LUH records fifth highest number of women waiting to see a gynaecologist

first_imgIreland’s consultant crisis is having a ‘serious effect’ on delivery of women’s healthcare as 1,783 women are currently waiting for an appointment with a gynaecologist at Letterkenny University Hospital.There has been a 40% increase nationally in the number of women waiting to see a gynaecologist in five years.Currently, there are 28,417 women waiting for an appointment across Ireland’s public hospitals, of these, 5,394 are waiting more than a year. Letterkenny University Hospital has the fifth highest number of women waiting on appointments.The hospitals with the longest wait times to see a gynaecologist are in Dublin, while Galway, Letterkenny and Limerick had the highest regional figures.In addition, almost one in five (5,394) women are waiting longer than 12 months to secure an appointment.The Irish Hospital Consultants Association says that the consultant retention and recruitment crisis is having a ‘serious effect’ on the delivery of healthcare to women across Ireland. The group says that one-in-five or over 500 of all permanent consultant posts nationally are now empty or only temporarily filled, resulting in patients waiting long periods to access essential healthcare services.They say that consultant salary cuts are driving specialists abroad and new consultants are being paid up to 51% less than their colleagues.As part of their #CARECANTWAIT campaign, the IHCA says that it is time for the Government to restore pay parity for new consultants.LUH records fifth highest number of women waiting to see a gynaecologist was last modified: August 21st, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Don’t fret the draft pick — here’s why the 49ers’ win is worth celebrating

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or video on a mobile deviceSANTA CLARA — Niners fans have been looking towards the NFL Draft since Jimmy Garoppolo tore his ACL in September. It’s understandable: In this lost season, the reward of a high draft pick can make losing tolerable.But that doesn’t mean that winning shouldn’t be celebrated. The 49ers beat the Seahawks for the first time since 2013 Sunday, with Robbie Gould’s 36-yard field goal in overtime deciding …last_img read more

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Preparing for the future world of work through STEM

first_imgEducation is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. – Nelson Mandela These words ring true now more than ever as South Africa, as with the rest of world, experiences and transitions into a radical period of change presented by the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR). A period which necessitates everyone to be open to learning, re-learning and discovery. The World Economic Forum (WEF) describes the 4th industrial revolution as the advent of “cyber-physical systems” involving entirely new capabilities for people and machines. It represents entirely new ways in which technology becomes embedded within societies and even our human bodies. Man vs Machine or Machine working for Mankind? With all these big words and terms associated with the imminent 4th Industrial Revolution being spoken about… robotics, artificial intelligence (AI), big data, cyber, crypto… may make the ‘giant leap’ into the digital era an intimidating exercise for many.  However daunting, the digital era presents a myriad of opportunities for innovation and technological advancement for South Africa as an enabler of human and skills development, business driver and economic growth. Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies, Ms Stella Ndabeni–Abrahams, has been actively driving the message on 4IR and laying the foundation to build a capable and skilled work force. At the heart of 4IR is human centred focus and we need to ensure an inclusive process to ensure no one is left behind, she said. We shine the spotlight on an organisation that is playing its part in the education field and making great strides to arm young girls from previously disadvantaged communities with the required skills for the future world of work through mentorship, empowerment programmes and exposure to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects and related careers. Technogirl Trust The TechnoGirl Trust exists to deal with South Africa’s skills shortage in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by encouraging girls to choose STEM subjects in high school. Girls from Grade 9 onwards from disadvantaged communities are placed in corporate mentorship and job shadowing programmes. Since inception in 2005, more than 11,000 girls have benefitted from the programme.  Brand South Africa recently joined the Technogirl Trust for the Young Women for STEM in Africa programme in partnership with the University of Johannesburg (UJ). Liana Meadon, Senior Manager: Academic Development Centre stated that the partnership is driven by efforts to close the gender gap in STEM and the programme provided a great platform to motivate and inspire young women to take up careers in the STEM field. The young girls also had the privilege to hear from Dr Tebogo Mashifana, a young woman who is a Senior Lecturer at UJ’s Department of Chemical Engineering Technology, nominee of the 2019 Mail & Guardian Top 200 Young South Africans and motivational speaker making waves in the STEM field. She inspired the girls, telling them that they are capable of achieving anything they put their minds to and shouldn’t let their backgrounds define their destiny. “I look at you and see future engineers, future scientists, and future leaders in the 4th industrial revolution”, she said. Dr Mashifana concluded by telling the learners that the world is rapidly changing and education and hard work are key to a brighter future. The interest and participation in STEM will set them apart and enable them to participate in mainstream careers of the future as digitalisation and the future world of work will be driven by those equipped in the STEM field.  The technology driven future affords us the opportunity to redefine our society and explore the future of a digitally enabled economy and countries transformation that is fair, inclusive, sustainable and competitive. As Brand South Africa, we encourage all citizens, not only the youth, to actively get involved in the 4IR and digital economy dialogue and skills development initiatives. It’s not only for government or businesses to adopt and master the digital era, but for all to take part, benefit and contribute towards the growth of the economy and SA’s competiveness.last_img read more

