‘Shaking of hands acceptable’ priest

first_imgWhatsApp Advertisement Facebook Twitter Print Linkedincenter_img THE shaking of hands between worshippers at local Catholic churches is quite acceptable by the authorities, despite warnings on the transmission of swine flu’ from person to person.Rev Fr Paul Finnerty, diocesan secretary, was responding to calls from some massgoers to the Limerick Post, for the immediate suspension of the practice.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up He confirmed that the diocese had been in touch with the HSE on the matter, and was assured there was no need to change policy.“I consulted with the HSE regards suspending the sign of peace in the form of a handshake at Masses. The position of the HSE was that there is no need to end the practice”. He insisted, however, that those who are feeling ill should not attend Mass.He continued: “I have noted the HSE’s concerns as to the dangers of persons with flu’ symptoms attending at Mass and other church services.“This constitutes the greatest danger of all in terms of spreading disease. It is advisable that persons with symptoms of flu’ not to participate in church services during their illness”.Despite the continuation of the practice of handshaking, he assures those who attend Mass that it will be reconsidered should the HSE’s position alter.He concluded: “We will continue to liaise with the HSE on this matter and should they have a change of attitude, I will then be informing parishes”.There are some churches in the diocese who have volunteered to drop shaking hands during Mass.One lady told the Post that she considered it inappropriate to continue with the practice at the present time.“All sort of precautions should be taken to prevent the spread of swine flu’ .We are constantly being warned of the dangers and to be on the alert”. NewsLocal News‘Shaking of hands acceptable’ priestBy admin – September 17, 2009 609 Email Previous articleLocal economy in recovery modeNext articleLast chance to impress ? adminlast_img read more

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Sabre will slash maintenance costs

first_imgLONDON UNDERGROUND expects savings of £10m a year on its maintenance budget, thanks to the development and implementation of software from ICL and Workplace Systems. Sabre, ’Site Access Booking for Railway Engineering’, offers engineers the facility to co-ordinate work to minimise clashing operations, and improve utilisation of resources.Planning work in the tunnels, escalators and platforms of underground station layouts is complex because of severe restrictions to access – if work is proceeding in one area, it may prevent equipment and workers getting to other sites. Sabre carries detailed information on all station layouts, and these are cross-referenced with worksite bookings to automatically flag-up clashes. Alternative schedules are generated to avoid conflicts.Sabre was delivered in four stages, which addressed the needs of the eight line planning managers, LU’s Critical Resource Agency, engineering train and plant movements, and maintenance information for management analysis and monitoring.The impact has been to make a vast reduction in the quantity of paperwork, while focusing attention on the importance of planning and booking-in time for work to be carried out.The system includes a database which stores details of the booked work, with a facility to input details of work actually carried out. This can be used to assess the performance of contractors, to encourage them to turn up when they have work booked, avoiding rebooking and consequent disruption from work over-running.ICL, Winnersh, Great BritainReader Enquiry Number 141last_img read more

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