Tony Poderis on when to appoint a first fundraising director

first_img Howard Lake | 26 July 2006 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Management Tony Poderis on when to appoint a first fundraising director US fundraising consultant and writer Tony Poderis has added a new article to his Raise-funds.com website addressing the issue of when should an organisation appoint its first fundraising director.Tony, a long-time contributor to the UK Fundraising Forum, writes regularly on practical issues affecting charities, boards and fundraisers. His style is positive, based on his considerable fundraising experience, but also blunt. In his latest article he argues: “if a non-profit organisation is beginning to ask whether it needs a professional development director, it probably should have hired one months, even years ago.”He adds that “the biggest mistake non-profits make in hiring their first development director is waiting until the board, executive director, and other key personnel have arrived at a consensus that one is needed NOW.” Consequently, “an organisation that waits until it is necessary to hire a development director has waited too long.” Advertisementcenter_img Tony offers a useful checklist to use with the organisation’s fundraising plan to help it establish when a fundraising manager will become an essential requirement. But he points out that there are no universal indicators of when this will be: it all depends on the individual organisation.“When Should a Non-Profit OrganizationHire its First Development Director?” is just one of dozens of considered, practical discussions of some of the key issues in fundraising that Tony shares at no charge in his Fundraising Forum Library.  20 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Continue reading

How Many Mortgages Are Now in Forbearance?

first_img How Many Mortgages Are Now in Forbearance? Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Forbearance 2020-08-14 Christina Hughes Babb The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and expiration of expanded unemployment benefits continue to represent significant uncertainty for the weeks ahead, according to researchers.The number of mortgages in active forbearance dropped below the 4 million mark for the first time since May, according to new data from Black Knight Inc.’s McDash Flash Forbearance Tracker.As of August 10, 3.9 million homeowners—or 7.4% of all active mortgages—were in forbearance, representing $852 billion in unpaid principal. This was down by 71,000 cases of mortgage forbearance from the previous week. Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, 73% of loans in active forbearance had their terms extended.Over the past week, forbearance activity was in complete decline: 10% fewer new forbearance requests, almost 40% fewer renewals and 20% fewer removals from one week earlier. Black Knight observed that renewals are lagging from earlier in the month based on the number of expirations the occurred during the end of July, but added those numbers would normalize into August.Black Knight also reported that approximately 5.4% of all government-sponsored enterprise-backed loans and 11.5% of all Federal Housing Administration and Department of Veterans Affairs loans are in forbearance plans., along with 7.9% of loans in private label securities or banks’ portfolios.Among the investor classes, active forbearances were in downward motion across every major niche. Portfolio-held and private labeled security loans saw the quantity of decline in terms of volume (-36,000) and on a percentage basis (-3%). GSE loans in forbearance registered an 18,000 (-1%) drop and FHA/VA loans fell by 8,000 (-1%).The estimated monthly principal and interest advances on forbearance plans were $4.8 billion, compared with $4.9 billion one week earlier. The estimated tax and insurance advances on forbearance plans were $1.8 billion, which was unchanged from the prior week.However, Black Knight was unwilling to affirm the data was evidence of an unstoppable trend, adding at the conclusion of its data report that “the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic around much of the country and the expiration of expanded unemployment benefits last month continue to represent significant uncertainty for the weeks ahead.” August 14, 2020 3,357 Views Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Tagged with: Forbearance Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago  Print This Post Previous: HUD Grants State, Local Officials Receive More Fund-Spending Flexibility Next: Asurity Announces Launch of RiskExec’s Proprietary Fair Servicing Module Related Articles Share Savecenter_img About Author: Phil Hall Sign up for DS News Daily The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / How Many Mortgages Are Now in Forbearance? Phil Hall is a former United Nations-based reporter for Fairchild Broadcast News, the author of nine books, the host of the award-winning SoundCloud podcast “The Online Movie Show,” co-host of the award-winning WAPJ-FM talk show “Nutmeg Chatter” and a writer with credits in The New York Times, New York Daily News, Hartford Courant, Wired, The Hill’s Congress Blog and Profit Confidential. His real estate finance writing has been published in the ABA Banking Journal, Secondary Marketing Executive, Servicing Management, MortgageOrb, Progress in Lending, National Mortgage Professional, Mortgage Professional America, Canadian Mortgage Professional, Mortgage Professional News, Mortgage Broker News and HousingWire. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Foreclosure, News The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

