Davis Polk Welcomes Capital Markets Partner Jason Xu in Beijing

first_img Pinterest Davis Polk Welcomes Capital Markets Partner Jason Xu in Beijing Local NewsBusiness Twitter TAGS  By Digital AIM Web Support – February 21, 2021 WhatsApp BEIJING–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 21, 2021– Davis Polk today announced that leading Hong Kong capital markets lawyer Jason Xu will join the firm as a partner in the Corporate Department in Beijing. “We are delighted that Jason will be joining Davis Polk,” said Neil Barr, Davis Polk’s Managing Partner. “He will join our outstanding team of lawyers in China. Demand for elite Hong Kong law advice continues to grow, and Jason adds important bench strength that will further enable us to deliver the highest level of service to our clients in the region.” Mr. Xu will join Davis Polk from Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP, where he serves as deputy head of equity capital markets in China. His practice focuses on equity capital markets matters, including Hong Kong IPOs, rights issuances and follow-on offerings. He also advises on domestic and cross-border public and private M&A and regulatory matters. Mr. Xu has experience across a broad range of industries, including technology, pharmaceuticals, financials, industrials and real estate. “Jason will be a tremendous addition to our team in Beijing,” said Howard Zhang, head of Davis Polk’s Beijing office. “His impressive experience in Hong Kong corporate matters will be of great value to our clients.” “Jason is a dynamic and exceptionally skilled lawyer, and one of the preeminent corporate practitioners in China,” said Li He, co-head of Davis Polk’s Greater China practice. “He will be an excellent complement to our market-leading team and will anchor the future of our Beijing presence.” Jason Xu said, “I am honored to be joining Davis Polk. I have long been impressed with the phenomenal team of lawyers here in China, and I look forward to helping the firm extend its reach in Hong Kong capital markets work.” Mr. Xu received a B.A. from China University of Political Science and Law in 2003 and a B.A. from the University of Oxford in 2006. A native Mandarin speaker, Mr. Xu is also fluent in English and Cantonese. About Davis Polk. Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP (including its associated entities) is an elite global law firm with world-class practices across the board. Clients know they can rely on Davis Polk for their most challenging legal and business matters. Our approximately 1,000 lawyers located in 10 offices in the world’s key financial centers and political capitals collaborate seamlessly to deliver exceptional service, sophisticated advice and creative, practical solutions. Visit davispolk.com. About Davis Polk’s China Practice. Davis Polk is a leading global law firm in China, handling transactions and disputes for Chinese corporates, multinationals, funds and financial institutions. Our clients rely on us for our commercial-minded and creative advice in capital markets and mergers and acquisitions transactions, as well as in investigations, enforcement and disputes. Our team combines in-depth knowledge of the Chinese market with extensive international experience. We boast one of the largest presences among the top global law firms in China, with more than 100 legal professionals in Beijing and Hong Kong. Substantially all of our lawyers are native or fluent Chinese speakers. We offer a fully integrated platform advising on U.S., Hong Kong and English law. View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210221005066/en/ Katie Moss, Director of PR & Communications,[email protected]  KEYWORD: CHINA ASIA PACIFIC INDUSTRY KEYWORD: LEGAL PROFESSIONAL SERVICES SOURCE: Davis Polk Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/21/2021 11:20 PM/DISC: 02/21/2021 11:21 PM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210221005066/encenter_img Facebook WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Pinterest Previous articleTrae Young, Clint Capela boost Hawks past Nuggets 123-115Next articleSIGN4L presenta nuevas capacidades de guerra electrónica en IDEX 2021 Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