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Corn bearish, soybeans bullish

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Doug Tenney, Leist MercantileShock and awe with acres numbers today. Corn bearish, soybeans bullish. USDA did it again, it’s called a surprise!At a time when traders, producers, and end users are starving for information on acres and yield, today’s acres report falls far short. There is a vast amount of irony today due to what many have expected and what the numbers should reveal but likely won’t.The corn acres were 91.7 million acres while soybean acres were 80 million acres. Shortly after the report corn was down 11 cents, soybeans were up 12 cents.Shortly before the report, corn was up 2 cents, soybeans up 4 cents, wheat up 1 cent. The average corn acres estimate was 86.7 million acres with a range of 82 to 89.8 million acres. The average trade estimate for soybean acres was 84.4 million acres with a range of 81 to 86.5 million acres.The most attention today will focus primarily with corn. For weeks since mid-May there has intense focus on the lack of corn planting progress. Print and digital media have bombarded producers with literally a cascade of articles detailing prevent planting payment calculations and the author’s recommendations. USDA stopped collecting farmers’ surveys of acres planted and or their intentions to plant before many had made final decisions to not plant corn and soybeans. Those decisions to not plant were made June 10 and after.While Ohio leads the Midwest with the lack of planting progress on June 24 for corn and soybeans among the top eight U.S. states for corn and soybean production, don’t pin your hopes and 2019 gross revenues on this fact leading the market higher. Closer examination for 2018 US corn production reveals Ohio was 8th in corn production with 617 million bushels. Total U.S. corn production in 2018 was 14.4 billion bushels with Ohio producing 4.2% of the nation’s corn. Ranking the top 10 states in 2018 US corn production would be — Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska, Minnesota, Indiana, South Dakota, Ohio, Wisconsin, and Missouri.Without question the corn and soybean rally since mid-May has been solely a supply driven rally. Corn has pulled corn and soybeans along for the ride. Supply driven rallies are extremely volatile and difficult to navigate. A bull needs to be fed every day. The same can be said for a bull market.The weather with numerous weeks of rains and lack of sunshine resulted in week after week of planting delays. As the delays mounted the number of acres of corn not planted grew as well. Trader estimates were all over the spectrum as they pegged corn prevented planted acres anywhere from 4.5 million acres to as 12 million acres. It is still a moving target. It will likely be the Aug. 12 report when more is known on actual U.S. corn and soybean acres.The market drifted lower for weeks this spring.  The U.S./China trade talks which so many producers had pinned their hopes for a better 2019, collapsed when an agreement nor its signing date never materialized. The addition of a bearish March grain stocks report led some to believe U.S. corn production in 2018 may be have been larger than first reported. In addition,  monthly WASDE (supply and demand) reports this spring had less corn being fed to livestock. This number was inconsistent compared to past years. The news cycle was dominated with negative news. Within days, the start of a spring rally never imagined by producers was in its infancy.Weather will be a key factor in July. Hot and dry is typically bullish. Cool and wet is typically associated with the adage “rain makes grain.” More grain is bearish for prices. However, this summer cool and wet is likely to not be bearish most of the time.In case you have not come to this conclusion, put a few more notches in your seat belt. Buckle up.last_img read more

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