Boeing Unveils Wingman Drone That Could Fly Alongside Fighter Jets

first_img Boeing has partnered with Australia’s military to develop a combat drone — almost as big as a fighter jet — to support manned aircraft on dangerous missions.The Boeing Airpower Teaming System, known as “Loyal Wingman” and unveiled at the International Airshow at Avalon, Australia on Wednesday, is designed to “complement and extend airborne missions through smart teaming with existing military aircraft,” according to a Boeing press release.BREAKING NEWS: Check out our new smart, reconfigurable unmanned aircraft that will protect & project airpower! #TheFutureIsBuiltHere #AirpowerTeamingRead more about the Boeing Airpower Teaming System: https://t.co/Gabz4x9oBv pic.twitter.com/K1Nnvc0jl6— Boeing Defense (@BoeingDefense) February 26, 2019The  craft will provide fighter-like performance, measure 38 feet long and will be able to fly more than 2,000 nautical miles. With integrated sensor packages onboard, Loyal Wingman will protect piloted aircraft, supporting intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions and electronic warfare, said Boeing.Artificial intelligence will also allow the craft fly independently or in support of manned aircraft while maintaining safe distance between other aircraft.The Loyal Wingman is designed to protect piloted aircraft and carry out radar jamming and surveillance missions. (Photo Credit: Boeing)“With its ability to reconfigure quickly and perform different types of missions in tandem with other aircraft, our newest addition to Boeing’s portfolio will truly be a force multiplier as it protects and projects air power,” said Kristin Robertson, vice president and general manager of Boeing Autonomous Systems.According to the Wall Street Journal, Australia wants the drone to protect warplanes such as the Lockheed Martin Corp. F-35 fighter, which is also a key aircraft for the U.S.  The project is Boeing’s largest investment in a new unmanned aircraft program outside the United States.A prototype is expected to take its first flight in 2020, Boeing said.More on Geek.com:NASA Astronoaut Eric Boe Pulled From Boeing’s Starliner Test FlightYou May Soon Be Able to Fly Drones Over a Crowd, At NightUK Airports Invest Millions in Anti-Drone Tech Climate Activists Use Drones to Shut Down Heathrow Airport Next MonthUPS Wants to Bring Drone Deliveries to U.S. Hospitals Stay on targetlast_img read more

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