Continue reading

Artful balance

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rx3A_Y30JwA” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/rx3A_Y30JwA/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Students can pursue bachelor of arts and master’s in five-year program “With music, there’s a balancing of different qualities and you have to have control and finesse and technique,” Li said. “There’s always a fine line between too much control and technique with being overly emotional, overindulgent. With literature, it’s not always an outpouring of emotion. It never goes overboard. It’s on the cusp of going overboard, but it never does.”Li’s adviser, James Engell, said the gifted young musician reminds him of a friend from his own undergrad days. The Gurney Professor of English Literature and of Comparative Literature lived at Eliot House in the early ’70s and he would have breakfast with Olympic figure skater John Misha Petkevich ’71.“John and George exemplify the kind of very talented students who take on a schedule so demanding that it requires utter focus and discipline,” said Engell, who taught Li in a Romantic poetry course last year. “There’s danger in becoming an automaton — sometimes people gifted in one area don’t have the time for other areas — but George, like John, has made a great effort.”Engell said Li never asked for special treatment — “no excuses, no extensions, he just plowed through” — and described his attitude toward English studies as “adventuresome.”“He’s someone who isn’t afraid that he doesn’t have complete confidence that he’ll master it. He goes ahead and does it anyway,” Engell said. “He’s not in the top of his class in grades, but he’s open to the experience. That’s hard to teach. That’s the kind of thing that has huge payoffs later on in life.”Though Li may see his musical future more clearly, he feels just as passionate about his English studies. The balance is an education in itself.“I’m here to become a better person overall, and to understand other people,” he said. “It’s important to try to learn about other people’s emotions and sympathy. It’s helpful in term of being a human being.”George Li – Chopin Piano Competition 2015 This article is the first in an occasional series on the impact of humanities studies in and out of the classroom. George Li ’18 does most of his English assignments on an airplane.That’s where the joint Harvard-New England Conservatory student often can be found, en route to concerts or piano competitions. And while the study space may be less traditional — and more public — than Widener Library or his room at Winthrop House, the challenge agrees with Li.“It’s very rewarding for me,” he said. “In trying to balance studying and work, and being prepared to perform, I’m juggling this double life.”The 21-year-old from Lexington expected as much when he applied to Harvard, saying he knew a broader education (as opposed to a conservatory-only) would “help me become a better person.”In choosing English as a concentration, Li took on a daunting area of scholarship — and not just because he’s so often studying on the fly.“English is not my forte and I’m definitely struggling, but it’s been great,” he said. “Literature helps me understand music because they’re so interrelated in feeling human sympathy and compassion and understanding all aspects of humanity.”His playing has shown the results. Li won the 2016 Avery Fisher Career Grant for piano and last year took the silver medal at the International Tchaikovsky Competition. Meanwhile, in courses on the modern novel and Romantic poetry, he immersed himself in the language of Coleridge, Dostoevsky, Eliot, Shelley, and Wordsworth.“With music, there’s a balancing of different qualities and you have to have control and finesse and technique.” — George Li“What struck me the most was how similar these writers were, inspired by nature or any random moment that was seemingly insignificant, but they made such a personal connection to it,” said Li. “They were able to convey such great emotions, and that’s what I’m trying to achieve — to feel the personal connection between myself and the music and be inspired. I’m trying to reinterpret what the composer has written, but, in a way, I’m creating a new kind of interpretation of the music.”Li said his love of music comes in part from an appreciation of its showmanship. The son of Chinese immigrants, he first played in public at age 9. As an in-demand soloist, his performances have included a State Dinner at the White House with President Obama and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and engagements with esteemed international orchestras such as the Lucerne Symphony and the St. Petersburg Philharmonic.His study of literature, though, has come to reveal a more reserved creativity. Related Harvard and Berklee to offer dual degree Li performs in the 17th International Fryderyk Chopin Piano Competition in 2015.last_img read more

Continue reading