Work Experience

first_imgChris Beaney, owner of Beaney’s bakery based in Strood, Kent, is evangelical about offering work experience. He liaises closely with local schools to open his business to about three pupils a year for one and two-week placements. This has proved so successful that he has gone on to give about six of them jobs in both full-time and part-time roles.Beaney gets pupils involved in as many aspects of the business as he can, making sure he does not expose them to risk: they are not allowed to operate electrical machinery and unload ovens, for example. “By giving them work experience, we can find out if they are any good and report back to the school. Sometimes they come from broken homes and appreciate someone giving them a chance. It has been really positive.Beaney gets upset when he hears negative feedback from other bakers who will not give it a try. Indeed, the National Association of Master Bakers (NA) and Improve, the sector skills council for food and drink manufacturing and processing across the UK, estimate less than 5% of the industry offers 14- and 15-year-olds work placements. Many blame bureaucracy, local bylaws as well as health and safety and insurance issues for making it too onerous to get involved.While acknowledging the difficulties, NA chief executive David Smith wants the industry to get more involved – or at least help with recruitment problems. “It takes a lot of managing from the employers’ side and you have to have someone who can see the long-term benefit,” he says. “People tend to be too busy to go for it, which is part of the problem. I would advise people to look at it carefully.” Smith says students on work placements will be able to experience a sense of achievement from working in a bakery, adding that the working hours “aren’t as bad as the rest of the world thinks” and that it can be a pleasant, satisfying environment in which to work. Section 560 of the Education Act 1996, as amended by section 112 of the School Standards and Framework Act 1998, allows students in the last two years of compulsory education to participate in work experience where arrangements have been made by the Local Education Authority (LEA) – or school governing body on its behalf – as part of a child’s education. The government’s objective is for all Key Stage 4 pupils to receive two weeks’ quality work experience and, nowadays, more than 95% of pupils go on placements, although apparently not many in bakeries.Trident Trust, which works with 90,000 employers across the UK, placing 140,000 students, says many employers will offer work experience because they want to support the next generation of young people. Spokeswoman Nicky Godding says: “What better way to introduce your business to prospective employees early?”She says if employers have all the health and safety provisions in place for their staff, and have professional indemnity insurance, that should be enough to offer young people work experience.Mike Holling, marketing manager of Derby-based Birds the Confectioner, believes 21st-century Britain is overprotective of its school children. He rues what he sees as the barriers to accommodating requests for placements.Birds might not like the difficulties involved, but it nonetheless works through the red tape to take on about five children a year, where they request unpaid work experience, even though it is a voluntary arrangement and employers get no government funding for their participation. Holling regrets the industry is not as proactive as it could be in this area. “It gives the candidate real-life experience and they get the feel for this kind of work. For us, it is a way of getting people interested in the business,” he says.North-east independent craft bakery Peters Cathedral Bakery, which has 70 shops, has looked at the possibility of offering work experience in the past but MD Peter Knowles says that, while it looked good in theory, that is as far as it went. “We had so many hoops to jump through – health and safety issues, counselling sessions – that we did not progress to this [the practical] stage, which was a great shame.”David Smart, production director of Greenhalgh’s Craft Bakery, based in Bolton, Lancashire, took part two or three years ago, but is not currently involved because “finding suitable youngsters who wish to come into the bakery trade is like Mission Impossible IV”. Greenhalgh’s, which has 42 shops and supplies the major multiple supermarkets, used to run the Saturday Morning Baking Club where 15- to 16-year-olds would come into its bakery school for three hours and learn baking. “As a marketing exercise it was very good, but for recruiting youngsters it didn’t work, apart from one person,” Smart says.The Department of Education and Skills says the benefits for employers are that they:• get an opportunity to influence the curriculum;• can ensure new recruits come through with the right skills and attitudes;• find the company’s reputation is enhanced in the community;• are able to cut training costs;• see an improvement in the communication and management skills of the employees involved;• experience increased employee loyalty;• gain access to fresh ideas through the original thinking of young people.Christine Anderson, health and safety officer at Fine Lady Bakeries, which allows 14- and 15-year-olds on placements, says the problem is the machinery. “We don’t let them in the factory because they’ve got a habit of sticking their fingers where they’re not supposed to. It would be too much responsibility for whoever is controlling them.”Fine Lady Bakeries allows pupils to work in the product development kitchen, where three people are able to supervise them. Anderson says local schools are aware of the business because it is a major employer in Banbury. “Normally they ask children to find their own placements, but children don’t want to work in bakery. It’s quite hot. If they are next to the oven, you’re talking of temperatures of 20-30ºC. You could say they are on their summer holidays but it doesn’t work.”Meanwhile, Improve is working on the Manufacturing Diploma for 14- to 16-year-olds and the Young Apprenticeship Scheme – both learning programmes that it says will encourage the acceptance of children on work placements across the whole food and drink manufacturing industry, including bakery. SCHOOL LINK-UPWork with Schools, a project that aims to provide an opportunity for all to learn about the links between the worlds of work, school and college suggest the following plan of action for employers:• set up a strategy meeting with school managers;• agree mutual aims, objects and work experience content;• designate a time-table for work experience;• identify students;• devise a Service Level Agreement to include mutual expectations of students, parents, employers and school;• design relevant application forms;• assign relevant personnel and responsibilities, including staff who can assess the students’ progress and achievements;• inform students and parents and arrange an informative parents’ evening;• set targets for students, which can be regularly reviewed, and agree clear procedures for monitoring;• identify criteria for assessment, which go beyond mere attendance and punctuality and include the development of personal and social skills and an understanding of the relevant vocational skills.THE LAWLEAs and schools have a common-law duty to look after their children and they have responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Etc Act 1994 to take responsible steps to ensure placements arranged will be safe.Schools are required to check employers have suitable insurance in place. Should there be any accidents, employers must report this to the Health and Safety Executive or local authority under the Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995. The Education Act 1996 places certain limitations on the sort of work pupils can do.Section 3 of the Health and Safety at Work Etc Act 1974 gives LEAs, organisers and placement providers roles and responsibility for ensuring, as far as is reasonably practicable, the health and safety of students on work experience. The Health and Safety (Young Persons) Regulations (1997) require employers to undertake assessment of any risks before any students begin.last_img read more

