Library receives Badin Bible

first_imgThe University recently acquired a Bible belonging to Stephen Badin, the first Catholic priest ordained in the United States and a previous owner of the land that eventually became Notre Dame’s campus. The Bible currently is on display in the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections in Hesburgh Library.Catholic Studies Librarian Jean McManus, who played a role in the acquisition, said John Carroll, the first Catholic bishop in the United States, gave the three-volume Bible to Badin in the late 1700s. She said Badin took it with him in his travels. These included visits to Kentucky and Northern Indiana, where he made his land purchases and built the original Log Chapel.Emily McConville Kathleen Cummings, director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, said Badin gave the Bible to the Sisters of Loretto in Nerinx, Ky., who owned it for more than 200 years before only recently realizing its significance. She said the religious order had the books appraised and then contacted the Notre Dame, who purchased them with grants from the Library Acquisitions Fund and the Office of Research, with letters of support from history and American Studies faculty. The Sisters then brought the book to campus and gave it to the University at a special Mass in the Log Chapel in late June.Cummings said the Cushwa Center and the Library were interested in making the acquisition because the Bible linked two early American church leaders as well as other aspects of the early Church in the United States.“The way the Bible brings together the story of Catholics at every level – the leadership, the laity and religious – that’s enormously important,” she said. “The Fr. Badin connection makes it special, but the significance is far larger.”Margaret Abruzzo, an associate professor of history at the University of Alabama, who is studying the correspondence between Carroll and Badin as part of a project with the Cushwa Center, said the Bible also is significant because of its rareness. She said the Bible was printed by Matthew Carey, an Irish immigrant in Philadelphia. The edition, which was only 500 copies, was the second full Bible published in the United States and the first Catholic translation.“[Carey] was interested in kind of refuting the idea that Catholics didn’t read the Bible,” Abruzzo said. “He wanted to get the Catholic Bible into people’s hands because it was very important to Catholics at the time that they read the Catholic version of the Bible rather than the Protestant version.”Abruzzo said the Bible, which contains an inscription from Carroll to Badin, speaks to the closeness of their relationship at a time when the American Catholic Church was small and far-flung.“Badin would write questions to Carroll, and Carroll would write answers,” she said. “He was a source of advice for Badin.“When there were issues, Carroll would intervene, so sort of imagine something that is a very, very, very small version of any sort of diocese today. Imagine Carroll running the Catholic Church out of his garage. It’s that level of informality. They’re really trying to create a church from scratch.”McManus said the Bible, which shows signs of heavy use, will be on display this semester in Special Collections, and it will be the subject of a symposium on Oct. 10. She said the Bible will be available for scholars, who may study the book’s binding, marginal notes or relationship to Badin’s other writings and letters.“Connecting those letters to this time frame, and knowing where the Bible lived, that’s all of interest as well,” she said. “Its biggest use is just gesturing towards this big story of the very early 1800s [when] Catholicism was very much a minority religion. Things could have gone very differently, but this is a piece of the evidence for how it did go, especially that westward movement.”Cummings said faculty can bring classes to see the Bible, and researchers also can study the Bible’s translation and inscription.“Researchers who come –  Bible scholars, scholars of American history –  it will be a text that will be studied by them for a long time now,” she said. “A lot of people come to Notre Dame to do research on Catholicism, and so it’s a crossroads of source to scholars, so it will definitely get more exposure.”Tags: Badin Bible, Catholicslast_img read more

