Clippers, Lakers join for moment of unity and protest during anthem

first_img How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersThe Lakers and Clippers linked arms, the Clippers with their heads bowed. LeBron James raised his right fist during the final notes of the anthem, a recorded rendition delivered by the Compton Kidz Club.In a statement, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said he was supportive of the collective gesture, long considered exceedingly controversial and in violation of the league policy: “I respect our teams’ unified act of peaceful protest for social justice,” he said. “And under these unique circumstances will not enforce our long-standing rule requiring standing during the playing of our national anthem.”The participants did more than kneel, of course: After warming up in black T-shirts that read “Black Lives Matter,” many players displayed socially relevant, NBA-approved messages on the backs of their game jerseys where their last names usually go. Included among them: “Black Lives Matter,” “How Many More,” and “I Am a Man.”Coaches wore NBA Coaches for Racial Justice patches, a reference to the NBA Coaches Association’s panel committed to police reform and voting rights. And Lakers Coach Frank Vogel paused before taking questions from reporters pregame to pay homage to iconic civil rights activist John Lewis, who died July 17 and was laid to rest Thursday.Earlier, Clippers Coach Doc Rivers — who, for several days has been rocking a ballcap that reads: “VOTE” — shared some of his memories of spending time with Lewis, noting that his work continues. Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers “What’s amazing,” Rivers said, “is when you think about right now, some of the stuff that John Lewis was fighting for, we’re still fighting for.“Voter suppression right now is at an all-time high … we have a group of people who are trying to get people not to vote. Latinos, Blacks and young people are the targets. That’s who they’re trying to get not to vote. It’s amazing when you think about how long ago that was, and yet we’re still fighting that fight.”The players had their say too.Several lent their voices to the pregame montage that played in the arena and on the nationwide TNT broadcast. Clipper Chris Paul, the NBPA President, was among those featured on screen, and among the NBA and WNBA representatives on a recent conference call with former first lady Michelle Obama.“I don’t care what happens as far as these games, or life comes back to normal,” Paul said on the video. “Things aren’t gonna change until we make them change.”After his team’s 106-104 victory, Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell brought a bulletproof vest with him to his postgame interview. He explained that the vest — which was adorned, he told Bleacher Report’s Taylor Rooks, with the names of people killed by police — was a visual cue representing the “hands up, don’t shoot” mantra. “We’re sick and tired of being afraid,” Mitchell said.Paul George said he was proud to be a part of the pregame protest.“It was great to play for something, we stood up for something, we knelt for something,” he said. “This league is all about unity and can’t say it enough, I love being part of it, it’s a brotherhood, this league, and at the same time, we know we can change things as well.”The Lakers’ LeBron James walked off the floor and, on TNT, talked to America.“The game of basketball has always been bigger than just the ball and the rim, 10 guys on the floor with referees,” James said. “It’s an opportunity to use this platform to be able to spread a lot of positive, a lot of love throughout the course of the whole world. We understand what’s going on in society right now, and we’re using this NBA platform, as players and coaches, as organizations, to continue to stand strong on that.”Related Articles Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions NBA players made it clear on reopening night: They are not going to take their eye off the ball.Yes, the games officially are afoot in the bubble at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Florida, but the guys out there dribbling have not shut up.On the contrary: They’re doing what they can to direct the focus toward the groundswell of protest against social injustices in America.On Thursday, before both the Lakers defeated the Clippers 103-101 and the Pelicans-Jazz game preceding it, players lined up on the sideline near the on-court “BLACK LIVES MATTER” lettering and knelt together — alongside coaches and game officials — during the national anthem. Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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Sterling praised after debut

first_imgRaheem Sterling won praise from manager Roy Hodgson after the Liverpool youngster made his England debut against Sweden.The 17-year-old from Harlesden was involved in the first England goal in their 4-2 defeat and caused the Swedish defence problems before being substituted late in the game.“I thought the debutants were good, all of them did fine and I am certainly a wiser man than before this game going into 2013,” said Hodgson.“We were undone by some individual brilliance and maybe a bit of inexperience,” he added. 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Mutations Accelerate Each Other’s Damage