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McDonald’s leads way

first_imgSkills council Improve hopes the wave of publicity surrounding the new McDonald’s qualification, which is equivalent to an A-level, will encourage more bakery employers to introduce nationally recognised in-house training. See 1 Feb British Bakerlast_img

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A very English affair

first_imgStepping into Fortnum & Mason (F&M) – a retailer whose price point is perhaps best summed up by the £5 pasty sitting in the deli section – you might be well advised to stroll past the exquisite patisserie (a concession of London’s Sketch), through the towering wedding cakes (made bespoke by cake master Peggy Porschen), and along to the £35 fruit cakes with your fingers in your ears, singing to yourself, “La la la la la la, what recession?”But wait! As a tourist draw of quintessentially English products, F&M benefits from the strong tourist euro and exports of hampers. And as a luxury retailer, Jonathan Millar, buyer of sweet grocery (including bakery, confectionery, biscuits, chocolates and jams), has the luxury of not being restricted on price. “I’d much rather look at something and think, ’Can I sell it?’” he says. “The price is obviously crucial, but I’m much more interested in whether something fits into F&M’s mix.”This, he believes, frees up his stable of niche bakery suppliers to be creative. “People who use really good ingredients are often more imaginative about how they use them because they’re conscious that they’re not necessarily making to a price.”On-site bakeryOn-site, F&M stalwart of 38 years Andrew Granger runs the scratch bakery, making a small number of traditional products, from Madeira cakes to lemon drizzle cakes, teacakes, apple pies, Chelsea buns, Eccles cakes and Bath buns. Bread is shipped in from north London’s The Bread Factory alongside brands like Poilâne, though Millar has slimmed down the bread SKUs. The majority of sweet bakery is bought in and although Millar has taken on many new suppliers, he has also been rationalising, as the store shifts more to own-label.He counts 20 main suppliers plus smaller ingredient and one-off niche suppliers on the books, all making bespoke for F&M. “I prefer to have a belt-and-braces approach,” he says, “with one supplier who will do most of the product and a number two in case anything happens. We have a lot of niche suppliers who do things quite narrowly, but they do them brilliantly.”The recipes are developed by Millar himself. “They’re either old recipes or recipes I’ve invented or worked on. The thing that’s crucial to F&M’s survival is that we do recipes that are specific to us. We don’t take just anything off the shelf and put our name to it,” he insists.One example he introduced for Christmas was a cracker-shaped pack with chocolate pearl shortbread on one end and macadamia nut shortbread on the other. He used chocolate pearls because he says “chocolate chips are everywhere”. The pearls are made by French confectioner Valrhona. “F&M is a very sweet store,” he says. “We sell vast quantities of biscuits, from shortbreads to English thins, Piccadilly biscuits and Florentines.”Smaller volumes are sold fresh from the bakery, though he turns over an “awful lot” of classics like scones, especially a 50% fruited scone and a cheese scone made with unpasteurised Montgomery Cheddar. “Because we’re a very English brand we like to look at regional recipes and see what we can do with them. Wherever possible I like to over-egg recipes, so we put things in that are rather lovely; I like complexity.”The store is a treasure trove for suppliers, who are encouraged to go on a super-upmarket sweep. For example, the shop’s range of single-origin chocolates and truffles pop up in all sorts of recipes. Champagne truffles will embellish bought-in round sponge cakes from Primrose Bakery in north London, as a decorative twist, and pink Champagne truffles top a pink iced cake. “It adds another dimension,” he explains. “I have an assistant and part of her life is spent ringing our suppliers and asking them, ’What do you need from the rest of the store?’.”There’s no scrimping on the ingredients. F&M is the biggest customer of vintage cognac supplier Delamain, for the cakes. “We get through around 6,000-7,000 bottles of that a year and it’s the very best cognac we can get. Interestingly, if you use things that are too old, when you bake them – as they are very aromatic – you actually have to put more in, because it’s all on the nose. If you’re using a crude spirit, such as a cheap whisky, you don’t have to put much in.”He also uses Somerset-based organic Jersey dairy Ivy House Farm for butter, cream and sometimes eggs in the bakery. “We support a lot of small specialist producers like Ivy House, and it makes for lovely, rich pastries.” Going forward, Millar is on the look-out for new, smaller categories, like steamed puddings and microwaveable puddings.And while there may be a recession going on, at least Kensington’s poodle population will be credit-crunching its way through some premium treats. He says: “At the moment we’re looking at dog biscuits, but with an F&M twist! You come to Fortnums to buy something incredible. We’re all about the unexpected.”—-=== Suppliers’ notes ===Jonathan Millar CV: Always been a food buyer, first at Harrods on fromagerie and frozen foods, and then on to F&M on deli, then grocery and sweet bakery.Dealing with suppliers: “One of the benefits of being F&M is suppliers are happy, if not desperate, to work for us! Very often it’s a telephone call, mulling over what’s possible and what we can do in the future with the ingredients and the packaging.”Hands-on approach: “Suppliers feed in their expertise and I feed in my ideas, along with my fellow buyers. Unlike elsewhere, as buyers, we have control over everything from recipes to manufacturing to packaging. I work out in my eye how it’s going to sell – every detail, from the size of the logo to the ribbon to the general feel of the range. I don’t like picking products off the shelf – I’d rather look at what suppliers are doing and add an F&M twist.”Minimum expectations from a new supplier: “We wouldn’t expect them to jump too many hurdles – we would help them bring their bakeries up to scratch etc. We really do work with very small suppliers – our shortbread supplier will bake to order. Expectations are simply that they are on our wavelength.”Pitching: “Just ring me on 020 7734 8040 or email me! I very rarely say no, as I’m naturally curious.”Biggest bugbear: “People coming to see me and not bothering to walk around to find out what F&M is about or thinking where their product would fit in. It’s a small bugbear that’s easily avoided with five minutes’ research.”Joys of the job: “I enjoy coming up with names and playing with the design. People are more likely to remember ’Arcadian Forest Cake’ over ’chocolate and cherry cake’. We are here to feed people but also to entertain.”last_img read more

