SAN DIEGO: Church center houses music program for homeless youth

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments (1) An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis By Hannah WilderPosted May 24, 2013 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Amber, one of the participants in the Taking Music to the Streets program at the Episcopal Church Center in Ocean Beach, California, strums a guitar during a lesson with volunteer teacher Packy Bergquist. The program offers free weekly music lessons to homeless youth. Once a youth returns three times to the program, he or she receives a free instrument. As trust builds, volunteers assist the youth with safe living situations, education, job training and general life skills. Photo/Jeffrey Sitcov[Diocese of San Diego] “I like all kinds of music,” said Kayla, a slight young woman with a panda bear hat and an air of sweetness and innocence. “There’s this song by Jason Aldean called ‘Don’t Give Up on Me’ that talks about love. I love that song! It makes me want to play guitar.”Kayla is one of 75 homeless youth who have walked through the gates of the Episcopal Church Center in Ocean Beach and received a free music lesson and a hot meal. Through a partnership with Photocharity, a nonprofit that raises awareness about homeless and disadvantaged youth, the center welcomes people ages 12 to 24 to learn an instrument and feel at home for a few hours every Sunday afternoon.This particular Sunday, a soft rain was falling, but the doors stood wide open as young people trickled in. Jeffrey Sitcov, founder and executive director of Photocharity, buzzed around the parish hall, welcoming people. He moved quickly, carrying a stack of T-shirts and six guitars. He talked to donors and checked kids in all at once. When he saw a familiar face, he gave a hug and said, “Welcome! Good to see ya, bro!” He looked each person full in the face, locked eyes and said, “Welcome!”Three volunteer teachers showed up and started tuning instruments. Warm sounds of acoustic guitar filled the parish hall as someone played an Eric Clapton-like riff.Kids sauntered in, some on skateboards. One, probably 8 years old, arrived with his mom, eager to learn the harmonica.“We just came in to see what’s up,” said another when Sitcov asked what brought him and his friends through the doors. Everyone is greeted with a handshake and a proper introduction; each person is met with dignity. A donor has brought home-made chocolate chip cookies, which no one turns down.Within 20 minutes the parish hall transformed into a lively music lab with different groups focusing on guitar, drums, piano, harmonica, bass and ukulele. The drummers sat outside, sheltered by the balcony overhang. Once lessons got underway, the guitar players headed for the sanctuary because the parish hall grew too noisy.A volunteer teacher sat with a young woman and asked, “Do you like the blues?”“I don’t know,” she replied. “What does it sound like?”He played a classic blues progression on the acoustic guitar. She wasn’t sure she liked it, so he played reggae. Her face lit up, and they set to work.When participants return for the third time, they receive a free musical instrument of their choice.Building trustThe Taking Music to the Streets program aims to improve the self-esteem of these young people, to show them that people care about them and to create trust, which eventually leads the kids into shelters and programs that help them break the cycle of homelessness.“We give them something good for the heart and soul and that helps them pay for their meals,” said Sitcov. “Then when they’re feeling good and they trust us, we help them get into programs that get them off the streets.”The program began March 10 at the church center.“Without this program, there is no way I would have an opportunity to learn how to play and get an instrument,” said Casey, one of the participants. “Thank you.”“I’ve wanted to get my own guitar for over six years,” said Amber, another participant. “I am excited about earning my guitar!”These homeless youth have heartbreaking stories. One was kicked out at age 14 because of her sexual orientation. Her mother was addicted to prescription pills and would badger her daughter for them. She wanted a better life for herself so she left home.Another young woman has been homeless since she was 12. She likes the music program because she feels respected. She looks forward to getting off the streets.In the program’s first 10 weeks, 75 youth attended classes. Twelve returned three times or more. Ninety-five percent of these youth are 18 to 24 years old and none have many marketable skills. In the city of San Diego, there are 25 beds and a one-year waiting list for homeless kids in this age bracket.Sitcov, the founder of Photocharity, expressed thanks to the Episcopal Church for allowing Photocharity to have classes for “the throwaway homeless youth that no one is helping.”“You are keeping hope alive for these young people. This is the beginning of breaking the cycle of youth homelessness,” said Sitcov.The partnership between Photocharity and the Episcopal Church Center began through an unlikely acquaintance. Susan Rackley attends church at the center, but not for the Episcopal liturgy. She is a member of The Oasis Christian Fellowship, a nondenominational church that meets in the parish hall. When she learned about Photocharity’s need for space to teach music to homeless kids, she reached out to the owner of the property, the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego, who reviewed the proposal and said yes.