Hog farmers face ‘devastating decision’ over euthanizing herds

first_imgdusanpetkovic/iStockBy ANDY FIES, ABC NEWS(NEW YORK) — While shoppers may be confronting shortages at deli counters this week, those who raise the nation’s livestock, especially hog farmers, are confronting something far more painful: having to euthanize thousands of their animals.Pigs are raised on a strict “just-in-time inventory” schedule that allows for only a brief window when they are the right weight for processing. Beyond that size, they are too heavy for plant equipment and too big for the space where they grow. So farmers must then ship them off and make room for raising a new herd. The shutdown or slowdown of several big processing plants means that millions of hogs are backing up on farms without enough food or space to care for them.At a certain point, farmers have little or no choice but to euthanize these animals. That point has already arrived for many and more will face that choice within days.Mike Patterson raises hogs near Kenyon, Minnesota. His co-op has already had to euthanize about 2,000 animals and he may have to destroy thousands more in just over a week if he’s unable to deliver his pigs to a processor.“It’s really stressful,” he said, in a halting voice. “The thought of euthanizing animals and those animals going to waste goes against every grain of our being.”The financial toll matches the emotional toll. If Patterson has to dispose of his market-ready hogs, he stands to lose $450,000. There is no recompense for the euthanized animals.Thom Peterson, Minnesota’s commissioner of agriculture, estimates that as many as 10,000 hogs a day are being put down in his state. Farmers there rely heavily on two plants that were shut down for weeks due to the coronavirus: the Smithfield Farms plant in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and the JBS plant in Worthington, Minnesota.“So we have a lot of hogs that are ready to go to market and just nowhere to go,” Peterson said.The Worthington plant operated for a week with a small staff, euthanizing 3,000 hogs a day. The “kill side” of the plant reopened on Wednesday.With the nation’s meat processing capacity down by as much as 40% to 45%, the National Pork Producers Council estimates that 700,000 hogs a week are piling up “with nowhere to go.” By the end of September, “it could be 10 to 15 million animals that have to be euthanized,” said Mark Greenwood, an analyst with Compeer Financial, an agricultural-lending company.Patterson said he’s frequently asked why he and other producers can’t simply donate their oversupply of hogs to the needy. He said he is working with two local food banks to get some of his animals harvested for them, but “there’s nowhere to turn those animals into meat, and I can’t just drop off live hogs” at the food bank.While cattle producers are also affected by the COVID-related stall at meat processing plants, they do not face the urgency that worries those who raise hogs.“We can slow the rate of gain on cattle, shift them to grass and hold them longer. There’s a lot more flexibility in a processing line for cattle than there is for hog production,” John Robinson of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association explained.Cattle producers do stand to lose $13.6 billion because they cannot process their animals as before. But euthanasia, he says, “is not an option we’re going to need to pursue in beef production.”Poultry farmers are familiar with the problems facing hog producers as they have had to euthanize millions of birds. Patterson is completely sympathetic.“I think it’s an absolute shame for any of this food to go to waste — whether it be dumping milk or killing chickens.” But he noted that with poultry, “the production system is so much faster because you can go from a chick to a full-grown broiler in about six weeks.” With hogs, breeding to processing is a 10- to 11-month process.The Smithfield and Worthington plants that serve many Midwestern hog farmers have just resumed production, which will relieve the hog backlog somewhat. But they are not running at full capacity and farmers say they won’t be in time to catch up to the enormous oversupply of animals.A.V. Roth breeds pigs in Wauzeka, Wisconsin, and is president of the National Pork Producers Council. He knows producers in his state struggling with the “devastating decision” to euthanize their animals. The decision, he said, will be coming “extremely soon.” For smaller producers, that decision could mean “they’re gonna lose their farms, because they had to euthanize their animals, all because of the COVID-19 slowdown.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Merit leader Penge in squad for Irish Boys Open