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Mama’s proves it knows best

first_imgIt was a gruelling day of judging, resulting in a near-heart-stopping overdose of buttercream for our panel of experts. But the votes have been cast and we are delighted to announce Herts-based Mama’s Cupcakes the supreme champion of National Cupcake Week’s first ever Cupcake-off.Our top panel of judges, including esteemed bakery writer and consultant Dan Lepard, cake specialist and author Mich Turner and British Baker columnist and co-author of Leith’s Baking Bible Fiona Burrell, awarded it to Mama’s, who came up with a timely retro-kitsch creation – a Black Forest Gateau cake.Twelve shortlisted finalists were invited to bring their cakes along to be judged on appearance, texture, topping, taste and overall balance at sponsor Puratos’ new Innovations Centre in Fringford. Puratos’ technical expert Philip Bainbridge said: “All the 12 finalists have done really well. My favourite was the Black Forest Gateau – when you ate it all the flavours and textures went well together.”Co-sponsor Chevler’s sales director Mike Wescomb added: “There has been a lot of work and innovative ideas put into the cakes. But the one I liked most was the Black Forest, because it’s a grown-up cupcake.”The cupcake champion wins two tickets to this year’s Baking Industry Awards and all winners will receive a year’s supply of cupcake cases from Chevler and a copy of Mich Turner’s book, Fantastic Party Cakes. A special thanks goes out for the great response and high-quality entries. Everyone who didn’t make the shortlist should not be disappointed and we urge you to try again next year.National Cupcake Week is now calling on all bakers in all sectors to bake a different cupcake for each day of the week, Monday to Saturday (bakers put their feet up on a Sunday – in theory!). Use the winning recipe ideas as inspiration, or go crazy with your own creations.l Note: quantities appear as submitted by entrants—-=== Moreish Monday ===Winner: ’Eat Your Greens’ by Country Cupcakes; www.countrycupcakes.comCake: 2kg caster sugar * 4kg soft brown sugar * 2.4kg salted butter * 2.5ltrs sunflower oil * 60 free-range eggs * 2.6ltrs full-fat milk * 750g cocoa powder * 7kg plain flour * 130g baking powder * 9kg finely grated courgettes, peeled * 120ml Madagascan vanilla extractTopping: 1.3ltrs fresh double cream * 1.4kg good quality dark chocolate, chopped finely * pretty fondant decorationsMakes 120: Beat butter, oil and sugars together for 5 minutes until light and fluffy. While mixture is still beating, slowly add eggs. Add milk, mix until smooth * Sift flour, baking powder and cocoa into the mixture and fold in. Fold in courgettes and vanilla. Once well-mixed, pipe into cases to 2/3 full * Bake on 190?C for 20 minutes * For ganache topping, heat double cream to just before boiling point; take off the heat; pour in the chocolate, but don’t stir yet; leave to cool, then stir until all chunks have gone. Leave to firm up to a pipeable consistency * Take the cooled buns, using a large star nib, pipe the ganache on to the cupcakes * Finish off with a fondant decoration.Fiona (left): I thought this looked spectacular and the courgette was a good idea.Dan: It’s a really, really bright, simple idea.Mich: Because there’s a high proportion of topping, you could introduce different flavours with the chocolate. They’ve gone with the green flower, so you could do a mint chocolate or other flavoured chocolate with that.