Batesville Residents Could Pay More For Water

first_imgBatesville City Council members agreed with the proposal to raise water rates after hearing from Batesville Utility Service Board members Henry Pictor and Tim Dietz.If the ordinance is adopted next month, tenants could pay 40 percent more in 2014 and additional 10 percent in 2015 and 2016.The increase could assist the utility board as it searches for new sources to obtain water. Pictor addressed concerns with the life span of local reservoirs.“We built a good system. We had five reservoirs. But those reservoirs are heading towards obsolescence,” Pictor told council members on Nov. 13.He described Bishoff Lake having just ten feet of usable water since the bottom water contains too much silt. A long drought period could contribute to only three or four months of water supply for the city, according to Pictor.“In no way are we in a water crisis, but in the chance of a severe drought, or a couple droughts, no one knows,” said Batesville Mayor Rick Fledderman. “And it is not something the board, the council, or myself want to take a risk on.”Pictor said money is better spent on pursuing ground water as opposed to surface water. The ground water could be accessed from an aquifer.Though the water utility currently has funds in the bank, the additional revenue gained from the hike in water rates could contribute toward the 2014-2018 Batesville Water & Gas Utility capital improvement plans.“Number one is pursuing and coming up with a long term water supply,” Mayor Fledderman noted. He added that proposed water rates could make the city rate adequate and continue providing a suitable water supply to residents.“If we don’t have adequate funding to provide first class water supply it is going to hurt the overall community,” Fledderman mentioned.“I know people who are on fixed incomes and we very sympathetic towards that,” Fledderman said. “But with the increases, it will still have us towards the bottom of comparative communities.”If approved, the ordinance goes into effect Feb. 1, 2014.last_img read more

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Former FIFA president Joao Havelange dies at age 100

first_imgFORMER FIFA president Joao Havelange has died at the age of 100. The Brazilian was predecessor to Sepp Blatter at world football’s governing body, serving from 1974 to 1998.He resigned as FIFA’s honorary president in April 2013 following an investigation into bribery allegations and was admitted to hospital the following year with a lung infection.He was an International Olympic Committee (IOC) member from 1963 until 2011, resigning because of ill health.“He had one idea in his head, to make football a global game with his slogan ‘football is the universal language’, and he succeeded,” said former FIFA president Sepp Blatter.Havelange represented Brazil in swimming at the 1936 Olympics – the year he qualified as a lawyer – before his election to the IOC.As FIFA president, he led the World Cup’s expansion from 16 to 32 teams, with six competitions held under his tenure.However, his career was also mired in controversy over bribery allegations.In 2010, a BBC Panorama programme accused Havelange and son-in-law Ricardo Teixeira of taking millions of dollars in bribes from Swiss marketing agency International Sport and Leisure (ISL) to retain the company as FIFA’s sole official marketer.His resignation from the IOC five years ago avoided an investigation into the ISL allegations, which Havelange had denied.In 2012, Teixeira stepped down as head of Brazil’s football federation, a position he filled for 23 years, and resigned from the 2014 World Cup organising committee after coming under pressure over corruption allegations, which he also denied.As well as swimming at the 1936 Olympics, Havelange was part of the Brazilian water polo team at the 1952 Helsinki Games and was chef de mission for the Brazilian delegation at the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne.And it was as a sports administrator, particularly in football, that Havelange made his mark.He embarked on a career which began as president of the Metropolitan Swimming Federation in Brazil. He also became a member of the Brazilian Olympic Committee and joined the International Cycling Union in 1958.After becoming vice-president of the Brazilian Sports Confederation, he served as president from 1958 to 1973, before he became the most powerful man in world football.In 1974 he succeeded Britain’s Sir Stanley Rous to be elected FIFA president, marshalling support among those unhappy at the perceived European domination of the world governing body.An imposing figure, with piercing blue eyes, his astuteness as a politician and his adeptness at retaining power enabled him to hold the FIFA presidency for 24 years until being succeeded by Blatter in 1998.When Havelange was elected president, FFA’s Zurich headquarters housed just 12 staff members. But that figure increased almost tenfold over the next two decades as FIFA’S organisational responsibilities and commercial interests grew.Increasing the size of the World Cup to 32 teams gave countries from Asia, Oceania and Africa the chance to shine on the world stage, Cameroon becoming the first African country to reach the quarter-finals in 1990.It was Havelange who launched a wave of new tournaments, notably the world championships at Under-17 and Under-20 level in the late 1980s and the FIFA Confederations Cup and FIFA Women’s World Cup at the start of the 1990s.last_img read more

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