Ethanol Fueling Indiana’s Bicentennial Torch

first_img By Gary Truitt – Sep 11, 2016 Ethanol Fueling Indiana’s Bicentennial Torch Home Energy Ethanol Fueling Indiana’s Bicentennial Torch Indiana corn farmers are helping power the Indiana Bicentennial Torch Relay as sponsors of the E85 fuel keeping the torch burning brightly as it travels through Indiana’s 92 counties over the next 35 days. “Indiana corn farmers are proud to support the Indiana Bicentennial Torch Relay, to celebrate our state’s 200 years of history while drawing attention to the important role corn farming and ethanol plays not only in rural Indiana, but also to Indiana’s overall economy,” said David Gottbrath, a farmer from Washington County and president of Indiana Corn Marketing Council.The Indiana Bicentennial Torch Relay began September 9 at Indiana’s first capital of Corydon in Harrison County and ends in Indianapolis on October 15.  The torch used in the relay was designed by a team at Purdue University and is fueled by an ethanol-blended fuel, a fuel that starts with corn from Indiana farmers.  “The E85 fuel used in the torch is the same fuel that can be found at more than 200 fuel retail locations across Indiana and can be used by the 500,000 Flex Fuel Vehicles on the road here in Indiana,” said Gottbrath.  The Indiana Corn Marketing Council, the state’s corn checkoff organization, is a sponsor of the Indiana Bicentennial Torch Relay to help raise awareness of the benefits of Indiana-grown, Indiana-produced ethanol. The torch will travel an average of 97 miles per day, stopping in each Indiana county.At each relay stop, Hoosiers will have an opportunity to take a selfie photo with the torch with a caption that reads “Let’s Clear the Air,” to promote the environmental and economic benefits ethanol brings to Indiana and its residents.  “Ethanol not only contributes to Indiana’s economy and benefits local communities with jobs and tax revenue, it also contributes to a cleaner environment; and that’s why we’re excited to have it fuel the relay’s torch,” said Gottbrath.Indiana corn farmers have been an integral part of the state’s history over the past 200 years, contributing to Indiana’s economy and culture. Indiana is home to 14 ethanol plants and will produce one billion gallons of ethanol this year. SHARE Previous articleOur Food System is Broken, but Not in the Way You Might ThinkNext articleEPA Decision on Dicamba Expected Late in 2016 Gary Truitt Facebook Twitter SHARE Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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What Russia wants

