Costa Rica’s Coast Guard Makes Large Cocaine Seizure

first_imgThe Coast Guard stopped the boat, which had an Ecuadorean flag hand painted on its side, in an area of international waters that’s commonly used by narco-traffickers to transport drugs between Panama and Costa Rica. Coast Guard agents confiscated the cocaine, which was wrapped in eight bags, and transported it to the Prosecutor’s Office in Province of Puntarenas. The country disbanded its Army in 1948, leaving the Coast Guard responsible for protecting Costa Rican waters. The Central American nation is a key transshipment point for international drug traffickers who transport cocaine from South America into Mexico, the United States, Canada and Europe. About 80 percent of the cocaine that reaches the United States is trafficked through Mexico and Central America, the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board stated in its 2014 Report. Costa Rica made important strides in its counter-narcotics fight in 2014, seizing more than 26 metric tons of cocaine – a record amount for one year and up from 21.8 metric tons seized in 2013. During the year Costa Rican law enforcement authorities confiscated $13 million (USD) from narco-traffickers and broke up 124 national and international criminal organizations. Costa Rica’s Coast Guard recently arrested three Colombians in connection with the seizure of between 200 and 300 kilograms the suspects allegedly hid on a boat in the Pacific Ocean. The Coast Guard stopped the boat, which had an Ecuadorean flag hand painted on its side, in an area of international waters that’s commonly used by narco-traffickers to transport drugs between Panama and Costa Rica. Coast Guard agents confiscated the cocaine, which was wrapped in eight bags, and transported it to the Prosecutor’s Office in Province of Puntarenas. Costa Rica’s Coast Guard recently arrested three Colombians in connection with the seizure of between 200 and 300 kilograms the suspects allegedly hid on a boat in the Pacific Ocean. By Dialogo April 09, 2015 The country disbanded its Army in 1948, leaving the Coast Guard responsible for protecting Costa Rican waters. The Central American nation is a key transshipment point for international drug traffickers who transport cocaine from South America into Mexico, the United States, Canada and Europe. About 80 percent of the cocaine that reaches the United States is trafficked through Mexico and Central America, the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board stated in its 2014 Report. Costa Rica made important strides in its counter-narcotics fight in 2014, seizing more than 26 metric tons of cocaine – a record amount for one year and up from 21.8 metric tons seized in 2013. During the year Costa Rican law enforcement authorities confiscated $13 million (USD) from narco-traffickers and broke up 124 national and international criminal organizations.last_img read more

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Funding for animal ID and tracking announced by USDA

first_img “This first phase of funding to states and tribes takes us closer to our goal of implementing a national animal identification system (NAIS) for all U.S. livestock and poultry animals,” Veneman said on Aug 5. The project aims to create a system to identify farms and other sites exposed to foreign animal diseases. Grants range from $1.2 million (for a tri-national proposal that includes the Navajo and Hopi tribes; Sonora and Chihuahua, Mexico, and Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico) to $50,000 for the Texas-Oklahoma-Osage Nation NAIS project. The $11.64 million is part of $18.8 million budgeted for NAIS this year. The remaining funds are being used for developing the database infrastructure, training at state and federal levels, and launching an education and outreach campaign to improve voluntary cooperation, said Amy Spillman, APHIS spokeswoman. The program is tentatively budgeted at $33 million next year. Aug 11, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Twenty-nine states and tribal projects will receive $11.64 million in federal grants to develop livestock identification and tracking systems, Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman has announced. The 29 recent grant recipients can register sites through USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) or other accepted tracking system. Their funded plans call for electronically collecting intra- and interstate animal movement records, integrating data-collection technologies at livestock marketing facilities and processing plants, tracking imported livestock, and electronically gathering animal movement data as livestock are loaded on and off trucks and trailers, according to a USDA news release. See also: center_img Last December’s discovery of a cow in Washington state with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) heightened concerns about animal tracking in part because officials never found all the cattle from her birth herd. The grants come just 3 months after the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced it would spend $18.8 million for a national system to help contain animal disease outbreaks. The department’s eventual goal is to be able to identify all animals and premises that have had direct contact with a foreign animal disease or disease of concern within 48 hours of discovery, USDA said. USDA news releasehttp://www.usda.gov/Newsroom/0325.04.htmllast_img read more

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