“Homeless people know this place well,” Rackley said. “They have dinners here on Wednesday nights and receive food from the pantry on other days. This place has been so instrumental in the success of the music program. They’ve been open, flexible. You think of Episcopalians as a little uptight, but not this place!”History of serviceThe center in Ocean Beach has a long history of offering peace and sanctuary to all regardless of creed. It was founded in 1922 as Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, which it remained until 2006, when its rector led the congregation out of the Episcopal Church. After a legal dispute, the property was returned to the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego in 2011.Ministries to homeless people, which began more than 20 years ago, continued uninterrupted through the change of leadership thanks in large part to Nancy Holland, canon for mission enterprise and director of the Episcopal Church Center.“I’m so proud of Nancy and grateful for her leadership and presence,” said Diocese of San Diego Bishop James R. Mathes. “She has been a remarkable ambassador for the church in Ocean Beach, taking up residence on the city’s crime-prevention task force while bolstering existing programs at the center and making room for new ones. She has turned this church into a life center for the community, and she’s done it with patience, grace and a lot of quiet listening. We are gifted by her business acumen and her strategic thinking.”Opportunities to partner with others in the community is a key to success, said Holland. “It’s the only way we’re going to end homelessness in San Diego.” Currently there are more than 3,000 youth, ages 12 to 17, who are homeless in San Diego, she said.Photocharity’s Sitcov is a professional photographer who rubs shoulders with celebrities such as B.B. King, Elton John, Billy Joel and Bruce Springsteen. He procures their autographs on musical instruments and memorabilia, which he then sells or auctions. All proceeds support the mission and vision of Photocharity, which is dedicated to raising awareness and funds for charitable organizations that empower homeless and disadvantaged youth to make better choices.“Nancy’s a joy to work with!” exclaimed Sitcov. “She trusted Photocharity and our vision. The facility is great – we love it. It’s a perfect place to have classes.”Rackley saw Photocharity featured on a local television station. Her father had just died, and she was looking to make a memorial gift in his honor. She researched Photocharity and found that it was a worthy nonprofit that devoted a high percentage of each dollar to helping kids on the streets.“Jeffrey’s amazing,” said Rackley. “He’s got the energy of an Energizer bunny, and he’s a heck of a fundraiser. He’s not afraid to ask for autographs from celebrities to raise money for this program. He has a big heart and is always looking for ways to reach homeless kids.”Said Casey, “This program gives me more stability every week, I have somewhere good to go no matter what, where I can play instruments, hang out with nice people and have dinner. I’m very thankful. It is a blessing.”— Hannah Wilder is communications director for the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID SAN DIEGO: Church center houses music program for homeless youth Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 May 24, 2013 at 4:58 pm Excellent article, Hannah! Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Youth & Young Adults Director of Music Morristown, NJ Liturgy & Music, Travis Thomas says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Poverty & Hunger, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

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The Entertainer partners with Christian Aid to support Bangladesh families

first_img About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.  88 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1  87 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 The Entertainer partners with Christian Aid to support Bangladesh familiescenter_img Melanie May | 11 May 2016 | News Toy retailer The Entertainer is partnering with Christian Aid for Christian Aid Week this year.This year’s event runs from 15th – 21st May and will focus on helping families in Bangladesh. The Entertainer will be raising money to provide worms and seeds that will enable them to grow food from their river-island homes that are often devastated by floods.The Entertainer is the official Key Communications Partner for the week, with a number of activities taking place and involving each of the 123 The Entertainer stores. These will include handing out Christian Aid Week activity sheets to educate children about the cause, placing collection boxes in store as well as providing informative links and downloadable content, for customers interested in helping, online.The Entertainer will also be hosting a ‘Big Brekkie’ event at its headquarters in Amersham, Bucks, as well as encouraging local schools to take part in the fundraising by offering store vouchers for schools that raise over £100.Gary Grant, founder and managing director of The Entertainer, said:“Helping families in need around the world is part of our ethos at The Entertainer, and encouraging children across UK to get involved is very important. We are looking forward to lots of activities taking place throughout Christian Aid Week and hopefully raising a lot of money for a very worthwhile cause.”The Entertainer is also an active member of the Pennies scheme, which gives customers the option to donate a few pence to charity at the till-point, on average generating £5,000 of donations each week. Advertisement Tagged with: Christian Aid corporate Pennies Foundationlast_img read more

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Shut-out federal employees say: Stop the war on workers!

