Scotiabank Digital Factory commences production in Canada

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Scotiabank officially opened the doors today to its Canadian Digital Factory, a dedicated digital production facility designed to drive collaboration and creativity as well as to improve our customers’ experience in areas such as mobile and digital banking transactions, account openings, loan adjudication and mortgage lending.The 70,000 square foot facility, located in Toronto just a few blocks away from Scotiabank’s global corporate headquarters, will employ digital, design, engineering and agile specialists. The space is designed to facilitate collaboration, creativity and real-time direct customer input to develop innovative solutions.Scotiabank is creating a network of Digital Factories including one in each of the Pacific Alliance countries of Mexico, Peru, Chile and Colombia. These Factories will serve as incubators for new products, services and solutions for Scotiabank’s 23 million customers around the world. About Scotiabank Scotiabank is Canada’s international bank and a leading financial services provider in North America, Latin America, the Caribbean and Central America, and Asia-Pacific. We are dedicated to helping our 23 million customers become better off through a broad range of advice, products and services, including personal and commercial banking, wealth management and private banking, corporate and investment banking, and capital markets. With a team of more than 88,000 employees and assets of $896 billion (as at October 31, 2016), Scotiabank trades on the Toronto (TSX: BNS) and New York Exchanges (NYSE: BNS). For more information, please visit www.scotiabank.com and follow us on Twitter @ScotiabankViews.About the Digital FactoryThe Digital Factory is a hub for creation and incubation of new and partner-led ideas to deliver game-changing solutions for Scotiabank customers. The Digital Factory is a cornerstone of Scotiabank’s digital transformation, and is focused on reinventing how banking serves people by first reinventing the way we work. Visit us at digitalfactory.scotiabank.com. Follow us on Twitter @Scotia_df / Instagram @Scotia_df / Facebook at Scotiabank Digital Factory. #ScotiaDFcenter_img Facebook Login/Register With: “All Scotiabankers are deeply proud of our five Digital Factories and the work that is taking place in these facilities,” said Brian Porter, President and CEO, Scotiabank. “These creative workspaces are inspiring and encouraging entrepreneurism, accelerating delivery times and allowing our teams to sharpen their focus on meeting the needs of our customers. They are also playing an important role in spurring FinTech innovation, productivity and job growth in their local markets.”Designed by Interior Architects, the new Digital Factory facility in Toronto was designed based on ideas and input from Scotiabank employees to create a space that reflects the diversity of workstyles and the need for a creative, agile and fun work environment.Quick Facts about the Scotiabank Digital Factory Space in Toronto: Customer Usability Lab: Customer feedback informs our test-and-learn development culture every step of the way. The Customer Usability Lab space at the Digital Factory is a place where our teams meet with our customers to test our solutions as we build them. It helps our teams understand what our customers want and need, and enables us to capture real time feedback and iterate on what has already been designed.Scrum-ready workspaces: From large huddle rooms to private meeting booths, the technology-forward design enables teams to collaborate across the Bank’s footprint, and drives quality and efficiency of technical production for employees and scrum teams who use the agile methodology. The neighbourhood themes and meeting rooms are named after people and technologies that disrupted and transformed their industries.Artful design and inspiration: Artwork throughout acknowledges Scotiabank’s history and inspires the future. The Digital Factory logo – a fusion between the traditional factory gear and a pixelated gear – encapsulates the transformation from analog to digital and Scotiabank’s broader digital transformation. Proudly on display is a stylized Scotiabank Coat of Arms from the original version designed in 1921. Informed by interviews with Digital Factory employees, Toronto artists created a mural that represents Scotiabank’s evolving role for banking customers around the world, grounded in the bank’s core values: respect, integrity, passion and accountability.Security haven: A biometric security access solution captures and matches four fingerprints with a single hand movement. It implements contactless technology, allowing residents to remain on the move when passing through a control point. Twitterlast_img read more

