Six Nations: Ireland 26-3 Wales

first_imgNOT FOR FEATURED Perfect timing: Rob Kearney and Leigh Halfpenny catch a high ball at the same timeBy Sarah Mockford at Aviva StadiumThe match in 30 secondsIreland outplayed Wales in every facet and head to Twickenham in a fortnight with a chance of winning the Triple Crown. The defending champions looked lacklustre and had no answer to Ireland’s driving lineout, which delivered tries for Chris Henry and Paddy Jackson, while their high penalty count allowed Johnny Sexton to steadily build a comfortable lead.Ireland – Tries: Henry, Jackson. Cons: Sexton, Jackson. Pens: Sexton 4.Wales – Pen: Halfpenny.He can kick it: Johnny SextonPost-match bulletin–       This is Warren Gatland’s heaviest Six Nations defeat as Wales coach and he described it as “one of the most disappointing performances since I’ve been Wales coach”.–       Wales paid the price for ill-discipline, conceding 15 penalties.–       Possession (49-51) and territory (50-50) was an even split – but Ireland were able to do a lot more with it.–       Dan Lydiate and Jamie Heaslip topped the tackle charts with 12 while Rob Kearney made the most metres with 79 and Toby Faletau the most carries with 15.–       Ireland kicked the ball from hand 46 times compared to Wales 27 and made four line breaks to Wales’ one.– Joe Schmidt admitted that Ireland’s limited game plan was due to the expected downpours that didn’t materialise until late on.–       Scott Williams is in a sling after hurting his shoulder in the tackle on Brian O’Driscoll while Dan Tuohy has fractured his forearm. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A fit-again Davies returns in place of the injured Williams, James’s superior scrummaging gets him the nod ahead of Gethin Jenkins while Warburton and Tipuric both play in a bid to improve Wales’ fortunes at the breakdown. Leap of faith: Paul O’ConnellWhat’s next?–       Ireland, particularly their pack, will take great confidence from this win and will need to produce an equally capable performance against England. Their driving lineout is fast becoming a huge threat to opposition teams and Joe Schmidt will want Peter O’Mahony’s breakdown work to be as effective at slowing down England’s game as Wales’.–       Given the forward dominance, Ireland should be looking to do more with the ball. There was a lot of kicking – and in fairness Sexton mixed up his kicks well – but keeping the ball in hand on occasion would bring more variety to their game and that is something Schmidt is sure to be looking for.–       Wales will surely be spending a lot of time working on the breakdown over the coming two weeks. They were not able to keep possession for long periods in Dublin and can’t risk giving a dangerous France back-line turnover ball. They also need quick ball themselves, or their own backs become redundant – as they were for large parts of the game here.–       They also need to address their driving lineout defence – they struggled to get a handle on Ireland’s dominance in that area and other teams will be looking to target them too – and their discipline.RW’s proposed Ireland XV v England:Rob Kearney; Andrew Trimble, Brian O’Driscoll, Gordon D’Arcy, Dave Kearney; Johnny Sexton, Conor Murray; Cian Healy, Rory Best, Mike Ross, Devin Toner, Paul O’Connell, Peter O’Mahony, Chris Henry, Jamie Heaslip.After such an impressive performance, an unchanged – and experienced – team should do well at Twickenham. Martin Moore is pushing Mike Ross hard for the tighthead spot and if Tommy Bowe fires on his return from injury he could come in for Trimble.RW’s proposed Wales XV v France:Leigh Halfpenny; Alex Cuthbert, Jonathan Davies, Jamie Roberts, George North; Rhys Priestland, Mike Phillips; Paul James, Richard Hibbard, Adam Jones, Andrew Coombs, Alun Wyn Jones, Sam Warburton, Justin Tipuric, Toby Faletau.last_img read more

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Gardai warn no park and ride facilities available during Irish Open

first_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Twitter DL Debate – 24/05/21 By News Highland – July 3, 2018 WhatsApp Google+ Facebook Twitter Previous articleTwin Towns residents concerned over on-going traffic delaysNext articleSligo Stages Rally postponed due to Exceptional Weather – Connacht Motor Club News Highland Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Google+center_img AudioHomepage BannerNews WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Gardai warn no park and ride facilities available during Irish Open Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Gardai have issued a further warning over traffic arrangements ahead of the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open in Ballyliffin. Complimentary Shuttle Services are available for residents and for visitors staying in accommodation in Carndonagh, Buncrana and Clonmany.However, there is no park and ride facilities in these towns as all motorists travelling to the Irish Open are being asked to drive to Ballyliffin Golf Club where ample free parking is available.People are being warned that their cars will be clamped and towed if found to be parked illegally.Crime Prevention Officer Sgt Paul Wallace:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/walfbcbcvblace1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Pinterest Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODAlast_img read more

