Six Nations: Ireland 26-3 Wales

first_imgNOT FOR FEATURED Perfect timing: Rob Kearney and Leigh Halfpenny catch a high ball at the same timeBy Sarah Mockford at Aviva StadiumThe match in 30 secondsIreland outplayed Wales in every facet and head to Twickenham in a fortnight with a chance of winning the Triple Crown. The defending champions looked lacklustre and had no answer to Ireland’s driving lineout, which delivered tries for Chris Henry and Paddy Jackson, while their high penalty count allowed Johnny Sexton to steadily build a comfortable lead.Ireland – Tries: Henry, Jackson. Cons: Sexton, Jackson. Pens: Sexton 4.Wales – Pen: Halfpenny.He can kick it: Johnny SextonPost-match bulletin–       This is Warren Gatland’s heaviest Six Nations defeat as Wales coach and he described it as “one of the most disappointing performances since I’ve been Wales coach”.–       Wales paid the price for ill-discipline, conceding 15 penalties.–       Possession (49-51) and territory (50-50) was an even split – but Ireland were able to do a lot more with it.–       Dan Lydiate and Jamie Heaslip topped the tackle charts with 12 while Rob Kearney made the most metres with 79 and Toby Faletau the most carries with 15.–       Ireland kicked the ball from hand 46 times compared to Wales 27 and made four line breaks to Wales’ one.– Joe Schmidt admitted that Ireland’s limited game plan was due to the expected downpours that didn’t materialise until late on.–       Scott Williams is in a sling after hurting his shoulder in the tackle on Brian O’Driscoll while Dan Tuohy has fractured his forearm. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A fit-again Davies returns in place of the injured Williams, James’s superior scrummaging gets him the nod ahead of Gethin Jenkins while Warburton and Tipuric both play in a bid to improve Wales’ fortunes at the breakdown. Leap of faith: Paul O’ConnellWhat’s next?–       Ireland, particularly their pack, will take great confidence from this win and will need to produce an equally capable performance against England. Their driving lineout is fast becoming a huge threat to opposition teams and Joe Schmidt will want Peter O’Mahony’s breakdown work to be as effective at slowing down England’s game as Wales’.–       Given the forward dominance, Ireland should be looking to do more with the ball. There was a lot of kicking – and in fairness Sexton mixed up his kicks well – but keeping the ball in hand on occasion would bring more variety to their game and that is something Schmidt is sure to be looking for.–       Wales will surely be spending a lot of time working on the breakdown over the coming two weeks. They were not able to keep possession for long periods in Dublin and can’t risk giving a dangerous France back-line turnover ball. They also need quick ball themselves, or their own backs become redundant – as they were for large parts of the game here.–       They also need to address their driving lineout defence – they struggled to get a handle on Ireland’s dominance in that area and other teams will be looking to target them too – and their discipline.RW’s proposed Ireland XV v England:Rob Kearney; Andrew Trimble, Brian O’Driscoll, Gordon D’Arcy, Dave Kearney; Johnny Sexton, Conor Murray; Cian Healy, Rory Best, Mike Ross, Devin Toner, Paul O’Connell, Peter O’Mahony, Chris Henry, Jamie Heaslip.After such an impressive performance, an unchanged – and experienced – team should do well at Twickenham. Martin Moore is pushing Mike Ross hard for the tighthead spot and if Tommy Bowe fires on his return from injury he could come in for Trimble.RW’s proposed Wales XV v France:Leigh Halfpenny; Alex Cuthbert, Jonathan Davies, Jamie Roberts, George North; Rhys Priestland, Mike Phillips; Paul James, Richard Hibbard, Adam Jones, Andrew Coombs, Alun Wyn Jones, Sam Warburton, Justin Tipuric, Toby Faletau.last_img read more

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Two website journalists summoned for questioning about Sarkozy video