first_imgAs reported in our 10/14/2004 entry, mutations do not work in isolation; even the good kind usually conspire against the host.  This fact has been largely ignored by neo-Darwinists.  Some researchers at the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, Israel, writing in Nature,1 tested the interaction of mutations (epistasis) on proteins.  They found, in short, that harmful mutations usually accelerate the loss of fitness above what would occur in isolation.  Some organisms exhibit robustness against mutations, though, as in well-known cases of antibiotic resistance.  The team tested the robustness of E. coli while mutating a gene for a lactamase (TEM-1) that confers some resistance to ampicillin.  They found that, at best, the organisms could hold out at a threshold level of fitness only temporarily.  Beyond the threshold, death was speedy and inevitable.  This was even after they removed the bad mutations:Subjecting TEM-1 to random mutational drift and purifying selection (to purge deleterious mutations) produced changes in its fitness landscape indicative of negative epistasis; that is, the combined deleterious effects of mutations were, on average, larger than expected from the multiplication of their individual effects.  As observed in computational systems, negative epistasis was tightly associated with higher tolerance to mutations (robustness).  Thus, under a low selection pressure, a large fraction of mutations was initially tolerated (high robustness), but as mutations accumulated, their fitness toll increased, resulting in the observed negative epistasis.  These findings, supported by FoldX stability computations of the mutational effects, prompt a new model in which the mutational robustness (or neutrality) observed in proteins, and other biological systems, is due primarily to a stability margin, or threshold, that buffers the deleterious physico-chemical effects of mutations on fitness.  Threshold robustness is inherently epistatic—once the stability threshold is exhausted, the deleterious effects of mutations become fully pronounced, thereby making proteins far less robust than generally assumed.Their study also casts doubt on the ultimate survivability of so-called “neutral” mutations.  These initially have no obvious effect on the fitness of the organism.  This may be due to backup copies of a gene, suppressors of the mutated gene, and other mechanisms the cell uses to mask the damage.  Eventually, however, the threshold is exceeded and the system collapses just as rapidly as a cell toppled by interacting harmful mutations.    The authors of this study gave no indication that beneficial mutations can add up and help an organism.  In fact, they failed to say anything about evolution that would provide hope for progress.  By contrast, they offered a “new model” that sounds distinctly anti-evolutionary: cells are programmed to hold off the damage of mutations as long as they can, but will ultimately collapse under a mutational load.  They concluded that “proteins may not be as robust as is generally assumed.”  Their real-world experiment on bacteria showed robustness to mutations only to a certain point, then everything raced downhill:Thus, theory and simulations have predicted a tight correlation between robustness and epistasis.  Our work provides an experimental verification of this correlation and proposes a mechanism that accounts for it.  Our model implies that any biological system that exhibits threshold robustness, or redundancy robustness, is inevitably epistatic.  In such systems, mechanisms that purge potentially deleterious mutations, such as recombination (through sexual reproduction and other mechanisms) are of crucial importance, as they help to maintain this threshold.  In this way, recombination, threshold robustness and negative epistasis may be interlinked—each being an inevitable by-product of the other.They seem to be saying not only that mutations are not sources of positive fitness gains, but other proposed mechanisms like recombination are only stopgap measures to protect against the death spiral that would result when “randomly drifting proteins” gang up (negative epistasis) to cause a terror attack in the organism.1Bershtein et al, “Robustness-epistasis link shapes the fitness landscape of a randomly drifting protein,” Nature 444, 929-932 (14 December 2006) | doi:10.1038/nature05385.It is extremely important that followers of the creation-evolution debate understand this story and the earlier one (10/14/2004), because they cut to the heart of Darwinist claims that mutations and natural selection can create brains out of atoms given millions of years.  