Call to rethink more work-life balance plans

first_imgCall to rethink more work-life balance plansOn 10 Apr 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article The Institute of Directors hascalled on the Government to rethink any future commitments to work-life balancepractices, warning that a further increase in family-friendly measures wouldundermine the competitiveness of UK businesses.Its new report,Keeping Britain Competitive: Manifesto for Business, suggests that the UK’sfall down the World Economic Forum league tables is due to increasing labour marketregulation. In 1998, the UK was ranked fourth, but it fell to ninth in 2000.The release of thereport is timed to challenge the Government’s awaited response to the GreenPaper on Work and Parents, which is due out any day.The IoD’s head ofpolicy Ruth Lea said, “The UK has a global economy and must retain itscompetitiveness so that business can thrive and deliver jobs and prosperity forall. Short of closing our borders to trade with the rest of the world, we mustcompete to stay in the race.”In the manifesto, theIoD calls for “sunset clauses” that allow legislation to expireunless there is a “conscious attempt to renew them”.It also urges theGovernment to implement a five-year review of regulations that affectindividual sectors and suggests that the auditing body charged with reviewingthe regulations must be independent of government departments.Lea said, “It isnot just the employment regulations that are onerous for business, the taxsystem is long overdue for simplification and all regulations should havesunset clauses and be regularly and rigorously audited.”www.iod.org.uk Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Announces New Funding to Help Attack PFAS Contamination of 17 Wells in Bucks County

first_img March 26, 2019 Environment,  Infrastructure,  Press Release,  Restore Pennsylvania Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced the approval of funding through the Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA) for projects that will remove contamination of harmful perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from the Warminster/Horsham and Warrington areas in Bucks County.“Access to safe drinking water is one of the fundamental rights of every Pennsylvanian,” Governor Wolf said. “This funding will provide clean and safe water for residents, and will help ensure the public health of these communities in Bucks County in the years ahead. Through the PFAS Action Team, we will continue addressing this serious issue across Pennsylvania.”PFAS are man-made chemicals, are resistant to heat, water and oil, and persist in the environment and the human body. PFAS are not found naturally in the environment. They have been used to make cookware, carpets, clothing, fabrics for furniture, paper packaging for food, and other materials that are resistant to water, grease, or stains. They are also used in firefighting foams and in a number of industrial processes.The CFA board approved a $5 million grant for the Warminster Municipal Authority (WMA) through the H20 PA program. WMA owns and operates the water supply and distribution system that serves Warminster Township, Ivyland Borough, and Warwick Township. Thirteen WMA wells have been contaminated by PFAS as a result of the use of firefighting foam at military bases in the area. The contamination caused the shutdown of the wells and required WMA to purchase water from another source at a much higher cost. This project will install treatment systems that will allow the wells to be placed back in service as a water supply source.Additionally, the board approved a $3 million grant through the H20 PA program for Warrington Township, Bucks County, to renovate four groundwater wells in the township contaminated by PFAS as a result of the use of firefighting foam. The township will equip the wells with ion exchange and granular activated carbon treatment systems to reduce contaminants to a “non-detect” level.In September 2018, Governor Wolf announced the establishment of a multi-agency PFAS Action Team and other executive actions to address growing national concerns surrounding PFAS. The PFAS Action Team, along with today’s approved projects to treat PFAS contamination, places Pennsylvania at the forefront of states taking proactive action to address PFAS and other water contaminants.“Sites in southeast Pennsylvania, and Bucks County, in particular, have been affected by PFAS contamination in Pennsylvania,” said Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick McDonnell, who chairs the PFAS Action Team. “The Action Team will be continuing to pursue solutions to addressing existing contamination and preventing new contamination.”Additionally, Governor Wolf’s bipartisan Restore Pennsylvania proposal seeks to further provide funding for eliminating PFAS contaminants in drinking water. While programs like H20 PA and the Hazardous Sites Cleanup program can help provide relief to some cases of PFAS contamination, additional resources are needed to combat the problem comprehensively across Pennsylvania. Restore Pennsylvania is a statewide plan to aggressively address the commonwealth’s vital infrastructure needs. Funded through a commonsense severance tax, Restore Pennsylvania is the only plan that will help make Pennsylvania a leader in the 21st century. View the full Restore Pennsylvania plan.Also at today’s CFA meeting, the board approved a $650,484 grant through the H20 PA program to rehabilitate the Middle Dam in East Stroudsburg Borough, Monroe County, which is classified as a high-hazard, unsafe dam. The project includes rehabilitation of the intake structures, gate valves, and concrete spillway to ensure the dam returns to a safe condition.More information about the Commonwealth Financing Authority can be found on the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) website. To stay up-to-date on all Pennsylvania economic development news, follow DCED on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn, and be sure to sign up for the department’s monthly e-newsletter. Governor Wolf Announces New Funding to Help Attack PFAS Contamination of 17 Wells in Bucks Countycenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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USC leaves Stanford frustrations behind

first_imgThe Pac-12 opener against Stanford this Saturday evokes some grim memories for USC. Perhaps the worst come from the midseason showdown at home last October, when the Trojans came close to upsetting the then-No. 4 Cardinal but fell in a 48-56 triple-overtime thriller.Lesson learned · In 2011, senior safety T.J. McDonald committed a costly personal foul late in regulation that led to a Stanford touchdown. – Carlo Acenas | Daily TrojanThough few could blame the Trojans for wanting to exact revenge, No. 2 USC (2-0, 0-0) insists that those thoughts are not motivating the team come Saturday.“[Luck] came out there and did what he did, but that was last year, and this year will be totally different,” junior cornerback Nickell Robey said.Robey nearly won that game for the Trojans with an interception he returned 33 yards for a touchdown that gave USC a 34-27 lead with 3:08 remaining in regulation.“I thought the game was going to be over at that point,” Robey said.Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck then engineered a final scoring drive that tied the game, and three overtimes later, Stanford won their 16th straight game.The rest of the team is trying to join Robey in his mindset: Move on from last year, and on Saturday, play even harder.One of the players who has embraced such a mentality is senior safety T.J. McDonald. The 2011 Pac-12 first-team selection was called for a personal foul on a third-and-out that kept Stanford’s game-tying drive alive.“Everything is in the past for me,” McDonald said. “Our coaches are going to put us in the position to make plays like they do every week. It will all come down to execution on Saturday.”USC coach Lane Kiffin commented on some of the team’s defensive strategies for a Cardinal pro-style offense that now relies on running back Stepfan Taylor, but stopped short of going into great detail.“We’re going to have to stop the run. We’ll have to play aggressive and really knock them back,” Kiffin said. “We have to play some really sound defense against these guys.”One of the key players for USC’s run defense will be junior defensive end Morgan Breslin, who transferred from Diablo Valley Junior College in the spring.Breslin has received a lot of recognition for his strong pass rushing skills in his two Division I games, but he still needs to prove he can withstand a stout Pac-12 running attack.“I’m very impressed for him to come in his first Division I college game and make as many plays as he has. He’s been huge for us — probably our biggest surprise,” Kiffin said.Breslin has 10 total tackles and two sacks as a starter and has helped fill the void left by senior defensive end Devon Kennard, who may be out for the season with a pectoral injury.Stanford will no longer have the luxury of Luck’s passing, but Kiffin still anticipates a tough matchup against the Cardinal in Palo Alto, Calif.“Every year is new,” Kiffin said. “Every team is new. We got to play really well on the road, versus a team that is really well-coached and is hard to beat. That’s why they’ve won a lot of games over the last couple of years.”last_img read more

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