first_imgWhat does Vladimir Putin really want? It may sound like an easy question, or maybe a setup for a bad joke. But according to John Beyrle, a former U.S. ambassador to Russia who spoke Monday evening at a Harvard Institute of Politics roundtable on that nation and its leader, it’s a crucial question for the next White House occupant to understand.What Putin wants, said Beyrle, is respect, and he can choose startling ways of getting it.“Our nuclear relationship with Russia is the main existential issue,” Beyrle told the Harvard Kennedy School panel on “Challenges for the Next President: The Crisis With Russia.” “Putin has boasted about Russia’s nuclear might, so the taboo of using one’s nuclear arsenal as a bragging point has been broken. That should give us all pause. Most people wouldn’t understand the details of a modern nuclear arsenal, but they do understand a senior Russian official who boasts the ability to reduce the U.S. to rubble.”As moderator and former CNN Moscow bureau chief Jill Dougherty pointed out, circumstances in Russia can change by the day, with the weekend’s Syrian ceasefire and legislative election as the most recent examples. Yet the panelists agreed that the next U.S. president needs most of all to understand Russia’s overall mindset.Panelist Maxim Boycko, a visiting lecturer in economics at Harvard, pointed out that the main lesson of last weekend’s legislatives election wasn’t that Putin seized more power, but that only about half of the populace voted. That indicates a certain apathy setting in during the Putin era. “I wouldn’t say that Putin is the problem or the solution; he is a fact. If you look at the Yeltsin and the Gorbachev eras, there was a sense that the Soviet Union was opening up. That’s not something we see anymore.”The two principal U.S. presidential candidates have far different approaches to Russia. Donald Trump has made headlines by speaking well of Putin, while Hillary Clinton has taken more of a hard-line, “almost a macho approach,” as Dougherty put it. Yet the panelists emphasized that the choice doesn’t boil down to one candidate wanting to appease Russia and one wanting to confront it. Beyrle said Putin wants to be understood, not necessarily to be coddled. And while Trump has proclaimed admiration for Putin, that’s not the same thing as offering a coherent strategy.It wouldn’t hurt, Boycko suggested, for the two nations’ leaders to have a personal relationship. “It’s very hard for me to comment on Donald Trump, but the personal aspect is quite important. The question is how the two interests can be aligned with each other, and that starts with a deep understanding of the other side — what it is that the other side needs from this relationship. Whichever candidate can do that better would have the best chance of improving the relationship.”Beyrle noted that Putin’s ties with the United States have been somewhat aggressive dating from his first meeting with President Obama, when he laid out a “tremendous list of grievances.” The narrative of Putin’s reign, Beyrle said, involves righting wrongs that he believes were done when the Soviet Union fell apart, its satellite nations drifted away, and NATO strengthened. “He and the people around him want a say in the major international issues, and they feel they’ve lost that.”Beyrle rejected the notion that Russian leadership would necessarily be friendlier to Trump’s approach.“I can’t discern any coherent foreign policy out of Mr. Trump,” Beyrle said, and he suggested that the Kremlin can’t either. “The things Mr. Trump says may be pleasing to them, but they don’t know anything about his policies. Secretary Clinton by contrast has a well-defined policy that has been spelled out. It’s likely that the Kremlin would rather deal with that than with the unknown quantity of Trump.”In a question-and-answer session afterward, Dougherty discussed another contributing factor: the television network RT (formerly Russia Today), and its rather dark impact on the Russian mindset. “The anchors are young, so it looks like a regular television network. But I believe their mission is to undermine and attack Western democracy and the belief that it can work. The message is ‘Everybody lies. Maybe we lie, but the Americans lie too.’ So it’s meant to undermine faith in anything. That’s dangerous and nihilistic. But in the context of social media, it works.”last_img read more

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Shohei Ohtani gets mixed results in spring training debut with Angels

