‘Encouragement Wall’ under construction at TRMC

first_img Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Patriot Health ZoneHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Skip Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Print Article Tupper Lightfoot to host Imagi-Con Virtual “If you can imagine it ….. “ And there are no limits to the imagination at the Tupper Lightfoot Memorial… read more Sponsored Content Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Book Nook to reopen By Jaine Treadwell “Hand-written notes and homemade cards would make very nice displays,” he said. “And, I’m sure these words of appreciation and thoughtfulness will be heartfelt.”Expressions of appreciation for the TRMC Encouragement Wall may be sent to: Amy Minor, 1330 US Highway 231, Troy, AL 36081. Email the author “Our hospital workers are on the frontlines of helping us cope with this pandemic,” Shirley said. “They are doing their best in the midst of the tremendous challenges wrought by the Corona Virus Pandemic. Like all of us in our daily lives, our hospital workers can’t interact with the people as they go in and out of the hospital; therefore, the public has few opportunities to express appreciation for their services.”Shirley said, as it was being discussed as to what could be done to let the hospital workers know how much they are appreciated, Amy Minor, TRMC chief clinical officer, suggested sending messages of encouragement to the local hospital workers.Minor’s idea was to invite the public to send letters or cards of encouragement to Troy Regional Medical Center via an ‘Encouragement Wall’ that would be located at the hospital where the employees could read the messages of encouragement, appreciation and prayer. Encouraging words lift spirits, lend support and lighten heavy loads.The Reverend Ed Shirley, pastor of Brundidge United Methodist Church, knows and understands the importance of encouraging words.As a chaplain at Troy Regional Medical Center, Shirley is aware of the challenges hospital workers are facing every day as they deal with the pressures associated with the coronavirus. Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits “The ‘Encouragement Wall’ is what we can do to let our hospital workers know how much they are appreciated and that what they do does not go unnoticed,” Shirley said.  “All those who appreciate the services and dedication of the TRMC healthcare workers are encouraged to share their appreciation on the Encouragement Wall.”Shirley suggested that the salutation be “To TRMC” or “To Troy Regional Medical Center.”So, the messages will be easily visible, the wording should be in a 28 font or larger and in short paragraphs. The Encouragement Wall is an opportunity for students, Sunday school classes, clubs, businesses, churches, individuals to show their appreciation, Shirley said. Published 10:17 pm Thursday, January 14, 2021 By The Penny Hoarder ‘Encouragement Wall’ under construction at TRMC Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson You Might Like The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Latest Stories Reverend Ed Shirley, Amy Minor and the Troy Regional Medical Center has set out to lift the spirits of the hospital staff by constructing an Encouragement Wall where people can write uplifting messages and leave cards.last_img read more

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Thursday’s QPR quiz

first_imgTest your Rangers knowledge by seeing how many of these five questions you can answer correctly.[wp-simple-survey-95]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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Americans Taking Half Measures on Energy Upgrades

first_imgMost Americans are attuned to the connection between the energy efficiency of their homes and the money it costs to operate them, and a few are inclined to spend at least some of their budget on energy-efficiency improvements. Those are some of the findings of Energy Pulse ’11, the seventh annual market study conducted by energy-focused advertising and consulting firm Shelton Group.The problem is, if consumers make any improvements at all, many take some but not all of the steps they need to significantly decrease in their energy bills.Compared to Energy Pulse results compiled in 2010, the 2011 study shows that more people — 23% vs. 14% in 2010 — rate their homes as inefficient, although the percentage (71%) who said they were using the same amount of energy as they did five years ago remained about the same.Some of the study’s more interesting — and, in some ways, puzzling — findings are pegged to consumers’ responses to utility bill increases, their perceptions of the reasons for the increases, and their opinions about what policy responses are needed to address rising energy costs.When good enough really isn’tIn 2009 and 2010, for example, consumers told Shelton Group that their bills would have to increase by $128 before they would make energy-efficiency improvements. For respondents in 2011, that threshold had dropped to $112, and yet they had embarked on fewer energy conservation behaviors and major energy retrofit improvements in 2011 — an average of 2.6 — compared to 2010.The study notes that four such improvements — the “magic number” of upgrades, according to the study — tend to produce meaningful energy savings, while anything short of that tends to yield mediocre results.Not that the 2.6 improvement level is necessarily an inexpensive commitment: homeowners cited window replacement and adding insulation as the top two improvements they had undertaken.But the study, which analyzes responses from 1,502 people via online and telephone inquiries collected between August 9 and August 22, also indicates that Americans are increasingly likely to blame oil companies (rather than themselves) for high energy prices, and that they now rank as top priorities domestic oil and natural gas production over development of alternative energy sources. What’s more, alternative energy sources, fuel efficient cars, and energy efficient homes were more likely to be cited as top priorities in 2010 than in 2011 by margins of 37.6% in 2010 to 28.3% in 2011, 24.6% to 17.9%, and 21.7% to 13.1%, respectively.The bottom line is that most Americans are still not knowledgeable about alternative energy sources, in spite of the millions of dollars spent by government programs to promote them. Many people, the study notes, don’t know what the most common fuel source is for electrical power (coal) or what steps to take to cost-effectively retrofit their homes. Their homes might be a bit leaky, but the attitude seems to be that they’re energy-efficient enough.The marketer’s angleFor Shelton Group’s purposes, of course, it is important to try to understand what motivates — or what might motivate — consumers to pay attention to energy-efficiency deficiencies and possible solutions. In its executive summary of the Energy Pulse study, the company points out that energy use and energy waste are, until the utility bill arrives, invisible features of a home’s operation. So Shelton Group is trying to come up with ways to make energy seem like less of an abstraction and more like a tangible asset in which consumers will have a stronger personal interest.Certainly a tripling of energy prices would generate more intense interest in energy and ways to reduce its use. But the study also suggests tying messages that encourage energy efficiency to consumers’ core values.With that in mind, the analysis cites possible approaches to four kinds of consumers:For absolutists, the energy message should be “about doing the right thing, which will give them a sense of righteousness and relief.”For individualists, “we should appeal to their need for status and financial gain, which will give them a sense of security and achievement.”For humanistic thinkers, “we should connect energy efficiency to being part of a movement or a community, which will fulfill their need for personal connection.”Finally, for systemic thinkers, the emphasis should be on “themes of innovation, possibility and problem solving should resonate and spark feelings of integrity and competence.”The trick, the study points out, will be to come up with ways to effectively communicate key concepts to those four types of consumer. The authors of analysis suggest that the federal government, whose energy policy has not been sharply focused, could be an ideal resource, but its message must be coherent and consistent:“Our studies have shown for years that Americans expect government and companies to fix some of the pressing issues of the day — including energy — and they’re looking for leadership. How can we expect them to have a personal energy plan if there’s no example for them to follow?”last_img read more

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