Vermont Associates for Training and Development gets $1 million from US Dept of Labor

first_imgVermont Associates for Training and Development based in St Albans has received $1,058,111 as part of a US Department of Labor award of $225 million in additional funding for the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) in fiscal year 2010. This funding was provided in the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2010 to allow SCSEP grantees to immediately address unmet needs for employment and job training among low-income, older American workers.”This additional funding greatly expands SCSEP’s ability to serve older workers who face challenges in re-entering the workforce and attaining economic stability,” said Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis. “The U.S. Department of Labor is committed to expanding employment opportunities to even more low-income seniors and to enhancing their own career opportunities as they dedicate millions of hours to nonprofit and civic organizations.”This additional funding is a much needed opportunity for high-performing grantees to serve unemployed, low- income seniors. Successful applicants were chosen based on demonstrated need among the older worker populations they serve; the capacity to immediately and effectively expend the additional funds; and past performance in serving older workers.SCSEP is a community service and work-based training program for older workers. It provides part-time, community service-based job training for unemployed, low-income individuals age 55 or older.  Through this program, older workers have access to SCSEP services as well as other employment assistance available through the workforce investment system.Senior Community Service Employment Program grantees Grantee Funding Amount Alabama $824,520 Alaska $300,000 Arizona $657,582 Arkansas $645,921 California $4,239,993 Connecticut $540,589 Delaware $940,000 District of Columbia $286,431 Florida $2,916,761 Georgia $1,097,315 Hawaii $610,000 Idaho $263,152 Illinois $1,859,350 Indiana $1,294,993 Iowa $439,776 Kentucky $451,164 Massachusetts $1,077,144 Michigan $1,100,000 Minnesota $1,126,942 Missouri $1,086,800 Montana $280,000 Nebraska $330,000 Nevada $263,152 New Hampshire $263,152 New Jersey $1,395,850 New Mexico $278,363 New York $2,049,113 North Carolina $907,038 North Dakota $265,422 Ohio $2,158,322 Oregon $400,000 Pennsylvania $754,230 Rhode Island $266,260 South Carolina $673,719 South Dakota $335,000 Texas $2,743,288 Utah $330,808 Virginia $1,073,110 Washington $649,210 Wisconsin $1,266,754 AARP Foundation $37,873,312 National Able $3,188,511 Asociacion Nacional Pro Personas Mayores $4,705,414 Easter Seals $9,158,174 Experience Works $49,405,014 Goodwill $4,644,862 Mature Services $2,844,985 National Caucus on Black Aged $7,508,788 National Coalition on Aging $14,511,583 National Urban League $4,810,050 Quality Career Services $746,977 SER Jobs for Progress $13,743,000 Senior Service America $28,674,012 The Workplace Inc. $230,000 Vermont Associates for Training and Development $1,058,111 Institute for Indian Development $545,680 National Asian Pacific Center on Aging $2,910,30010-124-NATSOURCE U.S. Department of Labor. 1.29.2010. PRNewswire-USNewswire/ —last_img read more

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FARC Terrorist Plans Frustrated

first_imgBy Dialogo July 18, 2012 In the course of offensive operations, National Army explosives experts destroyed 10 mines of different kinds that belonged to FARC terrorists, in the departments of Northern Santander, Nariño, and Huila. Initially, the men of Task Force Vulcan recorded the location of a fan-type mine made of five kilos of R1 and six homemade mortar shells, each with two kilos of the same explosive. The munitions belonged to factions of the FARC’s Squad 33 and were found only meters from a school located in the sector known as La Raya, in the municipality of Tibú, Northern Santander. Separately, in a second tactical action, this one by Soldiers of Task Force Pegasus, the Military offensive resulted in the discovery of one mine, 20 kilos of ANFO, three kilos of pentolite, two kilos of shrapnel, and eight electric detonators in the municipality of Maguí, Nariño. The guerrillas of the FARC’s Front 29 failed in their violent plans, thanks to the rapid deployment of this Military unit. Finally, members of the FARC’s Squad 25 planted two improvised explosive devices by the side of a road used by people living along the San Marcos trail in the municipality of Colombia, Huila; the deadly traps were destroyed through the efforts of personnel from the 13th Land Combat Battalion ‘Cacique Timanco,’ assigned to Task Force Sumapaz.last_img read more

