How 9/11 Changed the Trajectory of Data Protection and Security

first_imgIt’s been 13 years since the world changed.While there have been no shortage of tragedies since 9/11, including other acts of terrorism home and abroad, war, hurricanes, tsunamis, and massive tornados, no single event has matched the impact of that day thirteen years ago. The transformation of the world after that event has touched all our lives in ways big and small, the technology industry included.No, people really don’t care more about data protection now than they did then. Nor did the event set disk-based backup or VPLEX in motion. But 9/11 did help redefine the role and expectation of data protection. That day began the journey to converge data protection and security.In 2001, data protection was evolving to cope with relentless data growth, the need to reduce risk to business-critical applications, and a desire to streamline IT infrastructure. Disk was already replacing tape. Disaster avoidance (i.e., always available infrastructure) was supplanting “push the big red button” disaster recovery. Snapshots and replicas had become an integral part of an overall protection strategy. While new technologies (e.g., virtualization, cloud, and big data) have accelerated the transformation, the core data protection industry has advanced as expected—bigger, faster, and simpler.The attacks on 9/11 changed the trajectory of both data protection and security.For years, backup and security’s only intersection was, “I don’t want my tapes falling off a truck.” Backups were another security risk to be managed, nothing else.Meanwhile, governments and businesses began to arm themselves for the battle over information access and security. As they built fortresses around their infrastructure (e.g., networks, servers), they left themselves exposed behind those walls. If an attacker penetrated the defenses or staged an internal attack, the business was almost helpless to react. Even worse, they couldn’t mitigate or even evaluate the damage! One of the great challenges in defending an organization’s information was that they didn’t know what data they had, where it lived, what its value was, and whether something disastrous was happening to it.In a post-9/11 world, IT found itself with the security equivalent of the Maginot line.Today, businesses continue to see the symbiosis of data protection and security.  First, many modern attacks disable or destroy information access, so data protection must recover from both malicious and unintentional data loss. The recovery mechanisms and requirements are the same, even if the causes are different.   Second, IT leaders have begun to leverage the treasure trove of information stored in their protection infrastructure. The value, however, is not in the data copies, but in the metadata–the information about their information.Data protection provides the consolidated view of a company’s information assets–what the data is, where it lives, who has access to it, and what they are doing–which was lacking 13 years ago. By correlating that information with security analytics, customers can build an information-aware security infrastructure.Some of the use cases we’ve already seen include:“Has secure data leaked to unsecured servers?” Since protection spans across all data, customers can set rules based on file name, key word, or content to identify data leakages before they become widespread.“Are we seeing an excess of data deletion that may indicate an attack?” Since protection consistently runs against every server or data set, customers set alerts based on expected data elimination.“Can I find all information pertaining to this user and his contacts?” Since protection spans across all the applications – from SharePoint to laptops to file shares – customers have begun to make the protection copies the nexus of their investigations.ShareWhile IT must evolve their data protection and security solutions to address growing data, tighter budgets, and a call for more agility, they must do more than that.In a post-9/11 world, businesses and governments must look to IT to continue follow the trajectory set that day by delivering trusted infrastructure, and the only way to succeed is to combine the intelligence about the information with the intelligence about the infrastructure.last_img read more

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Ørsted notches record profits on green energy developments

first_imgØrsted notches record profits on green energy developments FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Clean Technica:Danish energy group Ørsted has posted record profits in 2018 as it blew away 2017 figures and significantly exceeded its own expectations as it sets its sights on a target of 99% green energy generation by 2025.Ørsted posted its 2018 Annual Report at the end of January, revealing that it had achieved an all-time high operational profit (EBITDA) of DKK30 billion ($4.59 billion) for the year, up an impressive 33% compared to its 2017 figures. EBITDA without new partnerships increased by 18% to DKK15 billion ($2.30 billion) for the year, significantly exceeding the company’s expectations set at the beginning of the year and even the company’s most recent guidance of somewhere in the range of DKK13-14 billion.Company earnings from offshore wind farms in operations increased by 29% to DKK11 billion in 2018 due primarily to ramp-up at the Walney Extension, Race Bank, and Borkum Riffgrund 2 offshore wind farms. Ørsted also completed the farm-down of the 1,218 MW Hornsea 1 offshore wind farm in the United Kingdom, one of the largest ever renewable energy merger & acquisition (M&A) transactions, yielding a total EBITDA of DKK15.1 billion in 2018.Net profit amounted to DKK19.5 billion in 2018, the company’s best ever, with an increase of DKK6.2 billion over 2017’s figure.“2018 was a great year for Ørsted,” crowed CEO and President Henrik Poulsen in the company’s annual report. “We delivered our best financial result ever and continued our deployment of green energy, reaching 75% green energy in our heat and power generation. On a global scale, renewable energy will grow rapidly in the years to come. We are well positioned to take part in this significant growth.“By the end of 2018, our portfolio consisted of 12 GW of offshore and onshore wind farms and biomass-fired combined heat and power plants that are either in production, under construction or have obtained final investment decision (FID). Furthermore, we have projects with a capacity of 4.8 GW for which we have been awarded the construction concessions or entered into offtake agreements but are yet to make FID. In addition, we have a strong pipeline of projects under development. Towards 2030, it is our strategic ambition to reach an installed capacity of more than 30 GW renewable energy, provided that the build-out creates value for our shareholders. Contributing to this ambition, we raised our 2025 ambition for offshore wind from 11-12 GW to 15 GW.”More: Ørsted posts record profit in 2018last_img read more