first_img“Stop the war on workers!” and “We want work, not walls!” read signs held by furloughed federal employees at the White House and in cities around the U.S. on Jan. 10. They were protesting the Trump administration’s shutdown of nine federal departments and several federal agencies — one-quarter of the federal government — since Dec. 22.National Treasury Employees Union members rally in Washington, D.C., Jan. 10.Some 800,000 government workers are not receiving paychecks. Half of them have been shut out of their jobs, while the other half have been forced to work without receiving paychecks — on threat of being fired. It is a severe hardship for many of those impacted by the longest shutdown in U.S. history, which could go on indefinitely.The reason for the aggressive attack on these workers: President Donald Trump, backed by top Republicans, is demanding that Congress fund a $5 billion wall at the southern U.S. border with Mexico to bar the entry of desperate Central American families fleeing government repression, violence and poverty, and looking for safe places to live and work. Many of the ills they are running from are caused by U.S. political interference and/or economic exploitation in their countries.Trump’s rants about the need to build this wall are xenophobic and white supremacist to the core. He and his political allies are holding federal workers hostage in their ploy to build the wall, blaming the migrants for the shutdown and deliberately ramping up anti-immigrant hostility to pursue their racist agenda. This is a familiar divisive tool used by the capitalist class and its political representatives.All progressive forces, particularly labor unions, must strongly oppose the administration’s bigoted rhetoric and show solidarity with these Central American refugees. They are workers, too. This is about class solidarity.Time for new tacticsThe American Federation of Government Employees, the largest federal government union, called out its members to demonstrate in Washington, D.C., and around the country on Jan. 10. Now is the time to “think outside the box,” to push back the intransigent right-wingers in the administration and their ruling-class backers. This will take creative and militant actions nationally and locally. The labor movement courageously occupied factories in the 1930s to win union recognition and worker benefits. Public workers were part of the sit-down wave. The historic Civil Rights Movement sat in at segregated public facilities to break the grip of racist Jim Crow laws in the South. It organized countless demonstrations, including a massive rally in August 1963 in D.C.The AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power organized militant actions in the 1980s calling attention to the AIDS crisis and demanding research and life-saving treatment. And last year, disabled activists occupied local congressional offices and Senate office buildings in D.C. to defend the Affordable Care Act. For many, it was a life-and-death struggle.There are new, progressive Democratic members of Congress, many women of color. Some of them, along with longtime congresspeople, are joining workers’ protests and speaking out on their behalf. A number are denouncing “Trump’s wall” and bigotry. It’s a big political party. Where are its leaders? They could call for a massive demonstration to circle the Capitol. Democratic members of Congress could take the floor and insist on an end to “business as usual” until the shutdown ends and all furloughed employees and contracted workers are paid lost wages.But this is a party of Big Business. The workers cannot rely on it for solutions.Shutdown’s impact on federal workersU.S. imperialism’s main instrument, the Pentagon, is not affected by the shutdown. It was fully funded earlier by a vote of both congressional parties.But many federal workers who perform vital social functions like inspecting food, taking care of national parks, administering public housing, curtailing pollution, preparing and serving food, and working as custodians in federal buildings are either furloughed or working without pay.This shutdown is harming the lowest-paid workers the most. Many are having difficulty paying for mortgages, rent, transportation, child care, medication, food and utilities. While they will receive lost pay retroactively, they need their income now! Many are taking part-time work, relying on family members and/or taking out loans with interest fees. Some are turning to food pantries, churches, and charities and/or setting up online fund appeals.The shutdown has exposed the reality that millions of workers, federal employees or not, lack the funds to get through a crisis. It has further exposed the financial inequities faced by African-American, Latinx and other workers of color.Women comprise the majority of the federal workforce, and 81 percent of women workers in the U.S. live paycheck to paycheck. Many are heads of households and sole