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Single Girl Problems Any Single Black Men in Toronto

first_imgFinding love in the GTA is hard but didn’t stop me from finding the funny in it… Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: BIO:  Comedian Sarah St-Fleur, better known by her stage name Double XL, is unquestionably the long-awaited breath of fresh air Quebec’s comedy needed. Born in Montreal to Haitian parents, DoubleXL began her artistic career very early through multiple dance performances and hosting at numerous variety shows on local and international stages. Undeniably passionate, dynamic and social DoubleXL exudes an electrifying stage presence that leaves no one indifferent. With this contagious energy, she was able to quickly got noticed in the comedy scene. Since her beginnings in comedy in 2014, she has performed in several major events such as the Couscous Comedy Show, the Pikilz Comedy Show and at Comedy Works for the first part of the well known comedian Eddy King. DoubleXL does not believe in limiting herself. In addition to performing  as much as she can, she writes and produces weekly humorous scketchs in French, English and Creole. These capsules available online have already won the heart of the public, allowing her to share her passion for laughter with a virtual audience. With such an explosive career start, only time will tell how far DoubleXL will go to entertain the world..FOLLOW SARAH ON SOCIAL MEDIA:FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/DoubleXlBiggerNBetter/INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/doublexl_comic/YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCw8ziN88TKO5DAQYdHENuEg Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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Kendrick Lamar surprises fans at Toronto popup shop

first_imgAhead of Tuesday night’s hotly anticipated Kendrick Lamar concert at the Air Canada Centre, fans showed their loyalty by flocking to the rapper’s pop-up store in Toronto.And “King Kendrick” showed Toronto some love back.At around 3 p.m., the rapper from Compton, Calif., made a surprise appearance at the Livestock store at 116 Spadina Ave., thrilling the hundreds who had waited in line for merchandise. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment “It was amazing,” said Arshan Raza, 17, who touched Lamar’s hand. “It didn’t feel real.READ MORE Twitter Advertisement Facebook Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With:last_img read more

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Writing Advice From a Newly Minted Nobel Winner

first_imgIt’s tempting to talk of writing—the art of it, the craft of it, the lifestyle of it—as a kind of romance. Writers of serious literature (according to, at least, many writers of serious literature) do not simply type stark words onto blank pages; instead, they stare into an abyss and reach into their souls and find, if they are fortunate, the swirling fires of Prometheus. “We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect,” Anaïs Nin said, which is beautiful and true and also objectively incorrect: Writing is delicious work, but it is for the most part simply work. It’s often lonely. It’s rarely romantic. (I am not a writer of serious literature, but I am a writer, and I am writing this while sipping stale coffee from a mug that’s in bad need of a wash.) Writing is a craft in the way that carpentry is a craft: There’s art to it, sure, and a certain inspiration required of it, definitely, but for the most part you’re just sawing and sanding and getting dust in your eyes.Because of all that, it’s refreshing—and it is also a profound public service— when writers of literature use their public platforms not just to celebrate literature, but also to put the creation of literature in its place. And it’s especially refreshing when writers at the highest levels of the field do that. One of them has been Kazuo Ishiguro, the British novelist and the latest winner of the Nobel Prize.On Thursday, the Nobel Committee announced that Ishiguro is its 2017 laureate for literature—a decision, the Committee noted in its citation, that came in part because the author, “in novels of great emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world.” Almost immediately after the announcement was made, a story from The Guardian, written by Ishiguro himself and published in December of 2014, began circulating on social media. The piece is headlined, “Kazuo Ishiguro: How I Wrote The Remains of the Day in Four Weeks.” And it outlines, in great detail, how, indeed, the author overcame writer’s block—made worse by the banal demands of life itself—to summon the words that would become the novel that remains Ishiguro’s most famous contribution to the literary world. Twitter Kazuo Ishiguro – Photo by David Levenson / Getty Images LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment READ MORE Advertisementcenter_img Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisementlast_img read more