This is where the rubber meets the road: can mutations and recombination under selection act in concert to produce evolutionary progress, including wings and eyes and sonar and powered flight?  Complex systems need an explanation at the genetic level.  The modern synthesis of evolutionary theory (neo-Darwinism) maintains that mutations are the source of evolutionary novelty, and that natural selection preserves the rare beneficial mutations in a cumulative way.  This is the machine room from which “endless forms most beautiful” (06/29/2005) emerge without a Designer.  Two scientific papers reported here, that would likely be little noticed otherwise, have essentially falsified neo-Darwinism in the lab.  Theory and experiment both show it does not work.    In the previous entry (10/14/2004) we likened the situation to a victim held up by robbers but protected by guardian angels.  The bad news was that the robbers either shoot each other or shoot the victim simultaneously, and the guardian angels fight each other instead of helping the victim.  It’s like a Murphy’s “Non-Reciprocal Laws of Expectations” that state, (1) Positive expectations produce negative results, and (2) Negative expectations produce negative results.  The neo-Darwinists have put all their hope in positive expectations, but real-world experiments show that mutations do not and cannot add up for good.  They conspire for bad!  Only the built-in safety mechanisms in the cell hold off mutational catastrophe.  This same lesson should have been learned from the important 03/17/2003 entry almost four years ago; presumed benefits actually cause “slippage on the treadmill” to keep the organism, at best, just running in place.    Another analogy may illuminate what this new outwardly dry, boring, technical paper said.  Picture a large, well-run factory with numerous modern systems for safety, backup and security.  Along comes a motley gang with no plan other than to wreak havoc at random.  Some are blocked by the entrance controls.  Those that get inside start overturning tables, knocking out factory workers, setting off alarms and creating general mayhem.  The security systems each come into play as planned, trying to isolate the damage, restore backups, and start the redundant processes.  Workers scramble to copy off the important data to other sections of the factory where the work can continue.  Security guards manage to neutralize some of the attackers, but more keep coming in.  Some gangsters plug the real workers then steal their lab coats and badges, wandering around to do their harm by stealth.  To an outsider, it may not be apparent that anything is wrong – for awhile – because the factory continues to function; supplies come in, goods go out.  In time, however, the best-prepared factory may not be able to carry on.  Fires are set at random.  Automatic sprinklers respond as designed, but now they have damaged the computers.  Gangsters pull fire alarms here and there, confusing workers who don’t know whether to ignore them or run outside.  Security forces are eventually overwhelmed.  Backup systems are damaged as soon as they are brought online.  It’s too much; the factory implodes in a catastrophe, and everything shuts down.    If this is really the way mutations work in a cell, it should be obvious to everyone that trusting any random mechanism to produce order is a vain hope and supreme folly.  This, of course, is what anti-Darwinists have been maintaining since 1859.  That it would take two research teams with no ties to creationist organizations or the intelligent design movement, published in two of the most adamantly anticreationist scientific journals in the world (PNAS and Nature) to finally figure this out should be of great interest to historians and sociologists.  What is it about Darwinian faith that generates negative epistasis against common sense?    Evolutionary theory is coasting downhill on a dead-end track with no fuel in the engine, while the passengers are being served cheese and wine, not knowing anything is wrong.  Creation-Evolution Headlines is like the tattler running down the aisles warning everybody about bad news only the engine crew is aware of, despite the pleasant announcements on the intercom.  We think the customers who paid for the trip deserve to be told the truth: despite how smoothly things appear to be running, they just got sold a dead-end trip to destruction.(Visited 73 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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CSIR at the World Water Forum