first_img Angels win on walk-off in Shohei Ohtani’s spring training debut Angels’ Luis Valbuena looks for good start after strong finish in 2017 In one of the most eagerly anticipated spring training games in Angels history, Ohtani faced the Milwaukee Brewers in front of a Tempe Diablo Stadium crowd of 6,019 and television audiences on both sides of the Pacific. The Angels estimated that about 100 media members were there to chronicle the performance.They saw a pitcher who clearly has tremendous talent, with a fastball topping out at 97 mph in this outing. They also saw a pitcher who clearly is far from a finished product.Both of which were exactly what the Angels expected.“I think that he did enough to where we certainly learned some things,” Manager Mike Scioscia said. “He and Martin worked some things out. I think it’ll be a step forward for him next time. He threw all his pitches. Some were what we expect him to be, and some he just lost his release point on. It’s a step forward for sure.”Ohtani faced seven batters and got four outs, with two strikeouts. Ohtani gave up an unearned run in the first inning, which began with a leadoff double by Jonathan Villar. Villar got ahead 3-and-1 and then blasted the ball over the head of center fielder Eric Young Jr. Will Shohei Ohtani’s success in Japan continue with Angels? Former teammates, Japanese baseball officials think so Broxton added: “He’s got great stuff. He has the ability to be a major league baseball player, for sure. I only saw fastballs, but from the breaking balls I saw earlier, it looked pretty good. In spring training, it’s hard to get a good judge on how the guy is feeling or if all of his stuff is locked in. There’s definitely more there. He’s going to improve.”Ohtani’s next start is not set yet, but it will likely be either Friday or Saturday. Before then, he is going to make his debut as a hitter. Scioscia wouldn’t say when that would be, beyond “early next week.”Whenever that happens, Ohtani said he’s eager to take his next step.“I had a lot of fun out there today,” he said. “I am excited to hit and pitch again. I want to keep getting better.”RAMIREZ UPDATEJC Ramirez threw 25 pitches in two innings worth of live batting practice, his second such session of the spring.“Everything is good,” Ramirez said. “Everything feels normal. I’m ready to go. I can’t wait to pitch in a game.”Ramirez said he’s scheduled to start against the San Francisco Giants on Thursday. Ramirez is coming back from stem-cell therapy to repair a damaged ulnar collateral ligament suffered last August.The Angels have Ramirez on their depth chart as a starter, but he could also be used out of the bullpen if he doesn’t make the rotation. He is out of options, so he’ll either be in the majors or on the disabled list. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Shohei Ohtani: Who is the Angels’ new guy? PreviousThe Angels’ Shohei Ohtani heads to the outfield after his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani in the dugout after his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani throws to the plate during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsThe Angels’ Shohei Ohtani throws to the plate during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani throws to the plate during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani makes his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani makes his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani makes his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani before is greeted by teammates before his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani looks to the outfield during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers on Saturday at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe, Ariz. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, with a runner at third in the first inning, during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani watches Jonathan Villar’s ground rule double during the first inning of his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani checks the runner during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani makes his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani listens to the National Anthem with his teammates before his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani backs up a throw during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani throws to the plate during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani is welcomed into the dugout after the first inning during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani greets owner Arte Moreno before making his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani heads out to start the second inning during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani heads out to start the second inning during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani throws to the plate during his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani is taken out of the game by Manager Mike Scioscia in the second inning of his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani in the dugout after his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani warms up before his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani in the dugout before his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani in the dugout after his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani heads to the outfield after his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani in the dugout after his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 27The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani in the dugout after his Cactus League debut against the Milwaukee Brewers at Tempe Diablo Stadium in Tempe on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan/Orange County Register/SCNG)ExpandTEMPE, Ariz. — Shohei Ohtani was exposed to one of the most fundamental rules of pitching in the majors on Saturday.“Fastball down the middle … big league hitters are going to take advantage of that,” catcher Martin Maldonado said. “That won’t be the last homer that he’s going to give up.”Although the Angels’ new phenom from Japan gave up two runs, including a homer, in his Cactus League debut, there were enough positives sprinkled throughout his 31-pitch outing to leave him, his manager and his catcher feeling good about the day.“I like what I saw,” Maldonado said. “I think he’s going to progress in his next start.” Villar was one of the five batters that Ohtani started with a ball, which was his primary issue for the game.“As long as you start to get ahead in counts, it will be a whole different story,” Maldonado said.Ohtani walked Ji-Man Choi later in the first, and he threw a wild pitch. The run scored on a throwing error by Maldonado, who was trying to nail Choi taking second on the wild pitch. Ohtani escaped that inning, but then he gave up a homer to Keon Broxton to start the second. He then retired Nick Franklin on a flyout and his outing was over.Ohtani said he had gotten a little cold during the bottom of the inning, while the Angels were batting. In Japan, pitchers can throw in front of the dugout to stay loose while their team is at bat.Ohtani said he’s going to have to learn to deal with that, as well as make sure he gets ahead in the count. He also said his slider wasn’t as good as he’d like, but he was satisfied with his curveball and splitter.“Besides the results, I had a lot of fun,” Ohtani said, speaking through his interpreter in the temporary tent constructed to handle the media crush. “I think it went well. … Every year it’s hard to get into a rhythm at this point. It felt just like any other year. I think I’ll be able to adjust.”The Brewers also seemed to believe Ohtani will have better days ahead.“His splitter is really good,” Brewers outfielder Brett Phillips said. “You can tell that’s what he goes to to strike guys out. That’s what he did to me. It’s very good offspeed. … He definitely has a chance to be really good. I got to see it all.”Related Articleslast_img read more

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