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MEET NICHOLAS ARNOLD – JERRY LEWIS TRIBUTE ARTIST AND PERFORMER

first_img Login/Register With: Who inspired you to follow your dream to pursue acting?I think I’ve always been driven in any project I’ve pursued, whether that’s been a film or a performance piece. When the Jerry Lewis thing started I was always looking for ways to improv upon it and get better; physically and vocally. I suppose I was inspired by those legends of the past – Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Frank Sinatra, Red Skelton. I was especially drawn to physical comedians and wanted to figure out how I could replicate or reimagine some of their intensely athletic routines. I always thought “well if Jerry Lewis was 18 and he was able to bend his legs like that, maybe I can too!” The rest is history.What challenges have you faced in the entertainment industry? What has been your most rewarding experience?The biggest challenge I’ve faced is not feeling like I fit the mould of an actor. I’m not a musical theatre guy and yet I’ve found myself heading professional musical concerts backed by live bands. I didn’t study acting or music, yet I’m going head to head with people who have. When your “thing” is something that doesn’t exist anymore; in that, the nightclub, variety show is a thing of the past, it can be very difficult for you or your agent to find a place for you or figure out how to “sell” you to casting directors. At the same time, this very unique route I’ve taken has led to me connecting with some incredible people and fortunate enough to land a role in the show, “Dean and Jerry: What Might Have Been” which has been performing off-and-on for the last two years. I count myself incredibly lucky to revisit the Jerry Lewis role in this show amongst a plethora of professional veterans in different venues and to different audiences. That’s so rare. I’m not a standup comic and I’m not an improviser which is the go-to for comedians, yet I work hard to display rapid-fire comedic routines on stage in that. It can be extremely confusing because you sit back and go, “Okay, that show is awesome! And so much fun. How can I do more of that?” And there’s just not that many shows like that out there. It comes down to creating your own work. From there, certain things (like the Dean and Jerry show) fall into place.What is your favourite type of character to play?Jerry Lewis! Hah! No, but I do enjoy playing the meek or bumbling idiot. Anything that allows me to do a prat fall or flip over a few tables. That said — and this goes back to what I mentioned earlier — about feeling more like a performer rather than an actor, the moments in “Dean and Jerry: What Might Have Been” when I step out of the role and become ‘Nick’ for a moment, talking to the audience about Jerry and telling his story — that’s when I really feel like I’m doing what I’m meant to be doing. So I suppose that means I enjoy moments where I’m able to bring myself (whether it’s an element of myself or just simply me) to the stage. I’d love to do more emceeing in that regard. Advertisement Facebook What market do you currently work in? Are there other areas you would like to work?I’m based out of Toronto and have only performed in a few community shows here. Professionally, the “Dean and Jerry: What Might Have Been” show and various other nostalgia-based entertainment that I’ve been involved in have taken me everywhere but Toronto including Arizona.What advice would you give to someone new trying to make it in the acting industry?Don’t be afraid to stumble into things. The Jerry Lewis thing seemed weird at first. And still does when I explain it to people. It’s not an impersonation that I do. I’m Nick on stage. A very Jerry version of Nick. But I’m Nick. But back when I started, in retirement homes and nursing homes, I was doing a straight-up impersonation and it was gimmicky and weird. But it led to me landing my first professional gigs, to some amazing professional relationships and incredible experiences on stage. Listen to that inner-voice. It does not lie.What fuels your passion?I love talking to an audience. I love breaking that fourth wall and connecting with them, sitting on the edge of a stage