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USA: Odyssey Marine Exploration Executes HMS Victory Agreement

first_img View post tag: marine View post tag: usa February 2, 2012 Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: Odyssey Marine Exploration Executes HMS Victory Agreement Industry news View post tag: agreement View post tag: Executes View post tag: Exploration View post tag: Naval View post tag: Victory View post tag: Navy Odyssey Marine Exploration, Inc. , a pioneer in the field of deep-ocean shipwreck exploration and archaeology, has executed an agreement with the Maritime Heritage Foundation for the financing, archaeological survey and excavation, conservation and exhibit of HMS Victory (1744) and artifacts from the shipwreck site. HMS Victory was a British First Rate Warship that sank during a storm in 1744 while under the command of Admiral Sir John Balchin.In 2008, Odyssey discovered HMS Victory and is salvor-in-possession of the wreck. After a period of joint consultation between the UK Ministry of Defence and the UK Department for Culture, Media and Sport, and a public consultation period, the remains of HMS Victory were transferred to the Maritime Heritage Foundation in January 2012. The Foundation, a charity established to locate shipwrecks, investigate, recover and preserve artifacts to the highest archaeological standards and to promote knowledge and understanding of Britain’s maritime heritage, has now assumed responsibility for the future management of the wreck site.“We are honored to work with the Maritime Heritage Foundation on the Victory project, an important piece of British naval heritage. Since our discovery of HMS Victory, we’ve continued to monitor the site and have sadly noted significant changes to the site including four ton cannon that have been dragged and damaged, as well as the illicit recovery of a cannon by another salvor, signs that the idea of preserving the site in situ is clearly not practical,” said Greg Stemm, Odyssey CEO. “We plan a phased approach which will include an initial non-disturbance survey and expect to begin the archaeological excavation as soon as practical.”“We hope that this site will give us a unique insight into the world of the mid-eighteenth century Royal Navy,” stated Sir Robert Balchin, the Chairman of the Maritime Heritage Foundation. “We are very concerned that natural erosion, damage from fishing vessels and illegal looting may endanger the wreck and therefore we have planned an archaeological survey that will record the site before it deteriorates further. Odyssey Marine Exploration has proved its expertise and we are looking forward to working with them to protect the maritime heritage associated with Balchin’s Victory.”Pursuant to the executed agreement Odyssey has produced an extensive project design for the archaeological excavation of the site, including a complete plan for recording, documentation, conservation, publication and public education. Once the project plan is approved by the Foundation, fieldwork is expected to begin in early 2012, depending on weather conditions and equipment availability.The agreement calls for Odyssey’s project costs to be reimbursed and for Odyssey to be paid a percentage of the recovered artifacts’ fair value. The preferred option is for Odyssey to be compensated in cash. However, if the Foundation determines, based on the principles adopted for its own collection management and curation policy, that it is in its best interest to de-accession certain artifacts, the Foundation may choose to compensate Odyssey with artifacts in lieu of cash.Odyssey will receive the equivalent of 80% of the fair value of artifacts which were primarily used in trade or commerce or were private property and bear no direct connection to the construction, navigation, defense or crew of the ship, such as coins or other cargo.Odyssey will receive the equivalent of 50% of the fair value of all other objects typically associated with the construction, crewing and sailing of ships including, but not limited to, the ship’s hull, fittings, fasteners, construction elements, clothing, organic remains, foodstuffs, cooking utensils, pottery, weapons, ammunition, ground tackle and navigational equipment.For any private property including coins or other cargo administered through the Receiver of Wreck, the Foundation has agreed that Odyssey shall receive 80% of the value.A Private Curatorship Program will be established for certain artifacts from the site considered by the Foundation to be suitable for de-accession to prevent their irretrievable dispersal and to allow ongoing scientific study. About The Maritime Heritage FoundationThe Maritime Heritage Foundation is a charitable trust established to locate shipwrecks, investigate, recover and preserve artifacts to the highest archaeological standards, and to promote knowledge and understanding of Britain’s maritime heritage. The Foundation has been entrusted, by the UK Ministry of Defence, the shipwreck site of HMS Victory, which sank off the coast of southwest England in 1744 while serving as the flagship of Admiral Sir John Balchin. The Foundation seeks to prevent damage to this historically important site and to maximize its archaeological, scientific and educational value and envisions an archaeological excavation of the site, the conservation, exhibition and study of the artefacts recovered, as well as the development of programs to educate a new generation about maritime history. The Chairman of the Trust is Sir Robert Balchin who is a kinsman of Admiral Sir