—-=== Tantalising Tuesday ===Winner: ’Summertime Fizz Cupcake’ by The Cupcake Girl; www.thecupcakegirl.co.ukCake: 2 large free range eggs * 125g caster sugar * 125g soft butter * 125g self-raising flour * 1tsp vanilla essenceTopping/filling: 200g chopped strawberries * Squeeze of lemon * 2tsp caster sugar * 100ml ChampagneMakes 10For the cake: cream butter and sugar, gradually add beaten eggs and vanilla * Sieve self-raising flour and gently fold into mix * half-fill cup cases * Bake for 15 minutes at 180?C until golden * To make strawberry & Champagne compôte: heat strawberries, lemon juice and sugar in a frying pan, add Champagne and reduce by half then leave to cool * Inject some compôte into the middle of each cupcake, then pipe on top and decorate with half a fresh strawberry.Fiona: The compôte in the middle was something different and it looked beautiful, nicely finished. But I think it could be even better with slightly less topping.Dan (left): Once a cupcake is finished, sometimes you think all that’s left is to decorate. What they’ve done here is scooped a bit out and put a compote inside. This is something you could do with plums, apricots or whizz up some tinned fruits in a blender and make up a really good compôte.—-=== Whipped-up Wednesday ===Winner: ’The White Rabbit’ by Fantasy Cupcakes; www.fantasycupcakes.co.ukCakes: 560ml Vegetable oil * 8 medium eggs * 800g soft brown sugar * 1.2kg finely grated carrot * 400g raisins * 300g roughly chopped walnuts * 720g self-raising flour * 2tsp bicarbonate of soda * ¼tsp of salt * 4tsp cinnamon * 2tsp nutmeg * 2tsp mixed spiceTopping: 500g unsalted butter (room temp) * 1kg icing sugar * Approx 100ml milk * 1 generous tbsp Nielsen-Massey Vanilla ExtractMakes 64: Beat together oil, eggs, sugar, carrot, raisins, and nuts * Sift in dry ingredients and fold setting until just combined * Fill muffin cases to ¾ * Bake for about 30 minutes at 170?C * For topping, beat butter until soft * Add half the icing sugar a bit at a time until well-mixed * Add half the milk and the vanilla extract and mix in rest of icing sugar * Add the remaining milk until the desired consistency of buttercream is achieved * Beat for a further three minutes * Pipe generously onto cakes with a plain nozzle * Decorate with hand-cut sugar hearts painted with edible gold lustre.Fiona: I like the carrot cake, which was quite moist, less so the appearance.Dan: They’ve taken a gorgeous carrot cake and turned it into a cupcake, which is great. Make ’favourite cake’ cupcakes. Find out what favourites your customers have and make that into a cupcake.Mich: It would be lovely to introduce some of the fresh zested flavours, like a fresh orange zest, into the buttercream so you’ve got a real blend, and counter that with a nice syrup underneath so you have a zesty flavour through it.—-=== Thrilling Thursday ===Winner: ’Crazy Lemon Drizzle Cupcake’ by Crazy Baker; www.crazybaker.co.ukCake: 125g unsalted butter * 175g caster sugar * Zest of 2 lemons * 2 eggs * 175g self-raising flour * 2 to 3tbsp milkTopping pt.1: Juice of 2 lemons * 3tbsp icing sugarTopping pt.2: 250g butter * Juice and zest of 2 lemons * 300g icing sugar * Gold decorationsMakes 12: Cream butter and sugar until white and fluffy, beat in eggs one at a time * Fold in flour with milk very gently * Fill cases ¾ full * Bake at 180?C for 8 to 10 minutes * Mix lemon juice and icing sugar together and drizzle over cakes; allow to cool * Mix the butter, icing sugar, zest and juice of lemons to make icing and pipe over cool cakes or spread using a knife * Apply decorationsFiona: The appearance was not so great, but the flavour of the lemon syrup on top gave a good flavour