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Spreading the knowledge

first_imgEmerging markets have provided an abundant labour supply forthe dot-coms of the West, but some are now starting to develop their ownhigh-tech hubs. Professor Lisbeth Claus reports Not surprisingly, these emerging market new economy hubs arefound in areas with an abundant supply of high-quality local knowledge workers.What these areas lack compared to Silicon Valley – a national contextsupporting entrepreneurship, work flexibility, management savvy, venturecapital investors and tax incentives – they make up for with the quantity,quality and cost of their labour force. However, there needs to be a certain infrastructure forInternet start-ups to develop into high-tech hubs. First and foremost, theemerging market must have the necessary brainpower for technologicaldevelopment. For example, India provides an abundance of programmers who supplySilicon Valley and other Western hubs with an outsourced labour supply. One of the biggest challenges facing high-tech industries indeveloping markets is the risk of failure. As we know from cultural expertssuch as Geert Hofstede and Fons Trompenaars, risk taking, uncertainty avoidanceand innovation are very culturally laden terms. In Israel, young people exposed to a military environmenthave built strong friendship networks in the army. Israel’s need forself-reliance in developing its own military technology has also created atechnological research environment. Immigration, especially from Russianscientists and engineers, has provided Israel with an abundant supply ofbrainpower. In addition, the pioneering attitude of an immigrant nation and theclose association between the government and the military in buffering the riskto market provides ingredients vital to successful entrepreneurship. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article China is often cited as an example of a huge potentialmarket for the Internet, but the country still has a restrictive politicalclimate where government controls over Website content and licensing inhibitthe free development of ideas. Government controls can also take the form oftax systems that reduce the profit potential of start-ups. The recent exodus ofthe corporate headquarters of Israeli high-tech firms to the US is a primeexample of the restrictive role government can play in preventing firms fromprospering in their home country. Singapore, with its stable political climateand tax incentives, has also attracted a number of new dot-coms. Dot-coms, whether they survive or not, have created a neweconomy culture that will have a lasting impact on a new generation ofknowledge workers. Some dot-com employees are now moving to more traditionalwork environments and will be taking with them a very different set of work stylesand risk expectations. Although less than 3.5% of the world’s population iscurrently connected to the Internet, its time and space reach is producing aworldwide subculture of knowledge workers connected through technology acrossborders and cultures. The dot-com work culture is so pervasive it will inevitablyinfiltrate the different national and work cultures of companies operating inboth developed and emerging markets. While emerging markets may have a comparative labouradvantage due to their brainpower and competitive costs, a number of factorsput them at a disadvantage compared to their Western counterparts. Dot-comsmust have access to capital from venture capitalists. For emerging markets thisoften means considerable foreign direct investment. There is also a need forexperienced management talent to bring the product to market and manage thestart-up’s business development. Emerging markets often lack senior managerswho are readily available and willing to take the employment risks associatedwith start-ups. Finally, Internet start-ups need a communicationinfrastructure, a potential market for customers, a stable political climateand limited government controls. Market failure for a dot-com start-up is not recognised andviewed in the same way in different cultures and subcultures around the world.A cultural trait of Silicon Valley is that (start-up) failure in itself isoften viewed as an opportunity – as if it were a badge of honour. The Latin andAsian cultures, on the other hand, put a huge emphasis on loss of face. Othercultures, especially Western European, are more security-driven and often lacksuch an incubator culture and entrepreneurial risk-taking ability. Spreading the knowledgeOn 1 May 2001 in Personnel Today Another advantage of emerging markets is the relatively lowwage structure. In Latin America, for example, telephone customer servicerepresentatives are available with minimal training and minimal waiting timefor on-line customers. In India, a pool of programmers is readily available atlocal market labour rates. Silicon Valley, the birthplace of the dot-com phenomenon, isno longer the exclusive domain of the new economy. High-tech firms are to befound not only in concentrated hubs in the US and Europe, but also in selectedemerging markets, the most flourishing of which are Israel, India, Singaporeand China. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Hovis boss Williams quits

first_imgIwan Williams, managing director of Premier Foods’ bakery division including the Hovis bread brand, has resigned from his position.Williams is leaving the company just over a week after the firm announced its decision to shut down two bakeries in Birmingham and Greenford, west London, resulting in 900 job losses.Appointed by Premier Foods’ chief executive Michael Clarke last November, Williams was overseeing the transformation of the £1.1bn-worth bakery division, including the Hovis bread brand, alongside its cake and milling businesses.Lisa Attenborough, director of communications at Premier Foods, told British Baker: “Iwan Williams advised us a while ago that he intended to move on next year to pursue other opportunities. He has been a tremendous help in kick-starting the turnaround, but longer term has career aspirations more in general management.”Sky News speculated on the move saying Williams was said to be unhappy with Geoff Eaton joining the company as chief operating officer, after Premier Foods announced last year that this particular role would disappear.This decision was to lead to the commercial leadership responsibilities being split between the bakery business and Premier’s grocery division, headed up by Graham Hunter, previously of the 2 Sisters Food Group.last_img read more

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