Don’t worry, Pacquiao says, Broner will make it to fight night in Vegas

first_imgNadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil “I believe Broner is a professional. He knows what is at stake in this fight,” Pacquiao was quoted by philboxing.com from his Hollywood training camp on Thursday. “I’m not worried about him. He will show up during the fight.”Broner, training in Florida, has been arrested before for battery and his hard-partying ways.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissBut the 29-year-old Broner vowed he is in his best shape ever and won’t get distracted by the whole incident. He even posted on his social media account on Friday that he “will shock the world on Jan. 19.”A lot is at stake for both fighters as it is going to be Pacquiao’s follow-up fight after his career enjoyed a massive revival following his knockout win over Lucas Matthysse in July. Manny Pacquiao is confident Adrien Broner will at least make it to their Jan. 19 fight in Las Vegas.The Filipino senator, training in earnest for his first fight in the United States in more than two years, expressed his view in light of the recent arrest of his American challenger over an outstanding warrant.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ After winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk LATEST STORIES Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title ‘Mia’: Rom-com with a cause a career-boosting showcase for Coleen Garcia Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college No.13 lucky for Orlando Bloom View comments Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. A win could pave the way for a rematch against Floyd Mayweather Jr., whom he fought in boxing’s richest fight ever, three years ago.For Broner, a four-division champ, it’s the biggest fight of his career and one that he hopes would define him after a string of lackluster performances the past few years.The fight has the makings of a big payday for both fighters, with tickets selling briskly.ADVERTISEMENT Leaving a final marklast_img read more

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Diplomat peacekeeper Saskatchewan First Nation awaits Poundmaker exoneration

first_imgWhen Milton Tootoosis thinks about the planned exoneration of Chief Poundmaker, he breaks down.A headman and councillor at Poundmaker Cree Nation, about a two-hour drive from Saskatoon, Tootoosis says absolving the chief of any guilt in a battle with federal forces almost 135 years ago makes him think about the resiliency of his people.“Our people went through a lot,” Tootoosis, choking back tears, said in a recent interview with The Canadian Press.“A lot of hurt. A lot of anger. A lot of mistrust.”Tootoosis has been part of an effort that he says has spanned years to press Ottawa to exonerate Poundmaker.That’s finally set to happen on Thursday when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visits the First Nation.“It’s not about the prime minister,” Tootoosis said. “This is about Chief Poundmaker. It’s about a great leader, a diplomat, a peacekeeper, who saved a lot of lives when he took action into his own hands.”Poundmaker, whose Cree name was Pitikwahanapiwiyin, was born in 1842 near Battleford, Sask.The First Nation that bears his name remembers his legacy as that of a political leader who was critical of Treaty 6 while it was being negotiated and spoke up for the plight of his people under the federal government.On May 2, 1885, in the Battle of Cut Knife Hill, Col. William Otter and members of the North West Mounted Police attacked a camp established by First Nations in the area.“The idea that there was a plan to exterminate us is unthinkable,” said Tootoosis, his voice shaking with emotion.The First Nations pushed the attacking forces back and Poundmaker intervened to stop warriors from going after the retreating troops.“He was unfairly labelled as a rebel,” said Russell Fayant, who teaches Indigenous history and Metis culture at the University of Regina.“He was a peacemaker who urged his people to have reserve and to not attack.”Poundmaker was tried in Regina for treason and was sentenced to three years at Stony Mountain Penitentiary in Manitoba.“Really, that conviction was about ‘let’s put an Indian in jail so that Canadians can see that we’ve sent somebody to jail,’” said Fayant.Poundmaker was released in 1886 because of poor health and died that same year.Tootoosis said while many elders and people in the region consider Poundmaker a peacemaker, history has painted him as a traitor.He and others believe the exoneration is a chance to set the record straight.“The broader public needs to know.”Fayant said it also forces Canadians to see another version of history and correct past misinterpretations.“What is the Indigenous side of the story?”Fayant believes Poundmaker’s absolution could reignite discussions about the legacies of other First Nations and Metis leaders from the 1885 NorthWest Rebellion and uprising. Those figures include Cree Chief Big Bear as well as Louis Riel.The ceremony on Thursday will include an apology from Trudeau.“Advancing reconciliation is a priority for the prime minister and our government, and a vital part of that work is addressing the injustices of past colonial governments,” said Eleanore Catenaro, spokeswoman for the Prime Minister’s Office.Last November, Trudeau apologized to the Tsilhqot’in community in British Columbia for the hanging of six chiefs more than 150 years ago and delivered an “statement of exoneration” in the House of Commons.While he believes the ceremony will be emotional and even surreal, Tootoosis said his First Nation still has grievances with the Crown over full treaty implementation.Poundmaker’s words about the treaties still ring true today, he said.“Attempts to exterminate our rights, our treaty rights, our inherent Aboriginal treaty rights, is ongoing.”Stephanie Taylor, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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