supporters of their families. Cuts in essential government services are endangering them and their families’ health and well-being. Gender-oppressed people are among those harmed by this shutdown.Contracted Black and Latinx workersThe federal government also relies on contracted workers; 2.8 million of them perform service jobs, from health aides to computer programmers. Many are women. Some of them are affected by the shutdown. A vast pay gap exists among these and other federal workers. Those doing food service and facility maintenance, those who are administrative assistants and security guards all work long hours for little pay — many earning only the federal contractor minimum wage.Already among the lowest paid in the federal workforce, they will continue to feel financial pain for years to come. Unlike other federal employees, they are outrageously blocked from receiving pay lost due to the shutdown — even those who support families.Julie Karant, representing Service Employees Union Local 32BJ covering 2,000 federal contract workers in the D.C. area, says, “Our members are predominantly, if not exclusively, African-American and Latino. They don’t necessarily have health care or pension benefits and most of them have multiple jobs.” Loss of a paycheck means they have to choose among medications, food and electricity. (Think Progress, Jan. 12)This crisis is disproportionately hitting African Americans, who comprise 18 percent of federal workers. Because of the racial wealth gap in the U.S., more of these employees lack the emergency savings needed to get by without regular paychecks. In many Black families, several wage earners work for the federal government, due to private sector racist discrimination.Lora Williams, a 26-year employee of the National Parks Service, told the Jan. 11 Guardian that she lacks cash reserves and, even with online fundraising, is “barely staying above water.” This Black woman is concerned about NPS contractors who provide essential services like trash collecting but have not received back pay after past shutdowns.Shaneece Hill and her spouse, both contract workers for the Food and Drug Administration have gone through their emergency savings. They are not guaranteed retroactive pay. (Guardian, Jan. 12)Millions of women, seniors, refugeesThe shutdown has repercussions on the working class beyond the federal workforce, especially for women of color, people with disabilities and seniors.  Food and nutrition program (WIC) funding for 7 million women, infants and children has already stopped, reports the Jan. 10 Business Insider. Food stamps should continue through February.Domestic violence shelters countrywide cannot obtain federal funds they depend on. So they are curtailing crucial services for victims/survivors, including housing, transportation, medical care and food. Federal funds have been suspended for the Indian Health Service, which provides care to over 1 million Indigenous women.Five million people who receive federal housing subsidies could face eviction as Section 8 vouchers lapse. Women head 75 percent of households living in public housingThe Department of Housing and Urban Development abruptly stopped funding many assisted living facilities for low-income seniors, with no warning.Asylum hearings have been postponed for thousands of refugees. Central American adults, youth and children denied asylum continue to be held in inhumane U.S. detention facilities. Families are still separated.Moreover, national parks are deteriorating. Pollution and aviation safety inspections have ended. The FDA stopped checking food, despite widespread food-borne illnesses. Even small farmers are hurting, deprived of federal financing.End the shutdown! Reinstate all federal employees, contracted workers and programs! No racist wall!FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public”

first_img News News BelarusLithuaniaEurope – Central Asia Activities in the fieldCondemning abusesProtecting journalists ImprisonedFreedom of expressionExiled media June 8, 2021 Find out more June 7, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Four days after the Belarusian authorities hijacked a Ryanair flight and arrested the journalist Raman Pratasevich, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) organised a protest yesterday on the border between Lithuania and Belarus in support of the more than 20 journalists detained arbitrarily in Belarus. May 28, 2021 RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public” Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says News Receive email alerts Organisation to go further “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says News RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan Читать на русском / Read in RussianThe Belarusian, Lithuanian and French journalists participating in the demonstration brandished 20 photos of journalists held in Belarusian prisons in a tribute to the courageous battle