first_imgThe Orange River is one of South Africa’smajor water sources. (Image: GraemeWilliams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com.For more photos, visit the image library.)Janine ErasmusThe Council for Scientific and Industrial Research will feature prominently at the World Water Forum in Istanbul this month, with a number of the organisation’s groundbreaking research projects going on show. Top South African water scientists will also take part in discussions and presentations.CSIR group executive Khungeka Njobe is excited about the organisation’s participation in the fifth edition of the World Water Forum (WWF5), particularly as South Africa is on the shortlist to host the next event.“South Africa is competing against France and Canada to host WWF6 in 2012,” she said. “We will be using this opportunity to share with the global water community our progressive legislative and policy framework and world-class research. The Department of Water Affairs is leading the bid process, but the CSIR has a critical role to play in demonstrating the country’s leadership in water research.”The host for 2012 will be announced during the forthcoming session. Should South Africa be awarded the sixth World Water Forum, it will be a major coup for the southern hemisphere, which has never had the chance to host the event. The country’s bid is centred on Durban, which has the infrastructure and facilities to host an event of this magnitude.The 2012 World Water Forum in South Africa will mean that water problems relevant to sub-Saharan Africa will come under the global spotlight, and that the Southern African Development Community region will be placed on the global water map. The event will give Africa the chance to become a valued contributor to the water-related issues of the world, rather than merely a recipient of donor aid and professional advice.Top-level representationCSIR projects on display at the Forum include acid mine drainage methodologies, human health projects, rural service delivery, and programmes focusing on water for growth and development. Many of these projects fall under the CSIR Built Environment and CSIR Natural Resources and the Environment sectors.CSIR representatives at WWF5 include engineer Dr Kevin Wall, CSIR water resources manager Marius Claassen and researcher Renias Dube. Wall is also scheduled to present a paper on South Africa’s strategy for water services asset management, and the three scientists will assist Minister of Water Affairs and Forestry Lindiwe Hendricks during the week-long event. Hendricks will host a round table involving her ministerial counterparts from around the world.The Department of Water Affairs and Forestry’s Water for Growth and Development programme, one of the projects on show in Istanbul, is in the running for the King Hassan II Great World Water Prize, one of three prestigious water-related awards up for grabs.The other two awards are the Turkish Republic Prime Minister’s Water Prize, and the Kyoto World Water Grand Prize.The King Hassan prize, worth R1-million (US$100 000), is for individuals or organisations that have made outstanding contributions in various aspects of water resources, whether scientific, economic, technical, environmental, social, institutional, cultural or political.The Kyoto prize is worth R280 000 ($28 000) and acknowledges grassroots-level activities that work towards addressing critical water needs of communities and regions. The Turkish Republic Prime Minister’s Water Prize is for journalistic excellence in the coverage of water issues. A prize of R264 000 (€20 000) each will be awarded to two journalists.Global collaboration on water problemsAccording to the World Water Council, 1.1-billion people around the world live without clean drinking water, and 2.6-billion people lack adequate sanitation. Poor access to safe water increases child mortality by up to 20 times, and in areas not served by usable water 3 900 children die every day from water-borne diseases.The World Water Forum is the largest water-related event in the world and aims to facilitate global collaboration on these critical water problems. The forum is organised by the World Water Council and takes place every three years, providing an ideal platform for policy-makers from all over the world to press for greater political commitment to and higher priority for water management strategies.The 2009 forum takes place in March in Istanbul, Turkey, after successful events in Mexico (2006), Kyoto (2003), The Hague (2000), and Marrakech (1997). This year’s theme is “Bridging Divides for Water” and is a reference to the location – Istanbul stands at the cross-roads of Europe, Asia, Middle-East and Africa – as well as the intent of providing a bridge between the developed and developing worlds.There are a number of side events associated with the main forum, among them the World Water Forum Expo and Water Fair, the Global Water Education Village, and the Youth World Water Forum.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Contact Janine Erasmus at [email protected] linksWorld Water ForumWorld Water Forum – Facebook pageWorld Water CouncilDepartment of Water Affairs and ForestryWater for Growth and Development (pdf)last_img read more

