Trade War Only Getting Worse for Soy Farmers Fearful for their…

first_img By Hoosier Ag Today – May 7, 2019 Facebook Twitter In what could easily be described as “worst case” for America’s soybean growers, the Trump Administration has confirmed what the industry has feared for months: Heavier tariffs on Chinese goods are planned for Friday, May 10.“This is a predicament for soy growers,” said Davie Stephens, a grower from Clinton, Ky., and president of the American Soybean Association (ASA). “We understand that Mr. Trump and his Administration have broad goals they want to achieve for our country, but farmers are in a desperate situation. We need a positive resolution of this ongoing tariff dispute, not further escalation of tensions.”U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said Monday he plans to move forward with President Trump’s threat on Sunday to increase the tariff rate from 10 to 25 percent on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods, citing China’s back-pedaling on prior commitments during talks in Beijing last week.China’s retaliation against U.S. soy farmers has chilled exports to the U.S.’s most important foreign customer. China has purchased only 5 million metric tons (MMT) of its 20 MMT ‘good faith’ promise, and the original March 1 deadline for concluding negotiations has come and gone. The market has fluctuated with each development during the negotiations, including Trump’s social media posts over the weekend.“After so many threats and missed deadlines for concluding negotiations, this ongoing uncertainty is unacceptable to U.S. farmers,” Stephens continued. “With depressed prices and unsold stocks forecast to double before the 2019 harvest begins in September, we need the China market reopened to U.S. soybean exports within weeks, not months or longer.”ASA urges the Administration to hold off on additional tariffs and rapidly conclude negotiations with China, including lifting the existing Section 301 tariffs in exchange for China removing its retaliatory 25 percent tariff on U.S. soybeans.Stephens concluded, “Soybean farmers have demonstrated great patience as the Administration has sought to negotiate a better trading relationship with China. However, our patience is wearing thin as prices remain low and the tariff dispute drags on. The financial and emotional toll on U.S. soybean farmers cannot be ignored.”Growers have been reeling for almost a year now, after the President first imposed a 25 percent duty on $50 billion worth of Chinese goods in July 2018, and later, a 10 percent duty on an additional $200 billion worth of Chinese products, which resulted in the retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods. That 10 percent duty was scheduled to jump to 25 percent the end of last year, but President Trump delayed the hike after a meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in December, with the countries agreeing to hold off for 90 days, and then indefinitely during the ongoing negotiations until this week.Source: American Soybean Association Facebook Twitter Trade War Only Getting Worse for Soy Farmers Fearful for their Future Previous articleHoosier Ag Today Seeking Ag Sales ProfessionalNext articleWheels Not Turning in Southwest Indiana Fields Hoosier Ag Today Home Indiana Agriculture News Trade War Only Getting Worse for Soy Farmers Fearful for their Future SHARE SHARElast_img read more

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Bringing back hope

first_img Professor’s book explores the struggles of low-income students at elite schools With their many scholarly resources, universities can play a major role in tackling the growing problems of income inequality and declining social mobility that are creating deep divisions and eroding social capital in the U.S., says Harvard President Larry Bacow.“Universities have an important role to play, not just by shining a light on the structural issues, which we need to address, but also by developing new technologies and industries that can be the engine of economic growth,” Bacow said Thursday night in conversation with Bridget Terry Long, dean of the Graduate School of Education, at the annual Malcolm H. Wiener Lecture hosted by the Institute of Politics.“Inequality is corroding society,” said Bacow. “The growing inequality and the lack of opportunity for those at the bottom of the economic strata is destroying hope, and when hope is gone, society changes in a big way.”Bacow shared his views on the role universities can play in addressing economic opportunity and inequality with a packed classroom at the Harvard Kennedy School. Over the past two decades, universities have opened their doors to a broader cross-section of students, including those from low-income families, as part of efforts to address inequality and social mobility, he said. But there is more work to be done.“In the last 10 years, we’ve recognized that it’s not enough just to admit people,” Bacow said. “We need to think hard about how we can really level the playing field, not just by giving people the opportunity for education but also by giving the opportunity for the same education while they are on our campus.”Experts are growing concerned about the decline in social mobility in the U.S. Children born in the 1940s had a greater than 90 percent chance of doing better than their parents, but for children born in the 1970s, that chance dropped closer to 50 percent, said Long.Bacow talked about Pontiac, Mich., where he grew up, to describe how that decline is breeding hopelessness. In the late 1960s, he said, Pontiac had three General Motors factories and people knew they could have a comfortable middle-class life, with children almost guaranteed a better life than their parents. That’s not the case anymore, Bacow pointed out.“When I graduated from high school in 1969, the population was 82,000,” he said. ”Now, it’s about 55,000. … One of the problems in Pontiac is that people don’t have hope. One of the things that economic mobility gives people is hope — the notion that the future is going to be better than the past.”The conversation was disrupted early on by a group of 30 students from Divest Harvard. When the students refused to leave the stage and allow the event to continue, HKS dean Doug Elmendorf relocated the discussion.After the talk resumed, Bacow referred to the protest. “Universities are places where people express opinions and they often express opinions sharply,” he said. “We have to expect that, for they will be dull places indeed if we went a semester or a year without some kind of protest, so I’m glad our students proved me right.”For Jorge Calderon, a student at the Extension School who was in the audience, Bacow’s talk was a chance to learn that vanishing social mobility is a challenge to many countries and that universities can play a part to improve economic opportunity for all.“When Bacow talked about Pontiac, that resonated with me,” said Calderon. “I come from a small town in El Salvador that had a cement factory where everybody worked, but when the factory closed and the civil war began, we lost everything. I immigrated here looking for opportunity, and being at this University … opens up many opportunities for a better life.” Rethinking inclusion Relatedcenter_img “In the last 10 years, we’ve recognized that it’s not enough just to admit people. We need to think hard about how we can really level the playing field, not just by giving people the opportunity for education but also by giving the opportunity for the same education while they are on our campus.” — Larry Bacow Programs work to aid individuals, opening vistas that many in struggling communities have never seen The costs of inequality: Across Harvard, efforts to improve liveslast_img read more

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Former Cricketer Bhabani Prasad Saikia Expired

first_imgOur Sports ReporterGUWAHATI: Former first class cricketer Bhabani Prasad Saikia expired in Guwahati in wee hours today. He was around 82 years old and left behind his Wife and a Son.A former Ranji Trophy Player, who played 2(two) matches in the championship, was also a former Registrar of Gauhati High Court. Assam Cricket Association and Veteran Cricket Association of Assam condoled the death of Saikia.Also read: Vidarbha enter Ranji Trophy quarters; MP, Punjab close inlast_img

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