with a microphone, whether I’m singing them a song or telling them a story. I love, love, love it. That’s what keeps me going and keeps me driven to keep doing shows and work like that.What is something about you that most people would never guess?I think those that only know me from my live comedy performing would be surprised to know I’ve directed some pretty dark films and those that know me strictly for my filmmaking would be surprised to see me running around like Jerry Lewis. It depends on when and how you know me. Aside from that, I’m actually pretty shy and quiet until I’ve gotten to know somebody. Maybe people wouldn’t guess that?If you were to do it all over again, would you do things exactly the same? Do you have any regrets? Successes that make you proud?Yes, I would do things the exact same. Of course! I personally let the past stay in the past. There was no way to predict how some of the cool, professional experiences I’ve had would have come about. They were all the products of a long build up of random events. I just kept saying yes to things and kept trying things — listening to that inner voice. I wouldn’t change a thing.My biggest success has come from doing a Jerry Lewis Tribute which I initially started out doing at retirement homes, graduating to live theatre and now touring for the last two years with a show called: “Dean and Jerry: What Might Have Been”, a tribute concert examining the partnership between Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis backed by a live band: http://wwwmorrisburgleader.ca/2016/10/26/dean-and-jerry-what-might-have-been-draws-cheers-at-playhouse/I also talk at length about this in the first episode of my new podcast which I just recently launched. In this podcast, I’ll be telling the stories of 6 nostalgia-based entertainers in North America, including Dan Kamin (a Chaplin expert who trained Robert Downey Jr. for the title role and Johnny Depp in Benny and Joon). You can check that out here: https://soundcloud.com/user-160850684AGENT: Nicholas is represented by Teri Ritter of Ritter Talent Agency.FOLLOW NICHOLAS ON SOCIAL MEDIA:WEBSITE: https://www.imnicholasarnold.com/FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/nicholas.arnold07TWITTER: https://twitter.com/NicholasArnold Nicholas Arnold is a Jerry Lewis Tribute Artist and Performer in Toronto, Ontario.As a child, did you want to be an actor, or did it fall into place through other activities?I actually wanted to be a filmmaker. And did end up pursuing that goal and achieving it to some success. I would say the acting and performing definitely fell into place through other activities. I enjoyed doing it from an early age but it wasn’t something I was solely focused on. I wanted to direct. I wanted to write. At the end of the day, I wanted to tell stories – and I’ve realized that’s all I’m really doing as a performer. At the end of the day, I’m still tapping into whatever that dream was as a young kid. I had done school plays and some community theatre while still in high school but I fell into performing as a professional career when I began doing a Jerry Lewis impression in my late teens and early twenties. I looked like him a little and could sound like him and move like him and it dawned on me that I could potentially turn this into some kind of gig. So by the time I was 21, I was touring a self-written, self-directed one-man tribute to Jerry Lewis to retirement homes and communities. That led to a few more professional bookings, and within a few years I found myself performing in professional theatres and with professional companies across North America backed by veteran musicians. Performing truly was something that just fell into place. And I say performing because I almost see it as less of an “acting” thing. My style of “acting” and performing is pulled directly from the vaudeville and nightclub era, reinvented for a modern audience. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Twitter Written By:  Darlene MorrisonIf you are an aspiring talent and would like to be featured in our Aspiring Talent SeriesContact Darlene via email at morrisonmediasocial@gmail.comOpen to all (e.g. Actors, Models, Singers, Dancers, Producers, Directors, etc.)last_img read more