waged by media personnel in Belarus.The protest was organised by Christophe Deloire, RSF’s secretary-general, Jeanne Cavelier, the head of its Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk, and Dionizas Litvaitis, RSF’s correspondent in Lithuania, with support from the Lithuanian Journalists’ Association.The photos included one of Raman Pratasevich, the journalist arrested by the Belarusian police after the Ryanair plane was forced to land in Minsk in violation of international law. RSF has filed a lawsuit in Lithuania accusing Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko of “hijacking an aircraft with criminal intent” – a lawsuit that has been incorporated into the criminal proceedings initiated by the Lithuanian authorities.“Behind this fence is Belarus, the country with a government that is locking up a generation of journalists who are little more than 20 years old,” Deloire said. “Journalists are not terrorists, although Alexander Lukashenko has used this term to refer to Raman Pratasevich. On the contrary, the terrorist is the person who puts journalists in prison and uses his crimes of violence to intimidate the public. And this is exactly what Alexander Lukashenko does.”Deloire added: “We have come to the border to protest against these arbitrary detentions and against the growing crackdown. We express our solidarity with all the journalists who are being persecuted, censored, jailed and tortured just for doing their work.”According to the tally kept by RSF and the Belarusian Association of Journalists (BAJ), its local partner, there have been more than 420 arrests of journalists in Belarus since the disputed presidential election in August 2020. Belarus has fallen five places in RSF’s 2021 World Press Freedom Index and is now ranked 158th out of 180 countries. Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia Help by sharing this information On May 27, twenty portraits of journalists locked up in Belarusian jails were brandished on the Lithuanian-Belarusian border by Belarusian, Lithuanian and French journalists. (credit: RSF) Related documents Читать на русском / Read in RussianPDF – 90.97 KB BelarusLithuaniaEurope – Central Asia Activities in the fieldCondemning abusesProtecting journalists ImprisonedFreedom of expressionExiled media June 4, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Sectarian violence in south declared off-limits for media

first_imgNews June 17, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Sectarian violence in south declared off-limits for media July 29, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information Organisation Receive email alerts Although the media have been asked not to report the truth about these and other events of late, coverage of the clashes in Aluthgama has been posted on websites that are blocked in Sri Lanka but are accessible outside the country.Journalists were harassed and attacked and their equipment was smashed when they went to cover the clashes, in which dozens of people were injured and several were killed. Those attacked included Sunday Leader reporter Binoy Suriarachi, who was held hostage of several hours. His release was negotiated by Megara Tegal and Dileesha Abeysundara, two journalists who had gone with him to cover the clashes.“Censorship of the media’s news coverage by the authorities is outrageous but customary in Sri Lanka whenever problems with minorities arise,” said Benjamin Ismaïl, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Asia-Pacific desk. “However, banning coverage of events will not prevent the information from getting out.”The clashes erupted after a gathering by Bodu Bala Sena (Buddhist Power Force), a radical Buddhist group that is waging a campaign against the Moslem community. Participants attacked mosques and prayer houses.The long tradition of government censorship includes banning and blocking the websites of many newspapers. On 12 May, the Sri Lanka Mirror’s website joined the long list of blocked sites, which already includes the Tamilnet, Lankanews, Lanka news web and the Colombo Telegraph sites.Sri Lanka is ranked 165th out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. January 13, 2021 Find out more The Sri Lankan authorities asked the local media not to cover the clashes between Buddhists and Moslems that erupted in the southern region of Aluthgama on the night of 15 June. A curfew was also imposed in an attempt to contain a situation described by the government as “tense.” to go further Sri Lanka: tamil reporter held on absurd terrorism charge News News Sri LankaAsia – Pacific Sri Lanka: RSF signs joint statement on attacks against human rights defenders, lawyers and journalists Follow the news on Sri Lanka News Sri LankaAsia – Pacific RSF_en Sri Lanka: Journalist manhandled by notorious police inspector currently on trial July 15, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Journalists tortured in DRC on provincial governor’s orders