first_img Marco Penge (Worthing, Sussex), current leader of the England Golf Boys Order of Merit, has been named in a squad of four to represent England Golf in the Irish Boys Open Championship over 72 holes at Lisburn Golf Club on 26th – 28th June. He will be accompanied by Jack Singh Brar (Brokenhurst Manor, Hampshire, IoW & CI), Jake Storey (Alnmouth, Northumberland) and Jonathan Thomson (Lindrick, Yorkshire). Penge, 15, ( Image ©  Tom Ward) has collected plenty of Merit points after winning the Fairhaven Trophy in a playoff last month, finishing joint third in the Douglas Johns Trophy, fourth in the Bernard Darwin Salver and sixth in the McEvoy Trophy. He also won the English Schools South Region title recently a couple of days after being beaten on countback for the individual prize in the Boys County Championship South East Qualifying. Singh Brar, 16, lying sixth on the Merit table, has been involved in two playoffs this year, winning the Berkhamsted Trophy but finishing second in the Hampshire Junior Championship, while he also finished third in the McEvoy Trophy. An under 16 cap for the past two years, he made his debut in last season’s Boys Home Internationals. Storey, 17, is the current holder of the McGregor Trophy following his victory in the English Under 16 Championship at Trevose last July. Capped an under 16 level, he is a member of the England under 18 squad. Thomson, 17, had considerable success within Yorkshire golf last year, winning the North of England under 16 Championship at Pannal and finishing runner-up in the Yorkshire under 16 Championship. He also captained Yorkshire’s under 16s last year and was capped by England against Scotland and Ireland at under 16 level. He helped Yorkshire win the Boys County Championship last August, winning four of his five games, and this year finished third in the Fairhaven Trophy to currently lie fourth on the Boys Order of Merit. 6 Jun 2013 Merit leader Penge in squad for Irish Boys Open last_img read more

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Little Silver Pub Hearing Moves Forward

first_imgGale’s clients have expressed concern that patrons of the tavern will use their private community as a thoroughfare to backtrack toward Sycamore Avenue via Essex Drive and Eastbourne Drive. Kelly 29, LLC had complied with the board’s deadline to return with a letter of intent from NJ Transit to help address the board’s traffic and parking concerns. Kennedy also said the proposed two-story structure should not be viewed as a “major development.” Rea said he made this determination over 49 observations of the commuter lot traffic over 10 days in 2017. He noted that on three occasions, NJ Transit required his team to complete those commuter lot parking counts during “gridlock alert days,” or days that NJ Transit deems to have overwhelming vehicular traffic, and urges commuters to use mass transportation. “We’re not generating more than a quarter-acre of new impervious surface. We’re not disturbing more than an acre of property. So this project does not trigger major development criteria of the NJDEP or borough ordinances,” Kennedy said. NJ Transit leases the commuter lot from Little Silver and, according to Krimko, the lease states that NJ Transit is permitted to sublet the lot to another user. However, an agreement could only be reached if the borough is willing to alter the lease agreement and expand the permissions of what the lot could be used for; in this case overflow parking for bar and restaurant patrons. LITTLE SILVER – With a preliminary agreement in hand from NJ Transit, the aspiring developer of the borough’s first licensed pub returned to the planning board Thursday. “I can tell you that (Brickwall’s) peak demand on both weekdays and weekends will be between 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. And at those times there will be at least 300 parking spaces in the train station parking lot that can be utilized,” Rea said. In total, the facility will house seating for 250 patrons and, by ordinance, is required to have 230 parking spaces. The plan calls for just 36 parking spaces on the 51 Oceanport Ave. property, a site that used to hold Pix Shoes. Seventeen of those spaces require a planning board waiver. The community members have requested that the developers implement signage discouraging patrons from turning into the community from Oceanport Avenue. To back his claim, Rea compared the seating of the proposed development with other Brickwall Tavern locations and similar restaurant operations in the area. Rea said the Brickwall Tavern in Burlington has a seating capacity of 150 and uses 95 parking spaces at peak hours of operation. Additionally, the Brick House Tavern + Tap in Neptune has seating for 250 with only 150 parking stalls. According to Kennedy, the tavern would open at 11 a.m. and serve its last drink at 1 a.m., before closing at 2 a.m. He said the last of the cleanup crew and managerial staff would be exiting the building at 3 a.m. “I understand that the size of the restaurant, in looking at your ordinance, requires 230 parking spaces, but quite frankly I just think that’s substantially on the high side,” said Rea, of McDonough and Rea Associates. Jeffrey B. Gale of Gale & Laughlin, an attorney who represents 15 townhouse owners residing in the Townhomes of Little Silver development located off Oceanport and Sycamore avenues, made a case that not only should the development be considered major, but oversized. According to Rea, the analysis showed that peak commuter parking in the lot occurs on weekdays, but volume is substantially lower on weekends, when the tavern would be at its busiest. Krimko added that after meeting with NJ Transit representatives, her impression was that NJ Transit “does not care how the lot is used,” and is willing to turn the negotiation over to the borough, as the only impact will be to the town itself and its citizens. “They are basically granting us access (to the lot), subject to us working out whatever terms we need to with the borough,” Krimko said to the board. “This letter is more than just an intention to sit and talk. This is significant. This is a letter of intent outlining the terms that they are willing to enter into an agreement with.” Gale showed that, based upon borough ordinance, a construction in need of 230 parking spaces is only permitted to be 8,182 square feet. The proposed construction is more than 3,000 square feet beyond that permitted size, hence the variance being sought. The developer’s traffic engineer John Rea said the requirement seemed excessive. The operation times and potential noise pollution are also a concern for the nearby townhome residents. Project engineer James Kennedy, who last offered testimony in July, was recalled Thursday to revisit the site plan’s parking element and, like Rea, stressed that the commuter parking lot is “an underutilized asset.” The proposed site of the tavern and the Townhomes of Little Silver are separated by a retail store (Brave New World Surf and Snow) and a series of trees. According to testimony by developer attorney Jennifer S. Krimko, the agreement with NJ Transit stipulated conditions for one-way traffic flow from the tavern parking lot to the commuter lot, as well as a pedestrian walkway and other safety measures. The developers plan to build a 11,480-square-foot, two-story tavern on a 0.63-acre plot with two bars on the first level and a third bar and outdoor balcony seating on the second floor. The Little Silver Borough Council said it will take no formal action until the planning board does. The hearing is expected to continue next month. In addition, Gale also noted that if parking were to be contained on site and limited to those 36 proposed spaces, the developers would be limited to building a structure no more than 2,286 square feet. This shortfall of 194 spaces is proposed to be balanced by the approximately 550 spaces in the commuter lot of the adjacent Little Silver train station. Kelly 29, LLC attorney Jennifer Krimko said such signage could be provided.last_img read more