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Tragically Hip opens doors to Bathouse studio for a glimpse of music

first_imgThe Bathouse studio is a stone-cut structure that was built as a coach house, but became the Hip’s makeshift recording space in the early 1990s. Here they put some of their biggest albums — including “Trouble at the Henhouse” and “Phantom Power” — to tape and filmed a number of music videos.Well over 100 other musicians, including Matt Good, Sarah Harmer and members of Broken Social Scene, have also hammered down ideas for their songs here over the years.Each artist leaves behind stories that Dave (Billy Ray) Koster, head of the Hip’s stage crew and the Bathouse’s caretaker, loves to share with visitors.One of his favourites is the time Blue Rodeo frontman Jim Cuddy recorded a song, strolled down the front porch and took a quick dip in the pool outside the house. He returned a few minutes later, still dripping wet, to listen to a playback of the tape.For most of the artists, the Bathouse becomes their temporary home away from home. They’ll sleep in one of its four bedrooms and balance studio time with enjoying the property, which is steps away from Lake Ontario.Gord Downie spent much time here, Koster said, and slept in an upstairs bedroom with a view of the waterfront through the trees.Tucked at the back of the property is an attached rehearsal space Koster called “the Hip’s sacred clubhouse.” It’s the only working space in the Bathouse that’s almost entirely off limits for musicians who rent the place to record.The Hip prepared for many of their concerts here, including the 2016 Man Machine Poem tour, which marked Downie’s final shows.Koster said the Hip maintained a strict regiment as they prepared for those important dates. They’d rehearse for an hour before taking a break to grab a beer or a smoke.But Downie remained focused during that time. While everyone else relaxed, he jumped on an exercise bike in the corner of the room and pedalled away to build his strength.“He worked incredibly hard here to be able to do those 14 shows,” Koster said.“We did more rehearsing for that entire tour than we did for all the other ones combined — just to get him back to where he was.”Aside from the stories, the Bathouse is stacked with memorabilia.In one room, they’ve framed the winning Juno Award envelopes for “Trouble at the Henhouse.” There’s also many pieces of artwork originally used on their album covers.Many guests were especially surprised to encounter the mysterious yellow device from the “Phantom Power” cover sitting on a shelf.Koster said it’s actually an airplane’s flight line tester that drummer Johnny Fay purchased at a New York City junk shop.He’s known for “buying things and figuring out what they do later,” Koster explained.When Fay brought the hefty device back to Canada, and learned that it was useless for producing audio, the band decided it would make a cool album cover.They screwed a small “Phantom Power” title plate on the front and asked a photographer to shoot some photos.The rest is Tragically Hip history.by DAVID FRIEND, THE CANADIAN PRESS – Follow @dfriend on Twitter LOYALIST TOWNSHIP, Ont. – Stories from the Tragically Hip’s fabled Bathouse studio came to light on Thursday at a rare open house for a small group of friends and family.The 19th century home in the quiet town of Bath, Ont., a short drive from Kingston, was grounds for a gathering organized by Hip band members and Up Cannabis, a licensed marijuana producer they’re invested in.But as much as the night highlighted their stake in the legalization of marijuana, nothing could overshadow the legendary property. Advertisement Twitter Advertisement The 19th century home in the quiet town of Bath, Ont., a short drive from Kingston, was grounds for a gathering organized by Hip band members and Up Cannabis, a licensed marijuana producer they’re invested in. A section of the studio, in which many guests were especially surprised to encounter the mysterious yellow device from the “Phantom Power” cover sitting on a shelf, is seen on Thursday, May 24, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/David Friendcenter_img Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebooklast_img read more

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LOST NEIL YOUNG AND JONI MITCHELL CONCERT RECORDINGS UNCOVERED BY ARCHIVISTS

first_imgAdvertisement Twitter Each was recorded in professional audio quality on seven-inch reel-to-reel tapes. They’re now being shopped to record labels for an official release, organizers say.Other tapes found in the collection include performances by Tim Buckley, Doc Watson and Odetta. Login/Register With: Archivists have known about the elusive recordings of Young and Mitchell for years.The tapes were first rediscovered six years ago in the possession of a private collector, but then disappeared and were deemed lost for good before turning up again a few weeks ago, said president Alan Glenn in a statement.Officials from the historical project say Canterbury House concerts were usually held on Friday and Saturday nights from 1965 to 1971. Most of the shows were recorded, they say, but the “loose atmosphere of the day” made it difficult to monitor the whereabouts of tapes.Other musicians who played the space and whose tapes haven’t been found include Gordon Lightfoot, Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention, Tom Rush, Buddy Guy and Doc Boggs. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Facebook Advertisement Advertisement Live concert recordings of Neil Young and Joni Mitchell considered lost for decades have been unearthed by Michigan archivists.The Canadian folk legends are among a number of historic music performances recently discovered by the non-profit Michigan History Project.All of the recordings were made at the Canterbury House, the Episcopal student ministry at the University of Michigan campus in the late 1960s. The space doubled as a place of worship and a concert venue during the era with some of the biggest folk acts of the time performing there.last_img read more

