Library receives Badin Bible

first_imgThe University recently acquired a Bible belonging to Stephen Badin, the first Catholic priest ordained in the United States and a previous owner of the land that eventually became Notre Dame’s campus. The Bible currently is on display in the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections in Hesburgh Library.Catholic Studies Librarian Jean McManus, who played a role in the acquisition, said John Carroll, the first Catholic bishop in the United States, gave the three-volume Bible to Badin in the late 1700s. She said Badin took it with him in his travels. These included visits to Kentucky and Northern Indiana, where he made his land purchases and built the original Log Chapel.Emily McConville Kathleen Cummings, director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, said Badin gave the Bible to the Sisters of Loretto in Nerinx, Ky., who owned it for more than 200 years before only recently realizing its significance. She said the religious order had the books appraised and then contacted the Notre Dame, who purchased them with grants from the Library Acquisitions Fund and the Office of Research, with letters of support from history and American Studies faculty. The Sisters then brought the book to campus and gave it to the University at a special Mass in the Log Chapel in late June.Cummings said the Cushwa Center and the Library were interested in making the acquisition because the Bible linked two early American church leaders as well as other aspects of the early Church in the United States.“The way the Bible brings together the story of Catholics at every level – the leadership, the laity and religious – that’s enormously important,” she said. “The Fr. Badin connection makes it special, but the significance is far larger.”Margaret Abruzzo, an associate professor of history at the University of Alabama, who is studying the correspondence between Carroll and Badin as part of a project with the Cushwa Center, said the Bible also is significant because of its rareness. She said the Bible was printed by Matthew Carey, an Irish immigrant in Philadelphia. The edition, which was only 500 copies, was the second full Bible published in the United States and the first Catholic translation.“[Carey] was interested in kind of refuting the idea that Catholics didn’t read the Bible,” Abruzzo said. “He wanted to get the Catholic Bible into people’s hands because it was very important to Catholics at the time that they read the Catholic version of the Bible rather than the Protestant version.”Abruzzo said the Bible, which contains an inscription from Carroll to Badin, speaks to the closeness of their relationship at a time when the American Catholic Church was small and far-flung.“Badin would write questions to Carroll, and Carroll would write answers,” she said. “He was a source of advice for Badin.“When there were issues, Carroll would intervene, so sort of imagine something that is a very, very, very small version of any sort of diocese today. Imagine Carroll running the Catholic Church out of his garage. It’s that level of informality. They’re really trying to create a church from scratch.”McManus said the Bible, which shows signs of heavy use, will be on display this semester in Special Collections, and it will be the subject of a symposium on Oct. 10. She said the Bible will be available for scholars, who may study the book’s binding, marginal notes or relationship to Badin’s other writings and letters.“Connecting those letters to this time frame, and knowing where the Bible lived, that’s all of interest as well,” she said. “Its biggest use is just gesturing towards this big story of the very early 1800s [when] Catholicism was very much a minority religion. Things could have gone very differently, but this is a piece of the evidence for how it did go, especially that westward movement.”Cummings said faculty can bring classes to see the Bible, and researchers also can study the Bible’s translation and inscription.“Researchers who come –  Bible scholars, scholars of American history –  it will be a text that will be studied by them for a long time now,” she said. “A lot of people come to Notre Dame to do research on Catholicism, and so it’s a crossroads of source to scholars, so it will definitely get more exposure.”Tags: Badin Bible, Catholicslast_img read more

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Gov’t reports 638,000 in job gains, the lowest rise since May

first_imgAs was the case with the Great Recession, some workers took years to fully recover economically and some never did. – Advertisement – While the rise from the depths of six months ago has been significantly better than expected, the Service industries—the bulk of the economy—nearly halted hiring in October, the trade group Institute for Supply Management said earlier this week that the service industries which make up the bulk of the U.S. economy just about ceased hiring in October. The scheduling-software company Homebase reported that small-business payrolls fell in the second half of October. And although some workers are doing fine in the Pandemic Recession, even doing better financially, others are struggling with no good prospects in the immediate future or longer. Without further congressional stimulus directed toward their needs, many of these workers will face even more desperate times. The Wall Street Journal reports:Just months ago, economists were predicting a V-shaped recovery—a rapid rebound from a steep fall—or a U-shaped path—a prolonged downturn before healing began.What has developed is more like a K. On the upper arm of the K are well-educated and well-off people, businesses tied to the digital economy or supplying domestic necessities, and regions such as tech-forward Western cities. By and large, they are prospering.On the bottom arm are lower-wage workers with fewer credentials, old-line businesses and regions tied to tourism and public gatherings. They can expect to bear years-long scars from the crisis. Unemployment rates differ by race and sex. (October percentages in bold; September percentages in [brackets and italics].) Adult men: 6.7% [7.4%]; Adult women: 6.5% [7.7%]; Whites: 6.0% [7.0%]; Blacks: 10.8% [12.1%]; Asians: 7.6% [8.9%]; Hispanics: 8.8% [10.3%]; American Indians: Not counted monthly.• Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees rose in October by 5 cents an hour to $24.82.• Average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls in October rose 4 cents an hour to $29.50.• Average work week for all employees on nonfarm payrolls remain unchanged at 34.8 hours in October.• The manufacturing work week in October rose by 0.3 hours to 40.5 hours.October job gains and losses for selected categories:Education and health services: 57,000° Health care & social assistance: 79,000Manufacturing: 38,000Professional and business services: 208,000Temporary help services: 108,700Transportation & warehousing: 63,200Financial activities: 31,000Leisure & hospitality: 271,000Information: -3,000Retail trade: 103,700Construction: 84,000Mining and Logging: 1,000Government at all levels: -268,000 Here are more data from the October jobs report:The civilian workforce rose in October by 724,000 after falling by 695,000 in September. The labor force participation rate fell by 0.3 to 61.7%. The employment-population ratio rose 0.8 to 57.4% in October.- Advertisement –center_img It should noted that each monthly jobs report is based on two surveys—of people and of business establishments—taken in the week that includes the 12th of the month. In other words, the information the report is based on is 3 weeks old.Olugbenga Ajilore, a senior economist at the left-leaning Center for American Progress, told The Washington Post Thursday. “The economy is at a very tenuous moment. Because there’s no further fiscal relief, we could go back and have another downturn and a loss in GDP. So a lot of it is very dependent on what the federal government does. The economy is still struggling and a lot of people within the economy are still struggling.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Osimhen’s Dad for Burial June 23

first_imgVictor Osimhen The family of Super Eagles striker, Victor Osimhen, has released the burial arrangement of his late father, Pa Patrick Osimhen.According to the statement by the family made available to journalists, Patrick Osimhen will be laid to rest in Lagos on June 23.Pa Osimhen aged 80, will be interred according to Christian rites at a private cemetery, Omega Memorial Garden, Ojodu, Lagos. Late Osimhen, who breathed his last on May 23 after a brief illness, is survived by seven children. Amongst whom are; Andrew, Samson, Gloria, Esther, Joy, Blessing and Super Eagles’ goal poacher, Victor Osimhen.Pa Osimhen lost his wife, Christiana Osimhen, in 2001 after a brief illness.The Osimhen family who are indigenes of Uromi, Edo State informed well wishers that they have concluded to adhere strictly to the social and physical distancing by the Lagos State Government during the burial ceremony.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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