Gender pay gap: Women’s pay slowly catching up

first_img Comments are closed. Gender pay gap: Women’s pay slowly catching upBy Sheila Attwood on 21 Nov 2014 in Gender pay gap, Pay & benefits, Personnel Today, Pay settlements, Salary surveys Previous Article Next Article The gender pay gap is closing, but earnings growth has yet to catch up with inflation, the latest wage data shows.Figures from the 2014 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) reveal that the gap between the earnings of men and women is getting smaller. In April 2014, female employees’ hourly earnings stood at 90.6% of the equivalent male wage, resulting in a gender pay gap of 9.4%, down from 10% one year ago. The gender pay gap is now at its lowest level since records began in 1997, says the Office for National Statistics (ONS).Pay data on XpertHRPay trends November 2014: minimum wage increase above the going rate for pay awardsHowever, the gap varies more widely when other workforce characteristics are taken into account, notably whether employees work full or part time. TUC general secretary Frances O’Grady noted that “nearly six million women work part time and they earn £5.15 less per hour than full-time men”.The survey found that the median annual salary – at £27,195 – was 0.7% higher than one year ago. Analysis of weekly earnings reveals that, overall, pay increased by 0.1% between April 2013 and April 2014 – reflecting an increase in jobs at the lower end of the earnings distribution. For employees who were in the same job at the time of both surveys, pay rose by 4.1%.This figure is some way above the across-the-board increases that employers are making at the time of their annual pay review. The latest research from XpertHR shows that pay awards effective in the three months to 31 October 2014 were worth just 2%.With retail prices index inflation at 2.3% in October, on this measure pay continues to fall in real terms. Indeed, in presenting the latest ASHE data, the ONS notes that “adjusted for inflation, weekly earnings decreased by 1.6% compared to 2013”. All signs point to the return of real-terms earnings growth being some way off. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Continue reading

Move over airbnb… this could be interesting

first_imgSince airbnb launched, the rental property market has changed – more change is inevitable and exciting at the same time – and it could easily arrive in the UK.  This week’s news is that D Alexander, just launched in Denver, Colorado, USA, purchases single-family homes – whether rentals or private homes – and updates them, rebranding them and offering them up as smart short-term rentals.D. Alexander claims to be the answer to guaranteeing a positive guest experience that companies such as Airbnb, VRBO and HomeAway cannot – because they don’t own the homes they rent. Co-Founder Alex Allison said, “We saw a gap in the marketplace from a consumer standpoint. Airbnb is being treated as alternative lodging, but there are no brand standards. Over the last two years, travellers have been looking at Airbnb as hotels but they’re not getting what they expect.”Alex Allison & Dustin AbneyAllison and Co-Founder Dustin Abney are former Zillow executives so they have significant property listings experience and plenty of enthusiasm, now their new business, D. Alexander, buys homes, updates them to a very high standard, installs new, modern furniture and provides care products such as shampoos, lotions and soaps. It is a new twist on vacation/business accommodation.D. Alexander’s nightly rates will range from $300 to $700 a night, depending on the size of the home, market inventory and amenities such as pools, hot tubs or golf carts, Allison said. The company generally looks for four-bedroom, four-bath homes that are friendly for larger groups and families.Allison declined to disclose how many homes the company has already purchased until the company officially rolls out them out for rent. D. Alexander avoids markets like Denver that have stringent regulations that only permit people to rent their homes through companies like Airbnb if it is their primary residence. “We just don’t buy in those markets,” Allison said. “Usually, that occurs in major metros and urban markets. They have to regulate it to a higher degree.”Instead, D. Alexander looks for properties in resort towns that are generally reliant on tourism as their primary economic driver and have a relatively low supply of traditional lodging. While the company is not yet disclosing the exact locations of its holdings, Allison says the world is definitely open to more high standard, short term rentals.The question is, could this work in the UK?Take a look: staydalexander.comNote: this is a company in the USA, not to be confused with D.J. Alexander, Solicitors and estate agents in Scotland.Alex Allison Dustin Abney short-term vacation rental startup staydalexander.com boutique hotels airbnb Sheila Manchester July 17, 2019The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Move over airbnb… this could be interesting previous nextAgencies & PeopleMove over airbnb… this could be interestingUSA short-term vacation rental startup D Alexander flips houses into boutique hotel style homes, but could it work in the UK?Sheila Manchester17th July 20190771 Viewslast_img read more

Continue reading