all through it. It was absolutely lovely. The only mistake is that they didn’t think hard enough about how they appeared and the wow factor – you need to get the balance between that and going over the top.Dan: Sometimes, bakers get scared about using fresh ingredients; using things like lemon zest can zip up a very simple cake. Also, using a syrup over the top of the cake is something that bakers can take from this.Mich: As Dan said, when working commercially, people tend to use ready-zested lemons, but if you zest them fresh, you can’t beat it. That’s what will encourage people to come back and buy this one again and again.—-=== Fulfilling Friday ===Winner: ’Very Vanilla’ by Pat-a-cupcake; www.patacupcake.co.ukCake: 440g self-raising flour, sifted * 440g caster sugar, sifted * 440g unsalted butter * 4tsp baking powder * 8 large free-range eggs * 4tsp Nielsen-Massey Vanilla extractTopping: 600g icing sugar sifted * 500g unsalted butter * 15ml Nielsen-Massey Vanilla extract * 100g melted Green & Black’s white organic chocolateMakes 40: Mix all cake ingredients until light and fluffy * Fill large cupcake cases with heaped tablespoons of the mixture and bake for 20 minutes at 160?C * For icing, place mix sifted icing sugar, butter and vanilla extract really well until light in colour; fully melt the chocolate and to the buttercream icing mixture and mix well.Fiona: This had really nice colours, with a very sophisticated look.Dan: It’s lovely when you pair the experience with the name – it’s called Very Vanilla and that’s exactly what it is. I also like the delicate, pale colours.Mich (left): What I loved about this was that it used really good, Fairtrade, organic Green & Black’s white chocolate. You can see the vanilla pods have been used and the flavours were very pure.—-=== Supreme Saturday ===Winner: ’Black Forest Cupcake’ by Mama’s Cupcakes; www.mamas-cupcakes.co.ukCake: 100g dark chocolate * 150g butter * 150g caster sugar * 3 eggs * 150g self-raising flour (mixed with 1 tbsp cocoa) * 2 tbsp ground almonds * 50g glacé cherriesTopping pt.1: 75g butter * 150g icing sugar * 2tbsp cocoa * 1tbsp kirsch * 50g dark chocolate (melted)Topping pt.2: 12tsp kirsch * Black cherry preserve * Half pint double cream * 12 liqueur cherries * Chocolate shavings * Optional edible glitterMakes 12: Melt chocolate * Beat sugar and butter until pale and fluffy * Add eggs one at a time, beating well * Beat in melted chocolate and stir in ground almonds * Sift flour and cocoa and fold in the glacé cherries * Spoon into large cases and bake for 20 mins at 180C * To decorate, spoon over a tsp of kirsch on each cupcake * Beat the butter, icing sugar, 1 tbsp kirsch and cocoa until well combined and soft * Fold in melted chocolate * Pipe an outer circle on each cupcake * Fill the centre of the circle with black cherry preserve * Whip double cream until stiff * Pipe a swirl on each cake, covering and sealing in the jam * Top with a liqueur cherry and chocolate shavings and edible glitterFiona: This was chosen because of the look of it. You cut it open and there is a surprise, with very moist cherries.Dan: One good thing about this is you can make it as expensively or cheaply as you like. You could fill it with Valrhona or use brandied cherries on top or use Cadbury’s and a budget cherry and still get a lot of fun out of it.Fiona: I agree. When you cut into it you’ve got that Morello cherry inside, which is a really lovely, lush, rich cherry. The only thing I would change would be to substitute the red glâcé cherry for a nice Morello cherry with a stalk.last_img read more

