Belles celebrate freedom

first_imgIn honor of the 225th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution’s ratification yesterday, the Center for Academic Innovation at Saint Mary’s College hosted “Constitution Day 2012: Reflections on the Letter and the Spirit of the U.S. Constitution.” Associate professor of communication studies Michael Kramer coordinated the day, including a panel in the Haggar College Center that featured veteran reporter and communication studies professor Susan Baxter, history professor Edith Miguda and political science professor Sean Savage. Baxter reflected on the importance of the Constitution in terms of her experiences as a reporter. Baxter said it was the right of the public to be present at city council meetings unless certain requirements and processes are followed to close the session. Baxter said at one meeting she refused to leave, and the mayor told her the next time she refused she would be arrested. “I told [the mayor] to prepare the sheriff because I’m not leaving,” Baxter said. “I thought ‘Wow, I’m going to jail for the Constitution.’” Baxter said the right to be present at public meetings is important to the freedom of speech. “Many times these public meetings are not important, but when they are, people need to know,” said Baxter. Miguda also emphasized the importance of protecting the Constitution. “The spirit of the Constitution is the spirit that lets us defend it,” Miguda stated. “The U.S. Constitution is exemplary in how we [Americans] defend it.” Savage spoke about how Americans have different ways of interpreting the document. “No matter how Americans differ [the constitution] is supposed to be the one thing that we have in common,” Savagedsaid. “It unites the U.S. in a basic document but it sustains an ongoing debate.” Savage said the Constitution is strong and that unlike the United States, other countries will often go through and review the wording of their respective constitutions. “We, [the United States], don’t do that,” Savage said. “We only added about 17 amendments since [the Bill of Rights]. …Maybe [the Constitution] unites us because we are always disagreeing about what it means.” Contact Sarah Swiderski at [email protected]last_img read more

Continue reading

Virus precautions, uncertainty mark opening of Ohio St camp

first_img LIVE TV First Published: 7th August, 2020 08:14 IST WATCH US LIVE Associated Press Television News Last Updated: 7th August, 2020 08:14 IST Virus Precautions, Uncertainty Mark Opening Of Ohio St Camp Ohio State opened preseason training camp Thursday with strict coronavirus protocols in place and under a cloud of uncertainty about whether the revised 10-game season will even be played at all FOLLOW UScenter_img COMMENT Written By Ohio State opened preseason training camp Thursday with strict coronavirus protocols in place and under a cloud of uncertainty about whether the revised 10-game season will even be played at all.Rules requiring testing, masks, frequent disinfecting of equipment and social distancing — at least as much as is possible with around 120 players on the field — were observed at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center as the Buckeyes gathered for the first of 24 practices leading up to their Sept. 3 opener at Illinois.With schools already having abandoned their nonconference schedules because of the pandemic, the Big Ten released a schedule — along with a long list of required medical protocols — that includes 10 games per school, evenly split between home and away. Whether there will be any fans in 105,000-seat Ohio Stadium is still an open question.And there’s still a chance the season will be scrapped, depending upon virus trends and consultations with government officials. That will be determined in the coming weeks. Some smaller conferences have already done away with fall sports.Coach Ryan Day said he talked to his team about all those issues.“We don’t know what’s coming tomorrow,” Day said after practice. “Certainly anything’s possible. We all know that, but we’re really not focused on that.”The Buckeyes began working toward whatever comes next after being confined to their homes for a quarantine and then having summer workouts in Columbus disrupted by some positive coronavirus tests, although the school won’t say how many there were or provide names. Players will be tested twice a week during preseason camp.“It’s great to see the guys, just be around the team and feel the energy and be able to work out and practice together,” senior defensive end Jonathon Cooper said. “I think that’s doing a huge thing for everybody’s mental health.”Quarterback Justin Fields was a Heisman Trophy finalist last year after leading Ohio State to a 13-1 record and getting the Buckeyes to within one game of the College Football Playoff final. He’ll start this season as one of the Heisman favorites.Fields said he hasn’t considered opting out of what likely will be his final season before entering the NFL draft in the spring, even with the risk associated with playing this fall.“I don’t have any concerns about what’s going on here at Ohio State necessarily,” he said. “My only concerns that pop up in my head are what are they doing at other schools? I think one of the biggest concerns going around with the team is, what happens when all of the students come back to campus and students aren’t really worried about it, they’re doing what they usually do if the pandemic wasn’t going on? I think there are a lot of things in this situation that we can’t control.”Along with Fields and Cooper, the team this week elected as captains linebackers Justin Hilliard and Tuf Borland, cornerback Shaun Wade and offensive linemen Wyatt Davis and Josh Myers.Hilliard said it must be impressed upon all players that the way they behave and follow protocols could mean the difference between whether the season is played or not.“That’s a new addition, you know responsibility that we as leaders have to keep track of,” he said. “I think it’s important, especially now, as students will start coming back to let people know that we can’t have that normal lifestyle.“Especially some of the younger guys, it’s not fair to them because they just got to college,” he said. “It’s going to be tough for them to be locked away but they have to understand — we have to help them understand and hold them accountable — that we can’t live that same lifestyle we usually do in order to have a safe season. So it’s going to be a challenge.”Image credits: AP SUBSCRIBE TO USlast_img read more

Continue reading