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Reporter Misuses “Irreducible Complexity”

first_img(Visited 60 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 A secular science reporter blundered twice about irreducible complexity and evolution.Natalie Wolchover, writing for Live Science, was explaining why evolution never produced wheeled animals.  Eyes, she said, are no problem for evolution: “Despite the complexity of the eye, it manages to evolve because each advance in its development offers some advantage…. From start to finish, a full-on eye can evolve in as little as 400,000 years, evolutionary biologists have estimated” she claimed, without naming names.  Wheels, however, are beyond the reach of natural selection.  Her authority was noted atheist, Darwinist and anti-creationist Richard Dawkins.  After describing how evolution might produce an eye in stages, she said:The wheel, on the other hand, is an irreducibly complex system: It must work perfectly to work at all.… The sophisticated carpentry required to fashion wheel-and-axle systems explains why humans didn’t manage to invent them until the Bronze Age….Evolution can only build body parts in stages, but because a rudimentary, nonrotating proto-wheel provides no benefit whatsoever to an animal, the process of wheel development is destined to never begin. “The wheel may be one of those cases where the engineering solution can be seen in plain view, yet be unattainable in evolution because its lies the other side of a deep valley,” the evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins explained in a classic 1996 article on the lack of bio-wheels in nature, published in The Sunday Times.Finally, consider this: Even if an animal could make a sudden leap across that valley and find itself in possession of the genetic blueprint for a perfect pair of wheels, how would it even grow them? To rotate freely, wheels cannot be attached to the axles that support the rest of the body. So without attachment points, how would living wheels receive nutrients and expel waste? As Dawkins put it, “The problem of supplying a freely rotating organ with blood vessels (not to mention nerves) that don’t tie themselves in knots is too vivid to need spelling out!”Michael Behe, the originator of the term “irreducible complexity,” defined it in his book Darwin’s Black Box (1996) as “a single system composed of several well-matched, interacting parts that contribute to the basic function, wherein the removal of any one of the parts causes the system to effectively cease functioning.”  He made it clear he was not speaking of a system that “must work perfectly to work at all” as Wolchover alleged.More egregiously, Wolchover failed to point out the wheels that do exist in nature: the bacterial flagellum, for instance.  When ATP synthase is included, every animal on earth is wheeled after all.  Wheels for locomotion, to be sure, do not exist in place of animal legs, but they would only be functional on hard, flat surfaces which are rare in nature – a fact pointed out in the response on Uncommon Descent.  That’s why in search and rescue attempts after earthquakes, the authorities generally rely on the systems designed for such environments: dogs and horses.Do you need more evidence that secular science sites like Live Science are involved in a concerted effort to spread misinformation, glorify Charlie, and sacrifice their integrity in their devotion to act as propaganda arms for the Darwin Party?  By contrast, CEH gives the best mouthpieces for Charlie their best shot, quoting them at length.  If Wolchover and her employer really wanted to report the subject honestly, they would have quoted Behe – maybe even given him a chance to respond – and not exposed so blatantly their ignorance of the arguments for I.C.  We’re waiting for Live Science and the other Darwin Party propaganda outlets to show they can do honest reporting about evolution.  What really takes the cake is Wolchover’s insistence that eyes are easy to evolve.  We would like Wolchover or her hero Dawkins to evolve a fly eye, as recently described on Evolution News.  Anything is easy for pseudo-scientists whose operating principle is to Imagine everything.last_img read more