John Balchin. The Maritime Heritage Foundation is a Charity Registered in England no 1141244.About HMS Victory (lost 1744)HMS Victory, commanded by Admiral Sir John Balchin, was considered the greatest ship in the world when she disappeared. Built with three decks and elaborately decorated open stern galleries and armed with up to 110 guns Victory was the last Royal Navy warship to be lost at sea with a complete complement of bronze cannon. Her final voyage began in July 1744, when a fleet was dispatched under the command of Sir John, one of Britain’s most revered admirals, and she sank on 5 October 1744.Theories about the demise of the Victory began to circulate almost immediately. When wreckage marked with the name Victory washed ashore on the coasts of Alderney, Guernsey and Jersey, it was assumed the ship went down off the Channel Islands. The prevailing belief was that the warship had struck the Casquets, a group of rocky islets northwest of Alderney, infamously known as the “graveyard of the English Channel.” The tragic loss of Victory has long puzzled scholars and although the remains were never located, the blame for the ship’s loss was placed on poor navigation by the Captain. The Alderney lighthouse keeper was subjected to a court martial for allegedly failing to keep the lights on between 1 and 5 October, 1744. For nearly 300 years, the wreck site has been searched for fruitlessly, until in 2008, Odyssey Marine Exploration discovered the wreckage, ending one of Britain’s most perplexing naval mysteries. The discovery put to rest questions about where the Victory sank, for it was found nearly 60 miles west of the Casquets and thus exonerated the officers as well as the Alderney lighthouse keeper.About the Archaeological Survey of HMS VictoryFieldwork will be conducted in accordance with an approved project design, and the work is anticipated to begin in early 2012 depending on weather conditions and equipment availability. The fieldwork will seek to answer various unresolved historical questions through a non-disturbance survey including:Did the massive three-decked, 53 meter-long warship sink due to poor construction using inferior wood?How well are the ship’s hull and original interior spaces (archaeological contexts) preserved?How do the artifacts reflect the differing social hierarchy and cultural tastes of life at sea for the 1,100-person crew (the ‘upstairs-downstairs’ effect studied by comparing wooden mess bowls with more costly ceramics; clothing accessories, such as buttons and watches)?What was the real extent of Victory’s firepower, based on an examination of the warship’s unique bronze cannon (listed as up to 100 guns)?About Odyssey Marine Exploration, Inc. Odyssey Marine Exploration, Inc.  is engaged in deep-ocean exploration using innovative methods and state-of-the-art technology. The Company is a world leader in shipwreck exploration, conducting extensive search and archaeological recovery operations on deep-ocean shipwrecks around the world. Odyssey also has a minority ownership stake in Neptune Minerals, a company focused on discovering and commercializing high-value mineral deposits from the ocean floor. Odyssey also provides contracting services, including proprietary deep-ocean expertise and equipment, to governments and companies around the world.Odyssey recently located the shipwreck of the SS Gairsoppa, which sank in 1941 carrying a reported cargo of up to seven million ounces of silver and the SS Mantola, which sank in1917 with a reported 600,000 ounces of silver. The Company also discovered the Civil War-era shipwreck of the SS Republic® in 2003 and recovered over 50,000 coins and 14,000 artifacts from the site nearly 1,700 feet deep. In May 2007, Odyssey announced the historic deep-ocean treasure recovery of over 500,000 silver and gold coins, weighing 17 tons, from a Colonial-era site code-named “Black Swan.” In February 2009, Odyssey announced the discovery of Balchin’s HMS Victory. Odyssey also has other shipwreck projects in various stages of development around the world.Odyssey offers various ways to share in the excitement of deep-ocean exploration by making shipwreck treasures and artifacts available to collectors, the general public and students through its webstore, exhibits, books, television, merchandise, educational programs and virtual museum located at www.odysseysvirtualmuseum.com. Odyssey’s shipwreck operations are the subject of a Discovery Channel television series titled “Treasure Quest,” produced by JWM Productions. The 12-episode first season aired worldwide in 2009. Following previous successful engagements in New Orleans, Tampa, Detroit, Oklahoma City, Charlotte, Baltimore, Sarasota, and San Antonio, Odyssey’s SHIPWRECK! exhibit will open at the Mid American Science Museum on February 14, 2012. For details on Odyssey’s activities and its commitment to the preservation of maritime heritage please visit www.shipwreck.net.Odyssey Marine Exploration believes the information set forth in this Press Release may include “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Act of 1934. Certain factors that could cause results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements are set forth in “Risk Factors” in Part I, Item 1A of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010, which has been filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , February 02, 2012 USA: Odyssey Marine Exploration Executes HMS Victory Agreement View post tag: HMS View post tag: Odyssey Share this article View post tag: News by topiclast_img read more