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A billion dollars to invest in Africa

first_img19 June 2015Afro pessimists step aside, because the big leagues are bringing their green bucks to Africa.That’s the message from TPG Growth and Satya Capital, which announced a billion- dollar investment partnership in Africa on 18 June.The partnership is TPG’s first African-focused investment vehicle. It will invest in growth stage companies and the next generation of entrepreneurs across the continent.Satya managing partner Moez Daya said the partners were looking for entrepreneurial partnerships “north of the Limpopo River” and which could benefit South African businesses.“The growth of the consumer face middle class is greater in sub-Saharan Africa,” he said. “South African growth is a lot more constrained. Growth beyond South Africa is faster, but more risky.“The business we do is partnering great companies, those who are breaking through the [Limpopo] border. We will be the ideal partners for South African companies wanting to do that. We bring capital, tools, know-how and the relationships that we’ve built across Africa.”Big investmentSatya Capital was started by Sudanese-British billionaire Mo Ibrahim, who sold his African-based mobile communication company Celtel for $3.4-billion (about R42- billion) in 2005.TPG, the global private investment firm, has $74-billion of assets under its management, while TPG Growth, its middle market and growth equity investment platform, has $7-billion. The latter’s current and past investments represent a mix of disruptive and innovative companies across tech, retail and entertainment including Uber, Airbnb, Box, Domo, Beautycounter, Ride, Angie’s Artisan Treats, Fender, SurveyMonkey, Evolution Media and STX Entertainment, among others.The partnership is TPG’s first African-focused investment vehicle. It will invest in growth stage companies and the next generation of entrepreneurs across the continent.The partnership with Satya Capital, an independent investment firm focused on Africa, brought deep regional expertise, relationships and on-the-ground experience, said Daya.Growth focusThe money will be provided by TPG Growth, which will look for companies and entrepreneurs in all sectors that are in need of capital to help them grow, including in health care, technology, media and telecommunications, consumer and financial services.While Satya normally targeted investments of between $20-million and $150- million, this partnership would allow it to broaden the scope to between $1-million and $200-million, said Daya.“It is exciting for African entrepreneurs looking for investors,” he said. “TPG is willing to invest up to $1-billion in Africa provided it is the right company. They are not bound by geography, but go where the opportunity is. However, this partnership allows them to focus more on the growth in Africa.”Daya, the former chief executive of Celtel International, said that business was a “landmark opportunity and company” for Satya Capital. “We’ve [Satya] been operating for seven years in Africa and built a portfolio of companies.”Satya Capital, which has capitalised $300-million in Africa, focused on an evergreen model. “That means we keep recycling the money within a company instead of withdrawing our investment,” he explained. “We invest in companies without a strict limit on when to leave, which gives businesses the ability to realise their full potential and brings stability,” he said, adding that the partnership with TPG was not part of his group’s evergreen strategy.Africa riskDaya said the risk of doing business in Africa had micro and macro elements.“There is a risk who you do business with and who you partner with, which is something we factor in,” he said.“South Africans are used to working in private equity, but that is not the case in sub-Saharan Africa. A lot of businesses are used to the old way of doing business, but they need to start looking to the new way. It’s a challenge for them and that’s the execution risk.“Then there is the risk of economy and infrastructure and political risk that goes with doing business in sub-Saharan Africa,” he said. “You also have depreciation issues, but the underlying growth exceeds most of those risks.”Source: News24Wirelast_img read more

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10 months agoShearer tells Man Utd fans: Your club’s still a mess

first_imgShearer tells Man Utd fans: Your club’s still a messby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer England captain Alan Shearer says Manchester United fans shouldn’t get carried away with victory at Cardiff City.Shearer wrote for The Sun: “The club is still a mess and one good performance doesn’t change that.”Five goals for the first time since Sir Alex Ferguson retired is obviously a positive — but you can’t get too excited about them beating a newly-promoted team who are battling relegation.”And let’s be clear, it’s no coincidence that the board at United sacked Jose Mourinho with a favourable run of fixtures on the horizon.”The timing is no shock as they would have wanted to give Ole Gunnar Solskjaer the best possible chance of getting off to a good start.”Cardiff, Huddersfield, Bournemouth and Newcastle is a great run for a new manager — it would have been very different if they had the likes of Chelsea or Tottenham coming up.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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VShips Offshore Takes FSO under Management

first_imgzoom V.Ships Offshore, a ship management arm of V.Group, has been awarded a contract to provide operations and full technical management of the floating storage and offloading (FSO) vessel Pertamina Abherka in Indonesia.As informed, this is the second vessel owned by Jakarta-based shipping company Pertamina International Shipping to be managed by V.Ships Offshore.The 101,777 cbm FSO, currently operating at Poleng Marine Terminal, offshore west of Madura Island, also acts as an accommodation facility with a potential capacity of 250 including 21 crew members.The vessel will be managed by the V.Ships Offshore office in Singapore with a local support team based in Indonesia.“Our teams from V.Ships Offshore and Pertamina International Shipping have worked hard to ensure a safe and smooth transition as the vessel came into management. We look forward to continuing our relationship with the team in support of the Indonesian marine and offshore sector,” Sanford D’Souza, general manager, V.Ships Offshore Asia, said.V.Ships Offshore offers offshore services in the marine market. This includes platform supply vessels, dive support vessels, pipe layers, DP shuttle tankers, floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) units, drillships, subsea construction vessels and offshore accommodation vessels and barges.last_img read more