first_img May 10, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information News Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU June 2, 2021 Find out more “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says Organisation Reporters Without Borders is disturbed to learn that Pierre Haski, the editor of the French news website Rue89, and one of his reporters, Augustin Scalbert, have been summoned for questioning by an anti-crime unit, the BRDP, on 1 April in connection with a video of President Nicolas Sarkozy talking informally to TV studio staff before an interview without realising he was being recorded.“We condemn this escalation by the police and judicial authorities in cases involving the protection of journalists’ sources,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Nicolas Sarkozy promised to for reinforce the protection of sources during his 2007 presidential election campaign but nothing has so far been done. Not only is a bill concerning this matter still awaiting its second reading in the National Assembly but there has also been a steady increase in judicial attempts to get journalists to reveal their sources.”The video showed President Sarkozy in the studio of France 3’s 19/20 programme on 30 June 2008 expressing irritation with a technician for his perceived impoliteness. It became available almost immediately on Rue89 and other websites and was seen by hundreds of thousands of Internet users.After France 3 filed a complaint alleging “theft, receiving stolen property and piracy” on 8 July, the Paris prosecutor’s office immediately asked the BRDP to investigate. At the same time, the France 3 management launched an internal investigation. June 4, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on France RSF_en News Reporters Without Borders is disturbed to learn that Pierre Haski, the editor of the French news website Rue89, and one of his reporters, Augustin Scalbert, have been summoned for questioning by an anti-crime unit, the BRDP, on 1 April in connection with a video of President Nicolas Sarkozy talking informally to TV studio staff before an interview without realising he was being recorded. March 26, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two website journalists summoned for questioning about Sarkozy video to go further FranceEurope – Central Asia Receive email alerts FranceEurope – Central Asia RSF denounces Total’s retaliation against Le Monde for Myanmar story Newslast_img read more

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Lake Avenue Church: About 7500 Hours 2014

first_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday 4 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Faith & Religion News Lake Avenue Church: About 7500 Hours 2014 By MATT BARNES, Mission Service Coordinator All Saints Church Published on Wednesday, August 6, 2014 | 2:48 pm EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff “The Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve.” – Matt. 20.28A server at a restaurant, a worship service, servant leadership, self-serve soda machines. We use the word service a lot but what does it mean in the context of following Jesus and why is it important?Serving is essential to following Jesus. Jesus said He came to serve and He set an example of service for His followers to emulate. We should be about the things that Jesus was about – and Jesus was about service.Why is serving so important? For many reasons. But let’s focus on one. Just imagine how our reputation would improve with those who don’t know Jesus yet if we all followed His example of service.On the weekend of August 8-10 we are all going to have an opportunity to serve!Our hope is that each of us will join together with our small groups, classes, and/or families and serve together. Be led by the Spirit! Use your imagination! The end result? We hope by 6 pm on August 10 we hope to have given 7500 hours of service to our friends and neighbors! Then we’ll celebrate together with dinner on the West Plaza, near the parking lot. If you have any questions please contact me at [email protected] or (626) 817-4810.Are you up for the challenge? Are you ready to serve where you work, live, and play?Visit http://7500hours.lakeave.org for more information and service project ideas.Lake Avenue Church, 393 N. Lake Avenue, Pasadena, (626) 844-4700 or visit www.lakeave.org. Community News Top of the News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy center_img Subscribe faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Herbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTop 9 Predicted Haircut Trends Of 2020HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyEverything You Need To Know About This Two-Hour ProcedureHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeauty Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website last_img read more

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Ten-minute coronavirus test for $1 could be game changer