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Institute for Advanced Study awarded grant

first_imgThe Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study has won $1.58 million from the John Templeton Foundation to host scholars interested in the “big questions” of philosophy, theology and science. Vittorio Hosle, professor and the Paul Kimball Chair of Arts and Letters, said the Templeton grant aligns with the institute’s methodology of research. “The Templeton Foundation is one of the most impressive foundations in this country,” Hosle said. “Their parameters for the type of research we want to foster is very similar to the Institute for Advanced Study, so it was a natural cooperation between what we want to do and what they want to do.” The foundation chose Notre Dame’s institute for its history of interdisciplinary research, Hosle said. “[The institute] is the right avenue to foster a type of research that is both more interdisciplinary and acts against the tendency of more and more limited specialization we’re seeing so much academia,” he said. “At the same time [the institute] tries to address big questions, the answers to which Sir John Templeton dedicated his life.” Hosle said the fellows at the institute are pleased with the grant because it will allow them to increase the caliber of scholars brought to research on campus. “All the questions have a big-question normative dimension, which would belong to philosophy or theology,” he said. “[The foundation] wants these questions to be addressed by those who have ‘know-how’ in the sciences. Selected scholars will live at Notre Dame and work with the institute for a year. “We have twice a week lunches where all of the fellows meet and present their proposals, which are selected according to their interdisciplinary qualities and their normative dimension,” Hosle said. “It is a way of living a life in which you do not only meet with the colleagues in your own department. The scholars will benefit from the chance to interact with scholars outside of their normal setting with persons from very different disciplines.” Undergraduate students will have the opportunity to work with the scholars as research assistants. “[Undergraduates] will learn how great scholars work,” he said. “People brought into the life of the mind will see how interesting and ambitious it is, and it may increase intellectual curiosity.” Hosle said scholars should produce a book while researching with the institute. “We hope these books will have an impact in various disciplines, possibly outside of academia,” he said. “Many people have to deal with the problem of creativity, persons in businesses.” There should be an incentive to study these types of big questions, Hosle said. “Realistically, since people want to make a career and feed a family, it is important that there are institutional structures that recognize work that is interdisciplinary,” he said. “There are not enough of them. The narrow approach is not the research of the future.” Donald Stelluto, the associate director of the Institute for Advanced Study, said applicants for the scholarship will focus on questions such as “What is human creativity and how does it manifest itself?” and “What is the place of the human mind in nature?” “Who will apply is also partly driven by scholars who work those areas in line with those big questions,” Stelluto said. “Not every scholar may yet be at a point in their career where they can address those types of questions.” The questions will connect the sciences with other disciples, especially theology and philosophy, he said. “This approach is a departure from a more myopic approach to research and returns back to big questions that link together the sciences with the other disciplines,” Stelluto said. “The formation of the universities during the Middle Ages and the Catholic intellectual tradition, integrated disciplines, and that’s one of the thrusts of this fellowship program, it’s to reintegrate the disciplines on major questions.” Working with the scholars will allow undergraduates to develop creative approaches to research. “We have the potential to impact a whole generation of scholars as the program grows,” he said. “As problems and issues become more global in scope, they require more than one discipline to solve them. … We offer a new model, based on a return to an older tradition, for scholars to collaborate at a meaningful level.”last_img read more

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