first_imgThe level of press freedom violations and abuses against media workers continues to be alarming in the DRC and is the highest in sub-Saharan Africa. In June, RSF voiced alarm about Governor Crispin Ngbundu’s offensive against the media in the northwestern province of Mongala, where the provincial authorities fired or suspended journalists, suspended several political programmes until further notice, and closed privately-owned radio stations. News They were then taken to police headquarters in Lodja, where they were detained and tortured for several hours. Although badly injured, as RSF has confirmed from photos, they were taken the next day to the governor’s residence, where they were tied up and left in the sun all day while being ordered to admit they had been “manipulated” by their radio station’s owner. After they refused to admit to being manipulated, they were taken back to the police station for a second night of detention and were finally released on the evening of 22 August, when they were admitted to Lodja’s hospital with serious injuries. Radio Losanganya manager and editor François Lendo, who was also arrested during the original raid on the radio station on 20 August, had meanwhile been released after several hours without any explanation being given. Democratic Republic of CongoAfrica Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImprisonedImpunityViolence Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is appalled by shocking press freedom violations in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where a journalist and a radio technician were detained and tortured last week on the orders of a politically embattled provincial governor. The DRC’s authorities must do everything possible to protect media personnel from harassment by regional officials, RSF said. August 26, 2020 Journalists tortured in DRC on provincial governor’s orders Organisation Journalist Hubert Djoko and radio technician Albert Lokongo were arrested by members of the armed forces (FARDC) and national police during a raid on the headquarters of privately-owned Radio Losanganya in Lodja, a city in the central province of Sankuru, on 20 August. Djoko and Lokongo were initially taken to the stadium in Lodja where Sankuru governor Joseph Mukumadi, who was holding a meeting there, publicly threatened them and accused them of defending the political interests of their radio station’s owner, Lambert Mende Omalanga, a former information minister and long-standing political rival of the governor. On the same day as the original raid on Radio Losanganya, the soldiers and police also raided the local branch of the national state radio and TV broadcaster RTNC, which is located in the same building. The RTNC branch has been closed until further notice while Radio Losanganya has been ordered to broadcast nothing but music. Material and equipment were seized from both stations. When RSF and JED met jointly with President Félix Tshisekedi on the sidelines of the Paris Peace Forum on 12 November 2019, he expressed support for the idea of a moratorium on arrests of journalists in connection with their work pending an overhaul of the 1996 press law. RSF and JED also urged him to quickly establish a mechanism to protect and secure journalists, in which the first step would be to appoint a network of focal points in government agencies and ministries concerned with press freedom. Neither of these measures has so far been adopted. RSF_en Congolese reporter wounded by gunshot while covering protest in Goma February 24, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Democratic Republic of Congo News The DRC is ranked 150th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index. February 18, 2021 Find out more Journalist arrested on provincial governor’s orders Democratic Republic of CongoAfrica Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImprisonedImpunityViolence Related documents djokolokongo.pdfPDF – 314.09 KB Receive email alerts to go further According to Journalist in Danger (JED), an NGO that defends press freedom in the DRC and is RSF’s local partner, the governor accused both RTNC and Radio Losanganya of “broadcasting hate-filled programmes” and of “sabotaging” his actions “for political reasons.” Lendo, Radio Losanganya’s manager, says neither radio station received any official communication about the reasons for the raids or for the “barbaric” way Radio Losanganya’s two employees were treated while detained. RSF contacted the governor several times but he did not want to answer our questions. “There can be no justification for the physical mistreatment inflicted on the two Radio Losanganya employees or for the local media closure orders,” RSF deputy editor-in-chief Catherine Monnet said. “These unacceptable incidents must be the subject of a full and transparent investigation as soon as possible, and those responsible for these barbaric actions must be prosecuted and punished. At the same time, everything must be done to protect media workers from harassment by regional authorities.” Help by sharing this information News Anti-media offensive Reporter jailed in DRC for allegedly defaming parliamentarian News Albert Lokongo (left) and journalist Hubert Djoko (right) February 16, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Nouvelle traduction : Octavin Williams retenu depuis deux jours derrière les barreaux libérien