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Honduras: A United Central America Against Organized Crime is Needed

first_img Diálogo: During your presentation, and in one of the panels at CENTSEC, you thanked the United States and Colombia. Why? Diálogo: The Commander of the Military Forces of Colombia, General Rodríguez Barragán, believes the Colombian model of fighting criminal organizations is a model that can be exported. Do you also believe in this model where the armed forces work together with your country’s National Police to fight drug trafficking? These types of seizures are part of the efforts undertaken by the Honduran government and Armed Forces to reduce the number of homicides in the country. Gen. Álvarez: First, because we are partners both as Armed Forces and as nations, and we are very grateful for the support these two great countries – as well as other countries – have offered us. We could say the same about Chile and Brazil… But we have been closer to the United States and Colombia, mostly due to some agreements we signed with these countries that include a commitment and agreement to provide technical assistance related to infrastructure, equipment, cooperation, and personnel training and education. More specifically, we are working together in the fight against organized crime and other transnational threats. It is worth mentioning that we have had an agreement with the United States since 1954, and have counted on the commitment of the Colombian government and Armed Forces to our country. This is a very special recognition we make towards all those who leave their own country to be here with us – and we have quite a large number of Military personnel and police advisors providing this type of support here – given the expertise they have in fighting organized crime with very positive results. Gen. Álvarez: This activity results from the strategy designed by the government of Honduras through the development of an interagency security force that joins together all agencies involved in combating crime, organized crime, and drug trafficking. Plan Morazán was set into motion by bringing together all counter drug-trafficking activities in a coordinated way and managed by this force. Of course, our country’s president is determined to make sure this plan is carried out together with the Defense and Security Council, which is made up of the three branches of government, the Office of the Public Prosecutor, the ministers of Security and Defense and their directors, as well as the Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces, which meets every week. We are constantly meeting to see whether these objectives are being met and if our goals are being reached. In other words, it is an interagency commitment. This interagency force has six national agencies which are responsible for combating organized crime. In addition to the Public Security Forces, the National Police, and the Armed Forces, which are represented there, we count on the judicial branch, the Public Prosecutor’s Office, and the investigation authorities, so that we are all working and contributing together to the same efforts. All this has contributed to having the matters of crime and combating crime in the forefront of our minds. It is not just one single institution doing it, but all of us together. Through this interagency security force, we have attempted to create, or at least to propose judicial reforms that may benefit a larger part of the population when they are threatened by this type of crime. It will also contribute to putting an end to crime in general by adopting measures or amending sections of the legislation, or even proposing new legislation to face these criminal activities. That is what has taken place in Honduras. We have created judges to hear special crimes – such as extortion – and we created a system of judges with national jurisdiction. All these judicial measures and types of legislation have greatly enhanced our ability to combat crime. Diálogo: Is there anything else still that needs to be done, Gen. Álvarez? By Dialogo May 17, 2016 Diálogo: Can you talk about one of the methods you used to lower the homicide rate in Honduras so much in one year? Gen. Álvarez: We will continue this fight, and continue to lower the crime rate. Organized crime and drug trafficking are real giants, and we are not saying we have surpassed these giants. We have overcome many hurdles, we have moved forward in this fight, but we are not done yet, there is still a lot to do. We can only hope that after this period, the success of those involved in combating crime gives rise to more favorable conditions in which the state may engage in further efforts to improve the country’s social conditions. Some of these efforts are already being undertaken, but we need to work more in improving healthcare, education, and other social aspects to have a more equitable society instead of just having to concentrate on fighting crime. center_img Diálogo: So what you are telling us is that the Colombian Military are actually training the Honduran Armed Forces? To talk about this and other related topics, Diálogo interviewed Major General Francisco Isaías