds to a fleet of MASTD vehicles which visit projects and deliver seedlings and mechanisation to farmers across the country. MASTD managing director Lynette Bezuidenhout, who leads a team of 30 full-time professionals at the NGO, said the lab would also be used for educational purposes. “The plan is also to support rural schools by taking the laboratory unit to them and demonstrating experiments by using the television screens, making students aware of basic agri-science and showing that agriculture is a worthwhile profession.” Bezuidenhout said more than 300 people were involved in the construction of the laboratory, which was hand-created and custom-made. Phosa, the former premier of Mpumalanga province, said that such developments were vital for South Africa’s economy given the dwindling number of commercial farmers in the country. “Many African and East European countries continue to lure farmers with extremely lucrative contracts. More worrying is the fact that the average age of our commercial farmers is 62. It is clear that the future of food production and rural job creation lies with South Africa’s 2.5-million emerging farmers.” Phosa added that since MASTD’s inception in 2005, the organisation had made significant inroads in uplifting emerging farmers through its business incubation system. “Last year alone, MASTD was instrumental in establishing 286 new SMMEs, creating more than 400 jobs,” Phosa, adding that the goal would be to establish laboratories in all nine provinces. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Continue reading

Torontos Ryerson University says bedbugs found in one of its classrooms

first_imgTORONTO – Bedbugs have been found in a classroom at Toronto’s Ryerson University, the school said Wednesday, noting that it was working to exterminate the insects.A spokeswoman for the downtown university said staff used a canine unit to search two classrooms in its Victoria Building on Tuesday, and found bedbugs in one of the rooms.“Bedbugs were found in a single desk in VIC 205,” Johanna VanderMaas said in a statement. “VIC 205 was treated with steam immediately.”VanderMaas said a canine unit will be brought back into the room on Thursday to ensure it is clear of the bedbugs.“Only once the room is deemed to be clear will students and faculty will be allowed back in,” she said.The school’s efforts came after a student newspaper, The Eyeopener, published a report of insects found inside tables in a classroom. The paper said it took photos of the bugs and sent them to five exterminators, who all said they were bedbugs.Jacob Dube, a student who worked on the piece, said Tuesday that Ryerson students reported seeing insects they believed to be bedbugs in a classroom in the school’s Victoria Building as far back as December.Several students who spotted the insects, including Eyeopener reporter Stefanie Phillips, later said they found what appeared to be bug bites on their skin.Dube said the university had been receptive to the student newspaper’s reporting, with officials asking the students to show them exactly where the bugs were spotted in order to independently verify their information.On Tuesday, Ryerson said it was looking into the matter and noted that students had been helpful in bringing their concerns forward.The university’s campus is located in the downtown core, close to the city’s bustling Yonge and Dundas square.last_img read more

Continue reading