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a day agoHolloway: Leeds boss Bielsa right to hold back Nketiah

first_imgTagsLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Holloway: Leeds boss Bielsa right to hold back Nketiahby Paul Vegasa day agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer QPR boss Ian Holloway insists Leeds United manager Marcelo Bielsa is right to hold back on-loan Arsenal striker Eddie Nketiah.Holloway wrote for the Mirror: “Marcelo Bielsa is doing the right thing by keeping Eddie Nketiah on the bench – and bringing him on to score goals.”He’s not starting because he is inexperienced – but he is brilliant at what he does in the moment. In 90 minutes he might not give you what he is giving you as an impact off the bench. That’s clever management.”I’m very aware that being a manager you have to put people in the right position and that is part of your skill. So I would give Marcelo Bielsa credit that Nketiah is coming off the bench and scoring.”Some young players who start regularly lose their efficiency. They think they are ready for the 90 minutes but they aren’t quite.”I fully understand what Bielsa is doing and fully respect it – because he has been a manager for a long, long time.”At the minute – I wouldn’t change a successful situation. Nketiah is still a very, very young man and every time he comes on, he scores. So why change anything?” last_img read more

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Indigenous man was pepper sprayed before fatal shooting by RCMP in Saskatchewan

first_imgThe Canadian PressA police officer says an Indigenous man who died in 2017 after being shot by Saskatchewan RCMP was hit with pepper spray first.An inquest into the death Brydon Whitstone heard that officers in North Battleford, Sask., had boxed in a vehicle carrying Whitstone and a passenger after a police chase.RCMP Sgt. Pernell St. Pierre told the inquest he broke the car’s passenger side window to get a better look inside.He said he released pepper spray inside the car but Whitstone did not react to it.St. Pierre said Whitstone, who was 22, also didn’t respond to calls from officers to show his hands.The inquest had already heard that Whitstone put his right hand into his pants after he was told to get out of the car, even though he didn’t have a weapon.RCMP officers testified they followed the sedan Whitstone was in because it matched the description of one involved in a possible drive-by shooting, but the car failed to stop.The inquest heard the car Whitstone was driving crashed into two police vehicles and was badly damaged before it finally came to rest.Const. Jerry Abbott, the officer who shot Whitstone, told the inquest Whitstone appeared to reach for something in his pocket which Abbott thought was a gun, so he shot the man from Onion Lake, Sask., twice in the chest.An investigation by Regina police determined no criminal charges should be filed against police.The inquest is expected to conclude Friday.last_img read more

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School buses cancelled in Dawson Creek

first_imgDAWSON CREEK, B.C. – School buses in Dawson Creek have been cancelled.Buses will not be running in School District 59 near Dawson Creek due to the extreme cold.  Buses are still running in Chetwynd.  Schools are still open in the South Peace.In School District 60 today is a non-instructional day.last_img

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Ohio State offensive lineman Demetrius Knox out eight weeks with broken foot

Demetrius Knox suffered a broken foot in practice and had surgery on Friday. He will miss eight weeks. Credit: Sheridan Hendrix | Lantern PhotographerThe Ohio State football team has been struck with numerous injuries this season, raising questions about the team’s depth. On Friday, an OSU spokesman confirmed for The Lantern that OSU redshirt sophomore offensive lineman Demetrius Knox had surgery and will be out approximately eight week.Eleven Warriors was the first to report the initial story.Knox was listed as the backup right guard to redshirt junior Billy Price heading into Saturday’s game against Rutgers.Knox is the second offensive lineman for the Buckeyes to go down with injury after junior-college transfer Malcolm Pridgeon suffered a knee injury in fall camp that is expected to sideline him at least until November.The 6-foot-4, 308-pound Knox was a four-star prospect in the 2014 recruiting class from Fort Worth, Texas, and saw time for the Buckeyes in the Bowling Green and Tulsa games this season.Knox broke his foot in February 2015, which forced him to miss all of 2015 spring practice. read more

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