first_imgNews LiberiaAfrica Organisation RSF_en Reports RSF urges Liberian authorities to investigate threats against journalists News LiberiaAfrica December 16, 2020 Find out more to go further November 27, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts (photo slide-show : Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia) (photo logo : Octavin Williams) News Follow the news on Liberia The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa July 4, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Nouvelle traduction : Octavin Williams retenu depuis deux jours derrière les barreaux libérien index : http://rsf.org/index2014/en-index2014.php Covid-19 emergency laws spell disaster for press freedom Help by sharing this information June 12, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Media attacked by ministers and MPs for Iraq war coverage

first_img United KingdomEurope – Central Asia United KingdomEurope – Central Asia Safety of journalists remains active concern in Northern Ireland as BBC Panorama team is threatened Organisation Foreign secretary Jack Straw said on 1 April that the kind of media pressure surrounding the Iraq war would have made World War II more difficult to win. He told a meeting of the Newspaper Society it “might’ve been much harder to maintain the country’s morale after Dunkirk if live reports had confronted the public with the brutal reality of German technical and military superiority.” RSF_en March 23, 2021 Find out more February 12, 2021 Find out more February 11, 2021 Find out more RSF condemns BBC broadcast ban as example of Chinese government reprisal April 8, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Media attacked by ministers and MPs for Iraq war coverage to go further News News Reporters Without Borders called today on British government ministers and MPs to stop their sharp criticism of British media coverage of the Iraq war, saying it was unacceptable pressure to get the media to change its policies. It also accused them of trying to discredit the work of certain journalists.Tory MP Christopher Chope told the House of Commons on 3 April that the public-service broadcaster the British Broadcasting Corporation’s (which receives state funding for its World Service) reporting of Iraqi statements meant British taxpayers were being “forced to subsidise Saddam Hussein’s propaganda campaign.” He called on the BBC to withdraw its journalists from Baghdad.Labour MP Kevin Hughes also criticised the journalists and suggested they were cowards. Defence minister Geoff Hoon attacked the daily paper The Independent and its correspondent in Baghdad, Robert Fisk, and implied he had allowed himself to be fooled by the regime and had dubious sources.Home secretary David Blunkett said on 2 April that journalists reporting behind “enemy lines” and giving “blow by blow” accounts of what was happening there were treating the US and British forces and the Iraqi regime as “moral equivalents.” Journalists retorted that they had a right to inform the public and accused the government of trying to muzzle the press. Help by sharing this information Solidarity with Swedish media outlet Realtid ahead of UK defamation case hearing News News Receive email alerts Follow the news on United Kingdomlast_img read more

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Allstate NI says 40 jobs are on offer in Strabane

first_img40 full time permanent jobs are available in Strabane.I.T. company Allstate NI is holding a recruitment open day at their Strabane office on Thursday week from 4pm-7pm.The jobs available are all Technical Support Analyst positions.The Strabane office currently employs 450 people and is the town’s largest employer.Andrena Bradley is Senior Division Leader at Allstate NI……Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/allstatejobs.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Google+ Facebook Pinterest Homepage BannerNews By News Highland – September 15, 2015 Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry center_img Google+ 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Previous articleSenior Counsel appointed to investigate alleged planning irregularities in DonegalNext articleShiels wants planning review to accept public submissions News Highland WhatsApp 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Twitter Allstate NI says 40 jobs are on offer in Strabane Pinterest Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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