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Sustainable palm oil drive

first_imgNortech Foods has joined up with New Britain Oils Limited (NBOL) to offer fully certified sustainable palm oil in a packaged format to food manufacturers.NBOL, via its parent company New Britain Palm Oil Limited, has plantations in Papua New Guinea, which are certified as sustainable by the international Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil. NBOL will provide Nortech with palm oil from its UK refinery in Liverpool, which will be fully commissioned this spring. The processing facility will offer all the main palm oil grades in a sustainable format at a price that is comparable with oil from unknown/unsustainable sources.The partnership will help to overcome the primary challenges facing the wholesale conversion to sustainable palm oil among the UK manufacturing and food-service industry, namely affordability and traceability.Andy Worrall, director at NBOL, said: “Our research tells us that over 80% of consumers want food manufacturers and retailers to know where their palm oil has come from and that it was produced in a sustainable way.”last_img read more

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M&S takes half measures for new loaf

first_imgMarks & Spencer has launched a ’Half & Half Super Soft Loaf’, which contains both sliced white and wholemeal bread.Chris Seaby, product developer for bakery at M&S, told British Baker that the development of the loaf had come about following customer research, which revealed that they were buying white bread predominantly for their children, who weren’t keen on bits, while they preferred seeded and wholegrain loaves.”They were either compromising by just buying a white loaf, or buying one of each which led to issues around food wastage,” said Seaby, who revealed the launch of the new 800g loaf had got off to a fantastic start, with M&S “blown-away” by the sales.Seaby added that M&S was not aware of any other firms offering this type of loaf. He said the design of the packaging, which opens at both ends, and the combination of two different loaves was unique.last_img read more