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Softball Ohio State downs Wright State 141 in home opener

OSU softball players during a game against Penn State on April 6 at Buckeye Field. Credit: Lantern File PhotoThe No. 25 Ohio State softball team (19-7) played in Columbus on Wednesday for the first time this season after a 25-game road stretch and gave the home fans something to cheer about, downing Wright State 14-1 in five innings.“Words can’t explain how excited I was since I woke up this morning, knowing today was the home opener,” said sophomore first baseman Alex Vargas.Wright State took a quick 1-0 lead in the first after a wild pitch from OSU junior pitcher Morgan Ray scored Macey Gunther, but it was all Buckeyes from that point, thanks to a huge first inning highlighted by a grand slam from senior right fielder Alex Bayne.“We were ready to perform for (our fans),” Vargas said. “For us to keep our composure — especially on a big day like this — and perform, hit and score run after run after run, I think that just shows that we care to do well for our fans.”The Buckeyes scored nine runs on five hits in the first, forcing two pitching changes in the inning. Sophomore second baseman Emily Clark hit a two-RBI double while senior third baseman Anna Kirk, sophomore shortstop Lilli Piper and junior first baseman Ashley Goodman each had an RBI, giving OSU a 9-1 lead.“We were spraying the ball around the field, so it wasn’t like we were doing one thing,” said OSU coach Kelly Kovach Schoenly. “Emily Clark hitting the ball down the corner (to right field) and then (Alex) Bayne hitting a ball down left field — it’s just nice to see them hitting the ball where it’s pitched not trying to do too much and everyone chipping in.”The Buckeye lead grew in the third as OSU pushed across five insurance runs. Piper hit a two-RBI single while Clark hit a three-run home run to left center field to extend OSU’s lead to 14-1 after three innings.The big lead allowed the Buckeyes to empty their bench a bit in the later innings. OSU made six substitutions in the field, allowing some bench players to participate in the home opener, which meant just as much to the starters as it did the substitutes, Kovach Schoenly said.“The starters work side by side on the field with them in practice every day so they know how hard they work and it means a lot to them to see their teammates have success,” she said. “I don’t think there’s one starter that wouldn’t hand their bat over to give someone else a chance to be a part of it.”The Buckeyes return to Big Ten action on Friday when they begin a three-game home series with Rutgers (8-21) as they look to improve upon their 3-0 conference record. read more

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Allegri believes Juve can snatch Scudetto

first_imgJuventus coach Massimiliano Allegri is pretty confident that his team’s stunning late win against Inter Milan could be a decisive one in the race for the Scudetto, where Napoli are their main competitor.Juve looked almost set for back-to-back league defeats but then it was Juan Cuadrado in the 87th minute and Gonzalo Higuain two minutes later that scored and thus helped Juve move three points forward and four points clear of Napoli.“It was a wonderful evening of football between two teams who needed to win and went all out,” Allegri told SkySports.“We were aggressive and played well throughout the first half, but we fell asleep in the locker room and ended up trailing.”Franck Ribery, FiorentinaFiorentina owner: “Ribery played better than Ronaldo!” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Fiorentina owner Rocco Commisso was left gushing over Franck Ribery’s performance against Juventus, which he rates above that of even Cristiano Ronaldo’s.“Inter played well, but got tired in the end, crumbled physically and we took advantage. It’s another step towards the Scudetto, even if it remains very difficult.”“Nothing is ever certain in football. I knew it would be tough and in the final four rounds there is always more pressure than when you play in September.”“Even a side with great mental strength will have moments where they lose confidence. Fortunately, the lads have found it again and we turned it around.”“It’ll make a big difference in the Scudetto race. It is very difficult to win at San Siro and the lads put in an extraordinary performance. We know that we’ve got to win them all,” Allegri went on to add.last_img read more

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