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INTERVIEW TRAVELERS MACKENZIE PORTER

first_imgMacKenzie Porter Advertisement Advertisement Facebook MacKenzie Porter: I think that even though it’s a sci-fi show, a lot of it is based in relationships and how people feel, even though they are going through a situation that is a little bit more far-fetched, like time travel. But it is still showing human emotion through that, which is an overall concept that is immediately present through seasons 1, 2 and 3. And specifically in 3, I think that it touches on it even more, the realness of how people feel. We talk about coming from the future, and they don’t think that they are going to be affected by love or by family, like Nesta (Cooper)’s character with her baby. None of us have expected to feel the things that we feel now, coming back in time. So I think that this is a cool thing that we touch on throughout the season. So when I talk to people, I say “if you’re not a sci-fi fan, you’ll still be a fan of the show”, because there’s so much love in it, it’s almost like a drama / sci-fi.BT: You’re part of an interesting team on the show and the ensemble seem to get along like a team, on and off set. Tell me about that group dynamic. MP: With all of the actors on set, it’s really been amazing how tight we have all gotten. I think that inspired me every day to go to work. Nesta is one of my best friends, Jared (Abrahamson) is one of my best friends, Eric (McCormack) and I are super close, Patrick (Gilmore) and I are super close, and Reilly (Dolman) too. I feel like it doesn’t happen that often. I’ve been on other shows in which the show wrapped and you don’t hang with those people any more. But in three weeks, I’m going to New York to hang out with Jared and his girlfriend, my boyfriend and I are going to hang out with them, we’re super close, Nesta and her boyfriend might come. So it’s like a family, and that just makes everything on set because the team is like a family. It’s almost like this tangled web of reality and script, which is really cool. All the personalities click and we all play different roles within the family. For example, Eric is obviously the leader of the show and our little crew, and he’s more of the father figure within the group, where he has to somehow wrangle all the kids to settle down. [laughs] Jared is the goofball of the group, and everyone has their part. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Advertisement Login/Register With: “I’m so happy to be sharing what I’ve been doing for the last couple of years!”, MacKenzie Porter excitedly told us over the phone recently. The multi-talented actress-singer-songwriter is set to launch the first two tracks from her worldwide debut EP this Friday (we had the opportunity to listen to the new tracks, and they are outstanding). And if that is not enough, Porter’s Netflix original series Travelers (in which she features as the complex Marcy) returns for its third season in a few weeks, thus making her the biggest breakout star in a popular sci-fi series and soon-to-be worldwide country pop icon since…you know, the Alberta-born MacKenzie Porter just might be the very first! That being said, she’s also one of the most humble, generous and self-aware individuals that we have ever interviewed, so the prospect of dual stardom clearly won’t get to her head.Eric McCormack, MacKenzie Porter, Reilly Dolman, Jared Abrahamson, and Nesta Cooper in Travelers (2016) – Photo by Jeff Weddell/NetflixThe following is a condensed and edited version of our chat with the lovely MacKenzie Porter.Brief Take: Why do you think Travelers appeals so much to such a wide audience? Twitterlast_img read more

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TORONTO ILLUSTRATOR TEAMS UP WITH PAUL MCCARTNEY ON CHILDRENS BOOK

first_imgAdvertisement Toronto-based illustrator Kathryn Durst says she’s found a true collaborator in Paul McCartney after working closely with the rock legend to bring his bedtime tale for grandchildren to the page.McCartney revealed the cover of his upcoming children’s book “Hey Grandude!” featuring Durst’s drawings on social media Wednesday. Advertisement Durst says some authors take a hands-off approach to the visual side of storytelling, but she and McCartney spoke several times on the phone to discuss his ideas for the illustrations.She says McCartney had direct input into the “retired hippie-ish” design of the titular Grandude, inspired by a nickname by from one of his eight grandchildren.When she met McCartney in Montreal last fall, Durst says she felt like she was seeing an “old friend.”“Hey Grandude!” is set to be published by Random House in September.THE CANADIAN PRESS Login/Register With: Twitter Facebook Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