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Syracuse uses offensive surges to rout Dartmouth, advance to NCAA tournament quarterfinals

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on May 12, 2013 at 6:59 pm Alyssa Murray scored a season-high 10 points as fourth-seeded Syracuse (17-3) opened the NCAA tournament with a 21-8 win over Dartmouth (11-8) on Sunday afternoon in front of 426 at SU Soccer Stadium.The junior attack Murray finished with five goals and five assists, strengthening her case as a Tewaaraton Award finalist and propelling the Orange to a quarterfinal matchup with No. 5-seed Florida (18-2) on Saturday a 2 p.m. in the Carrier Dome. The Gators defeated Denver 16-5 on Sunday.“I guess that’s why she’s a Tewaaraton finalist,” SU head coach Gary Gait said of Murray in the postgame press conference. “In big games – playoff games – you need to step up and make a difference, and she did that today. And led our offense, (she’s) done a very good job as a leader out there and making sure we’re organized and executing our plays and that goes a long way as well.”Freshman attack Kayla Treanor added five goals and two assists as SU cruised to a 13-goal victory against the Big Green, the widest margin of victory thus far in the NCAA tournament. The Orange also beat Dartmouth in the NCAA tournament last year, cruising to a 15-5 first-round victory.SU and Dartmouth played a fast-paced, high-scoring first half.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBig Green attack Hana Bowers opened the scoring about three minutes in before Syracuse answered with two goals. Fifty-three seconds after Bowers’ goal, SU midfielder Erica Bodt knotted the score at 1-1. Senior Bridget Daley gave the Orange its first lead of the day moments later.Dartmouth responded with three unanswered goals, turning the 2-1 deficit into a 4-2 advantage. Attack Sarah Byrne scored two goals to pull the Big Green in front. Jaclyn Leto extended the lead to 4-2 eight minutes into the game.From there, Syracuse took control. The Orange then went on a scoring burst, burying seven straight goals over the next nine minutes. Treanor scored twice and recorded two assists. Murray scored her first two goals while Bodt, Brenna Rainone and Devon Collins chipped in a goal apiece. With 9:17 remaining in the half, the Orange led 9-4.“Obviously, (I’m) very happy with the outcome of today’s game,” Gait said in the press conference. “I thought our team was patient. It wasn’t our best start… but I think we rebounded (and) refocused, started finishing our opportunities.”Bowers scored her second goal of the game to end the SU run with a goal at 7:42, making the score 9-5, but Murray completed her hat trick at the 6:18 mark and scored again on an assist from Kelly Cross more than a minute later to make it 11-5.In the final two minutes of the half, Gabby Starkey scored for the Big Green to make it 11-6 before Treanor answered with 18 seconds remaining in the half, and the Orange went into the break with a 12-6 lead.Syracuse opened the second half on an 8-0 run to put the game away. It took Dartmouth nearly 20 minutes to find the back of the net in the second frame and by then, it was too late. The Orange had reached the 20-goal mark for the third time this season.“… By the middle of the game (we) were creating many opportunities through our ride and through our defense,” Gait said in the press conference. “And (it) allowed us to get on a good run and really dominate the middle of the game. I think from top to bottom it was a good effort by everybody.”The SU ride limited the Big Green to 3-of-7 clears and just five attempted shots in the second half, denying Dartmouth a chance to stage a comeback. Alyssa Costantino replaced Kelsey Richardson in the cage in the second half and made three saves while allowing just two goals.The Orange now has a week to prepare for Florida, who defeated SU on March 2 in Miami by four goals.“I’m pumped. I think we came out of the Florida game this year pretty disappointed but we all kind of like shrugged it off and said, ‘We’ll win it when it counts,’” Murray said in the press conference. “It’s not going to come easy and we’re going to have to work really hard this week because I know Florida is going to be doing the same thing, but we’re hungry.”–Compiled by Phil D’Abbraccio and Josh Hyber Commentslast_img read more

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