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Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones discusses the legacy of slavery in America

first_imgNew York Times journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones spoke about the foundations of her Pulitzer Prize-winning initiative, The 1619 Project, and the current movement for racial justice as part of the second installment of Notre Dame’s “Building an Anti-Racist Vocabulary” series Friday. Hannah-Jones, a 1998 Notre Dame alumna, also discussed her time at the University during the lecture held remotely over Zoom. Dory Mitros Durham, associate director of the Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights, moderated the event.To kick off the lecture, Durham asked Hannah-Jones about the start of the 1619 Project and how the year came to be so important to her and her work. Hannah-Jones thought back to an elective Black studies course she took in high school, and the effect it had on her.“[I] was angered by how much we had not been taught,” Hannah-Jones said. “In that one semester, I learned more about the history of Black Americans and Black people in the world than I learned in my entire K-12 education up until that point. And I understood, even then, that that erasure was intentional.”One of her teachers gave her a book entitled, “Before the Mayflower,” which discusses the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in 1619 to America. From that moment in high school, Hannah-Jones said, she became obsessed with that date and the lack of awareness in the United States toward its implications on society today. The 1619 Project is an initiative by The New York Times Magazine that examines the lasting consequences of slavery in America. The project was released in 2019, the 400th anniversary of the advent of chattel slavery in America.“Nothing about our country has been left untouched by the legacy of slavery, even though we don’t know it,” Hannah-Jones said about the aim of the project. “I really wanted us to do a project that would show that slavery is not in the past, that we are still living with that legacy.”Hannah-Jones continued by briefly tracing the ties of democracy, capitalism, the healthcare debate and the nation’s highway system to the institution of slavery and Black Americans’ resistance to subjugation. “[Black Americans are seen as] a problem to our democracy…I’m trying to really use history and the truth of history to turn that narrative on its head,” she said. “Through Black resistance: resistance to their enslavement, resistance to discrimination, resistance to racial apartheid, resistance to a country that was not a democracy that increased democracy abroad, that we ought to force [our founding ideals] to apply to all people; and that really has been the legacy of Black Americans.”Durham also asked Hannah-Jones to respond to the backlash that she received in regards to the 1619 Project. Hannah-Jones said that while she expected a negative response from the right-wing, she was surprised by the active effort of some historians to discredit her work. Nearing the end of her lecture, Hannah-Jones discussed the current resurgence in the Black Lives Matter movement that the country and posed the audience with a set of questions. “Will this moment just feel different or will it actually be different?” Hannah-Jones asked. “I think where my lack of hope comes from is that in our 401 year being on this land, why should we still have to be marking progress towards equality?”To conclude the lecture, Hannah-Jones offered words of advice to Notre Dame students on how to create a more accepting society for everyone. She said her first semester at Notre Dame was a challenging one, and encouraged students to be there for their peers.“What’s so important is not presuming, not letting your own assumptions about people’s backgrounds and what people are capable of,” Hannah-Jones offered. “If you really want to be a resource you have to be able to listen and have to be able to ask the questions.”Tags: Black lives matter, Nikole Hannah-Jones, Racism, slaverylast_img read more

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Hapag-Lloyd, DB Schenker Launching Eco-Friendly Initiative in Ocean Freight

first_imgGerman container shipping company Hapag-Lloyd and compatriot logistics services provider DB Schenker have launched a project aimed at cutting sulfur oxide emissions in ports.In order to reduce the impact of pollution, especially in Asian and Latin American ports, a “prestigious customer” switches all of its containers shipped by Hapag-Lloyd to low-sulfur fuel.Specifically, customers pay a voluntary surcharge on each of its containers shipped through these ports, having started in mid-2017. Such surcharge is used by Hapag-Lloyd to purchase the low-sulfur fuel.Customers receive a factual statement on the fuel change for all of their containers while DB Schenker supervises the transaction.As explained, the move goes beyond current regulation. While some regions in the world provide for 0.1% sulfur content not to be exceeded when at berth, many ports still do not have any such regulations and fuel is permitted to be burnt with sulfur contents of up to 3.5% to run vessel facilities during port stays for loading and discharge.“We are proud to enter with such prestigious companies in a ground-breaking health and environmental initiative,” Andrea Dorothea Schoen, Carbon Controller and head of DB Schenker’s climate protection program and project initiator, commented.“For us this a milestone in our environmental partnership – with the shipper and the carrier alike,” Schoen added.“We jointly can pave the way for better air quality and push sustainability on the oceans,” Thorsten Haeser, CCO of Hapag-Lloyd, pointed out.last_img read more

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