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LONDON CAME CALLING FOR ACTOR AND PLAYWRIGHT HALEY MCGEE BUT NOW SHES

first_img Login/Register With: In the mid-2010s, Haley McGee had an envy-inducing acting career in Canada: between 2014 and 2016, she premiered Hannah Moscovitch’s Infinity at Tarragon Theatre, appeared in the Off-Mirvish production of George F. Walker’s Dead Metaphor, toured with Canadian Stage’s live film noir Helen Lawrence and performed in The Public Servant, which she co-created with Common Boots Theatre.But there was one problem.“I wanted to say things. And I wanted to have more control over what I was saying. I had this urge to be creating my own work and touring my own work,” McGee says over the phone. Advertisement Advertisement Haley McGee in The Ex-Boyfriend Yard Sale, being presented as part of the Progress Festival. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Canada looking for input from Yukon communities on massive environment clean up

first_imgShirley McLeanAPTN NewsCommunity consultations are ongoing this week in the Yukon as Canada gets input on how best to clean up one of the country’s largest environmental disasters.It’s been 20 years since the former owners abandoned the Faro zinc-lead mine site after filing for bankruptcy.The mine operated from 1969 to 1998.It was once the largest open pit mine of its kind in the world and is roughly the size of Victoria, B.C.Today the site is one of the most complex remediation projects in Canada.smclean@aptn.ca@shirlmcleanlast_img read more

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Calgary camp in support of Colten Boushie is growing

first_imgTamara PimentelAPTN NewsThe Teepee Village outside the courthouse in Calgary is growing.The village was set up after Saskatchewan farmer Gerald Stanley was acquitted in the death of Red Pheasant Cree man Colten Boushie.It joins other camps across the country that are holding vigil for issues like child welfare in Regina, justice in Toronto, and the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project in British Columbia.The camp in Calgary has become so big, keeping it all together is now a full-time job for the organizer.tpimentel@aptn.ca@aptntamaralast_img read more

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Indigenous man was pepper sprayed before fatal shooting by RCMP in Saskatchewan

first_imgThe Canadian PressA police officer says an Indigenous man who died in 2017 after being shot by Saskatchewan RCMP was hit with pepper spray first.An inquest into the death Brydon Whitstone heard that officers in North Battleford, Sask., had boxed in a vehicle carrying Whitstone and a passenger after a police chase.RCMP Sgt. Pernell St. Pierre told the inquest he broke the car’s passenger side window to get a better look inside.He said he released pepper spray inside the car but Whitstone did not react to it.St. Pierre said Whitstone, who was 22, also didn’t respond to calls from officers to show his hands.The inquest had already heard that Whitstone put his right hand into his pants after he was told to get out of the car, even though he didn’t have a weapon.RCMP officers testified they followed the sedan Whitstone was in because it matched the description of one involved in a possible drive-by shooting, but the car failed to stop.The inquest heard the car Whitstone was driving crashed into two police vehicles and was badly damaged before it finally came to rest.Const. Jerry Abbott, the officer who shot Whitstone, told the inquest Whitstone appeared to reach for something in his pocket which Abbott thought was a gun, so he shot the man from Onion Lake, Sask., twice in the chest.An investigation by Regina police determined no criminal charges should be filed against police.The inquest is expected to conclude Friday.last_img read more

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Longtime Miss America staffer named its executive director

first_imgATLANTIC CITY, N.J. – A longtime Miss America Organization staffer has been named its executive director of operations.Karen Nocella’s appointment was announced Wednesday. She will oversee day-to-day activities in the organization’s Atlantic City office.Nocella has worked for more than 30 years in public relations and marketing. She joined the organization in 2008 as a tour manager for Miss America and has served as business manager and executive director for promotions and licensing.Before joining Miss America, Nocella worked in public and community relations for the Philadelphia Phillies.Nocella’s appointment is the latest change for the organization since leaked emails surfaced late last year showing CEO Sam Haskell and others disparaging the appearance and intellect of former Miss Americas.Haskell resigned Dec. 23. Most of the previous board members also have resigned.last_img read more