Álvarez Urbina, chief of the Joint Chiefs of Staff of the Honduran Armed Forces, during the Central American Security Conference (CENTSEC 2016) which was held in San José, Costa Rica, from April 6th-8th. During a recent presentation on Information Operations at U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), Honduras pointed out that just in the last two years, security forces found and destroyed seven drug labs in Honduras. Many of these were found in the region of Colón and processed cocaine. Gen. Álvarez: Each country has its own way of doing things, its own way of legislating, its own way of carrying out any required actions. And, of course, we have our own. We know that Colombia has had great results with the model they implemented which, thankfully, has at least led the country into signing some peace treaties. This is great for Central America, but as a matter of fact, there are other threats that haunt us. We hope this same model – which has been so successful for them – can also bring results to the other countries. Each country has their own truth, their own reality. It is a matter for each country to consider and review this model proposed by Colombia and which has worked very well for them, and we, in our own country can testify to its positive results, but this does not mean that all the other countries will necessarily think of it the same way. But we really should think about the model’s strengths; we have worked with this plan and obtained good results against organized crime in our country. We managed to lower the number of homicides. In one year, it has gone down 10 percentage points, and that is a major aspect to consider. Sure, we have major threats, but we also have great challenges and hurdles ahead of us. In fact, as the Armed Forces, we are doing exactly that: targeting our efforts towards these challenges. Gen. Álvarez: We have a training agreement, so there is an exchange of students from different educational levels and from the educational centers we have, i.e. Military, academic, and training centers. We offer training for their officers and some type of exchange program to train their Special Forces. This is all a result of agreements and treaties we have signed with the countries with which we cooperate for this type of assistance. Diálogo: Are you satisfied with the exchange of intelligence between Honduras and other countries, especially your neighboring countries? Gen. Álvarez: We always hold a very positive conference, which, actually, has always brought about significant results. It is the Conference of the Central American Armed Forces and Armies (CFAC), which is very good. At CFAC, we not only build confidence among the different countries and among the different armed institutions, but we also share information and training among the countries and their armed forces. Special centers have been implemented to train and prepare for natural disasters, and also to be able to carry a message of peace from Central America to the other countries through the international missions we participate in. This is why there is an environment of cooperation among the institutions and the countries of Central America. After all, we do have a unique issue, which is that we have to face many threats, and we can only do this in a united way. So we now have a system to exchange information, and we have finally moved away from the myth of mistrust. Now, there is trust among the countries. In fact, we conduct joint border operations, each on their side of the border, but we patrol together. We exchange not only information, but we constantly meet in order to discuss and assess threats that concern us all in Central America, because we know that if the countries work together, Central America will prevail in this fight.last_img read more

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AG announces $85M multi-state settlement with Honda

first_imgStatewide — Attorney General Curtis Hill announced, on Wednesday, a more than $85 million multistate settlement with Honda. The settlement concerns vehicle safety issues related to defects in frontal airbag systems in certain Honda and Acura vehicles that were sold in the United States.Due to these defects, Honda has recalled approximately 12.9 million Honda and Acura vehicles with suspect airbag inflators since 2008. This includes 189,397 vehicles in Indiana. Ruptures of these faulty airbags have resulted in at least 14 deaths and over 200 injuries in the U.S. alone. Honda also delayed in reporting the defects to consumers.Honda’s conduct allegedly violated several states’ consumer protection laws, including the Indiana Deceptive Consumer Sales Act. The company will pay more than $85 million to the states that sued. Indiana will receive more than $1.7 million of that money.Hoosiers who own a Honda or Acura vehicle are strongly encouraged to click here or call Honda’s toll-free customer service number at 888-234-2138 to see if their vehicle is subject to a recall. You may also check for open recalls by going to safercar.gov. All safety recall repairs are free at authorized Honda dealers.last_img read more

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