first_img“Africa still has that luxury, unlike Europe and North America,” she said.That’s where Mologic comes in. Using technology from home pregnancy and malaria tests, its saliva and finger-prick kit could be ready for sale from June for less than $1 apiece. In Africa, they will be manufactured in Senegal by diaTropix, a newly built diagnostics manufacturing facility run by the director of the Pasteur Institute, Amadou Alpha Sall, who has led training around the continent for coronavirus testing.“We are ensuring that these tests are made accessible at the cost of manufacture,” said Joe Fitchett, medical director of Mologic, which received a $1.2 million grant from the U.K. government to develop the test.The current COVID-19 tests, known as PCR tests, detect the genetic material of the pathogen in a laboratory process that can take several hours and cost over $400 in some private facilities.Since the mysterious illness emerged in China late last year more than 150,000 people have been infected around the world, shutting swathes of the global economy as countries lock down cities and ban travel. The US, with ample resources and medical technology, has come under fire for slow testing amid a surge in cases.Although the spread of the virus has been relatively slow in Africa, the number of patients climbed last week in Egypt, Senegal and South Africa, bringing the total caseload to more than 300 in at least 20 countries, with most patients having recently traveled to Europe.Mologic and the Institut Pasteur have joint capacity to produce 8 million tests a year and plan to sell them directly to African governments as well as the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization and the WHO, Fitchett said. Mologic is seeking to acquire a manufacturing facility to produce an additional 20 million tests annually, initially in the UK and later in Africa.Training is being ramped up too. Fifteen African laboratories received guidelines last month from the Senegalese institute to diagnose the virus, while additional training was held in South Africa for another 12 African countries.In Nigeria, health officials are trying to speed up diagnosis by training staff at other public laboratories, said Chikwe Ihekweazu, the head of Nigeria’s Centre for Disease Control. The country is in talks with partners and donors to acquire more kits after confirming two cases of the virus.“A quick test could be a game changer for us,” said Ihekweazu, adding that symptoms similar to malaria, which is widespread in Africa, could complicate diagnosis early on.Before 2017, Nigeria had only one laboratory to test for influenza, inside a refurbished, 48-foot container in the capital. Since then, the lab has been moved to a three-story building known as the National Reference Laboratory.“We are working non-stop,” said molecular bio-engineer Ndodo as he inspected new machinery inside the modern reference laboratory. “We need to keep working. We will get over this.”Topics : Already exhausted from testing for monkeypox and Lassa fever, Nigerian molecular bio-engineer Nnaemeka Ndodo had to work well past midnight earlier this month to find out if six Chinese construction workers were infected with the coronavirus.Ndodo had to collect samples from a hospital an hour away in Nigeria’s capital, Abuja, then wait for six hours to get the results in what’s one of only five laboratories able to test for the virus in Nigeria, Africa’s most populous nation, with about 200 million people.In about three months’ time, UK-based Mologic Ltd., in collaboration with Senegalese research foundation Institut Pasteur de Dakar, could shorten that wait to 10 minutes with a test that will help a continent with the world’s most fragile health care system cope with the pandemic. With few resources and staff, authorities are racing to contain the spread of the disease in Africa, which accounts for 1% of global health expenditure but carries 23% of the disease burden, including hundreds of thousands of deaths each year from malaria, HIV/Aids and tuberculosis.Thirty-six of 54 countries on the continent have the capacity to test for the coronavirus, but a spike in cases could overwhelm laboratories. Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed said Sunday he struck a partnership with Chinese billionaire Jack Ma to distribute between 10,000 and 20,000 test kits and 100,000 masks per African country, as well as newly developed guidebooks for treatment.Separately, the Ethiopia-based Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expects to distribute 200,000 tests across the continent next week, mostly from Berlin-based TIB Molbiol GmbH, according to the group’s head of laboratory, Yenew Kebede. It’s also sending more than 100 experts across Africa.“There is no shortage of lab tests in Africa, but what we want is the faster, cheaper test to quickly confirm if there is an outbreak and contain it before it gets bigger,” said Rosanna Peeling, chair of diagnostics research at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.last_img read more

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Jobless and desperate: The post-lockdown reality for many