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Brexit deal almost done but Spain holds out over Gibraltar

first_imgLONDON — European Union diplomats are meeting to finalize the draft divorce agreement between Britain and the bloc, amid a warning from Spain that it will oppose the deal if it isn’t guaranteed a say over the future of Gibraltar.Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez tweeted that Britain and Spain “remain far away” on the issue and “if there are no changes, we will veto Brexit.”Spain wants the future of the tiny British territory at the tip of the Iberian Peninsula to be a bilateral issue between Madrid and London.Spain doesn’t have a veto on the withdrawal agreement, which does not have to be approved unanimously. But it could hold up a future free-trade deal between Britain and the EU, which would require approval of all 27 EU nations.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Wait until Trans Mountain pipe built before buying in Indigenous investors told

first_imgCALGARY — The consultant who helped broker a $545-million investment by two northern Alberta Indigenous communities in a new Suncor Energy Inc. storage tank farm says similar stakes in the Trans Mountain pipeline shouldn’t take place until after its expansion is built.Barrie Robb, a principal with Fivars Consulting Ltd. of Calgary, says he would advise Indigenous groups to ensure all regulatory and construction risk is removed from the project before they take on an investment that could be measured in billions of dollars.When the federal government bought Trans Mountain and its controversial expansion project from Kinder Morgan Canada Ltd. last year for $4.5 billion, it signalled that it did not intend to hold it for the long term and that potential buyers included Indigenous groups.That prospect was welcomed by Indigenous and industry speakers at the Indigenous Energy Summit on the Tsuut’ina Nation just south of Calgary on Wednesday.Trans Mountain CEO Ian Anderson said during a speech that he is focused on getting the pipeline built — a process that has been stalled since a court decision set aside its National Energy Board approval last fall — and any sale will be up to his new employer, the federal government.Stephen Buffalo, CEO of the sponsoring Indian Resource Council, says he remains committed to using energy resource development to support prosperity on Canadian reserves despite “Facebook warriors” who have branded him a “sell-out” on social media.The Indian Resource Council, which has about 130 members, is to hold its annual general meeting on Thursday. The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Date not yet set for Napoleon murder trial

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – No date has yet been set for the trial of Leon Wokeley, who is charged with second-degree murder in connection with the death of Pamela Napoleon nearly four years ago.Wokeley, who is also charged with arson and indecency to human remains in connection with Napoleon’s death, appeared in court on Monday, June 11th for a hearing that would set a date for his trial. He entered a plea of not guilty to all three charges he’s facing at an arraignment hearing in Fort St. John on May 23rd.Wokeley’s lawyer Georges Rivard said that no date was set at Monday’s hearing because more steps need to be taken before the trial begins, though he did not elaborate on what those steps were. Wokeley is next scheduled to appear in court in Fort St. John on Tuesday, July 3rd at 10:00 a.m.last_img read more

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PRRD says it has a contractor to facilitate Old Fort residents to

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Peace River Regional District says that a plan has been implemented to allow evacuated residents of the Old Fort subdivision to gather their belongings and vehicles, and to also prepare their empty homes for the coming winter.The PRRD’s Emergency Operations Centre says that the plan has been developed with a contractor who is experienced in working in emergency situations and has the equipment and resources to assist evacuees.“At this time, it is not safe for ANYONE to enter the evacuation order area – from land or by water. Volunteers MUST NOT enter this area and MUST not transport anyone to the EVACUATION ORDER area,” said the PRRD in an update on its website. The Regional District added that the plan will be put into action once word is received from a geotechnical engineer that the hillside above the community is stable enough that it will not suddenly fail.On Tuesday, the Regional District cancelled Temporary Entry Permits for Old Fort residents to retrieve belongings from their homes, after geotechnical engineers from Westrek Geotechnical Services said that stress cracks in the hillside above the community have continued to form and land slippage has also been observed, causing the Old Fort Road to crack, buckle and slip.last_img read more

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