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Next issue October 22

first_imglArtisanal productionCan some of the speciality breads on the market live up to the claims that they make better bread?lRetarder proversWe review the essential kit for time-managing your bread production and look at options available on the marketlIBIEBritish Baker reports on the latest innovations on show at the recent bakery trade show, held in Las Vegaslast_img

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Taylors escapes the axe for a second time

first_imgLancashire-based firm Taylors the Bakers has been saved from administration for the second time in less than a year, after administrators RSM Tenon sold the firm back to the bakery’s existing management in a pre-pack deal.The Ashton-under-Lyne firm went into administration on 8 February 2011, with the new company name, Taylors the Bakers 2011 Limited, registered at Companies House on 20 January 2011.A spokesperson for RSM Tenon said the completion of the deal had secured the future of the business, along with 120 jobs. The wholesale firm makes oven-bottom muffins for several major multiples as well as schools, hospitals and sandwich shops.In March 2010, the bakery known then as Sunfresh Bakers Ltd went into administration, with the assets and goodwill bought by its directors Stephen and Mark Taylor.>>Jobs saved as Sunfresh sells >>Bank revalues Sunfresh business by another £70klast_img read more

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Sen. Young: Incredibly talented potential nominees, including Judge Amy Coney Barrett

first_img WhatsApp Twitter Google+ Facebook Pinterest Sen. Young: Incredibly talented potential nominees, including Judge Amy Coney Barrett Facebook Google+ IndianaLocalNews Twitter (Photo supplied/U.S. Senator Todd Young) Sen. Todd Young says he believes the Senate should act once the president announces his nominee for the next justice to serve on the Unites States Supreme Court, Saturday.Young, a Republican, said he would dutifully evaluate the nominee’s qualifications, but that he believes there’s precedent to support the quick action of the president in appointing someone to serve, following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.“When this Republican President was elected in 2016, and when the American people expanded the Republican majority in the Senate elections of 2018, the expectation of the American people was that should a Supreme Court vacancy arise that that vacancy should be filled,” said Young, in a Tuesday news conference in Washington.Young said he believes Hoosiers want him to act, so he will.“The President has put forward a list of incredibly talented potential nominees, including Indiana’s own Judge Amy Coney Barrett, but I think any of the judges that the President has been discussing in recent days would be an excellent choice. It is my intention to dutifully evaluate the records of whoever the President ultimately nominates and to ensure bold action following his nomination.”Young said he believes the American people will “be proud of” whomever is nominated and is ultimately appointed to the country’s highest court.Sen. Mike Braun, Indiana’s junior senator, also a Republican, said in a Tuesday conference call that he is also in favor of a justice being appointed before the presidential election, and he favors Barrett. By Network Indiana – September 23, 2020 0 515 Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleDr. Woody Myers says he’ll be tough about face masks if elected GovernorNext articleSen. Braun: Vote to fill Ginsburg’s seat on the Supreme Court should happen before election Network Indianalast_img read more

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Government response: Statement on former Ofcom board member

first_imgIn the summer of 2016, Bill Emmott stepped down as chair of Ofcom’s Content Board and as a non-executive director on the main Board, posts to which he had been appointed in December 2015. The parties were unable to agree the terms of Mr Emmott’s departure.Appointments to Ofcom are the responsibility of the Secretary of State for the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS). Mr Emmott subsequently brought judicial review proceedings in the High Court against the Secretary of State, challenging the decision as to how his appointment should be formally brought to an end.During the time that he was in post, Mr Emmott, a distinguished former Editor of the Economist, brought substantial editorial and leadership experience to both the Content Board and main Board.The parties now recognise that his departure from the post reflected changed circumstances since his recruitment and have agreed formal terms to resolve the dispute between them.The DCMS is grateful to Mr Emmott for his significant contribution and commitment to Ofcom.last_img read more

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