first_imgFood bank ‘shame’ To fill the fridge and feed her student son, daughter and grandson, Sonia Herrera has no choice but to rely on the food bank.”It makes me a bit ashamed to ask for help,” the 52-year-old Honduran, who lives in the Spanish capital, said.People look, and there’s the guilt of wondering if “maybe others need it more”, she added.As a domestic worker, she earned a monthly 480 euros until her employers in central Madrid let her go, the day after Spain’s lockdown began.As an undocumented migrant, she cannot claim state aid.The whole family lives on about 600 euros in unemployment benefit that her daughter Alejandra, 32, receives after losing her job as a cook in a nursery which had to close during confinement.With a few savings too, they scrape by. But little pleasures “that you notice when you lose them”, such as occasionally going out for an ice cream, are gone and their cat Bella’s operation had to be put back.”The end of the month scares me more than the virus. You have to eat after all,” Herrera said. ‘Pushed to the bottom’ Mexican tour guide Jesus Yepez has been sleeping at a homeless refuge after being evicted from his rented accommodation in the capital’s historic center early this month.”I was born on a cozy mattress in Coyoacan [a bohemian district of Mexico City where Frida Kahlo and Leon Trotsky lived] but the vagaries of life have pushed me to the bottom,” the 65-year-old said.Before coronavirus, he would earn 500 pesos (about $22) leading an hour-long tour.But Mexico’s museums and galleries shut at the end of March as high season began and Yepez has struggled like many others in the tourism sector, which makes up 8.7 percent of GDP.Early on, he had some savings, but they’re gone and tourists are not yet back.His qualifications in architecture, international relations, English and French are of little use to him now.”All that I ask is to get through this and find a retirement home to grow old in dignity. I’m not ill, just tired of life.”Topics : Alone at the bar The barstools at Cafe Fili, the Mediterranean restaurant in Washington where Zac Hoffman works, are now mostly empty, as customers prefer to sit outside.”I don’t feel like I’m back to work. I don’t have bar guests. The restaurant’s never full ’cause it can’t be,” the 28-year-old said.Restaurants have been Hoffman’s life since he took his first job as a prep cook aged 15.But six years ago he realized that he preferred working behind the bar, where the customer is always close and making new friends — never a bad thing as a candidate for the local area council — is easy.He used to make up to $40 an hour, mostly from tips.But after a period of unemployment when businesses shut down as the pandemic intensified in mid-March, he now makes at most $25 an hour.What worries him most, though, is whether local businesses will have to close again, in which case he believes most would never reopen, or whether he or his coworkers will be next to get the virus.”All of our interactions are kind of governed by this anxiety of possible death, which is not really where we want to be,” he said. AFP met people in France, Mexico, Ukraine, Spain, Colombia and the United States, who already are, or fear they soon will be, without work and spoke of their despair, sacrifices, dashed hopes and fears for the future. Forced career about-turn With dreams of becoming a pilot, 26-year-old Colombian Roger Ordonez had been working as a flight attendant for Avianca since 2017 but studying to get his wings.”You get used to a certain lifestyle because you have a good salary and you can travel,” he said.He’s visited various countries in the region and the US in recent years and took his family for their first trip abroad.At the end of March, at the airline’s request, he agreed to take two weeks’ unpaid leave, which was then extended.Two months later, he learned that his temporary contract would not be renewed after it ended on June 30.In the meantime, Avianca filed for bankruptcy.Ordonez has had to abandon his pilot studies and can no longer help his family out with the bills.”I’ve looked for work but it’s difficult because my sector is tourism and it’s the most affected by COVID-19,” he said.He’s thinking of retraining, perhaps in management, trade or sales, he says. Many workers’ lives have been abruptly upended by the coronavirus pandemic, as job losses in tourism, air travel, food and drink or other industries hit those both on fixed contracts and in the informal sector.From employees making a comfortable living, to others just scraping by, people around the world are confronting anxiety over how to feed their families and shame at being forced to seek handouts amid growing poverty.The IMF says that world GDP is set to plunge 4.9 percent this year from the crisis sparked by the global pandemic, and warns that low-income households and unskilled workers are most affected. center_img The married, father of two made a monthly 1,800-2,600 euros ($2,062-2,978), and in a really good month could sometimes earn 4,000 euros.But as soon as France locked down, the work stopped and the family is surviving on state aid of 875 euros.He hasn’t been able to meet his monthly rent of 950 euros since March, nor the electricity bill for three months. Although he’s managed to keep up his 250-euro car loan repayments, the family’s holiday in the south west is now off the cards, he said.”We’ve lost everything… Psychologically you have to cope with it,” he told AFP. But his wife is suffering from depression and he is just holding out for September when he hopes business will resume — virus permitting. Living in fear Marie Cedile dreads hearing that she’ll be among those to lose their jobs at French shoe company Andre, which filed for bankruptcy on March 21 before going into receivership.Under the only takeover offer on the table, just half of the 450 staff would be kept on.She’s worried that at the age of 54 and having spent all her working life at Andre, she’ll have trouble finding a new job.”I have customers whom I fitted for shoes when they were little and who come today to get their children fitted,” she said.One of her two daughters died aged 29 last year of brain cancer, she said.”Fortunately I had my work, relationships with the customers, that helps.”After 30 years she still earns the minimum wage — 1,250 euros a month.Just over 1,000 euros goes on rent for their flat in the Morangis suburb of Paris.”You need two salaries to cover it. My husband is unemployed but he’s younger than me, he should find a job,” she said.”I’ll take anything if I’m laid off, even if it means cleaning houses, I’ll find something.” ‘Total shock’ Ukrainian IT specialist Natalia Murashko, 39, was due for a promotion after four years as a senior quality-control engineer at American travel company Fareportal.When the pandemic hit, about 15 employees were dismissed on March 31 but she thought her job was safe as her bosses had reassured her.However, the very next day, she was given two weeks’ notice. “I thought at first it was a stupid April Fool’s joke,” she said.”It was a total shock.”Murashko’s computer skills placed her in a rarefied group that can make several thousand euros a month in Ukraine, compared to an average salary in the country of around 300 euros.  She was able to afford a cleaner, trips to the beautician and new clothes.From one day to the next, her life changed beyond recognition.Now she’s living off savings and odd jobs. Last month, the mum of two teens, who also looks after her 73-year-old mother, made 600 euros.Her job hunting has been fruitless and she limits her spending to the absolute minimum.”One thing I haven’t cut is my psychotherapist,” she said. Since losing her job, she’s had trouble sleeping and suffers anxiety. Plunged into precariousness “I’ve slipped into a state of insecurity,” says Frenchman Xavier Chergui, 44, who for 10 years has been a temp maitre d’, filling in at Paris restaurants when they were short staffed.last_img read more

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