Bryan Batt & More Tapped for Grey Gardens, Starring Betty Buckley

first_img Broadway vets Bryan Batt (Saturday Night Fever) and Josh Young (Amazing Grace) will join the previously reported Betty Buckley and Rachel York in Grey Gardens at CTG/Ahmanson Theatre. Directed by Michael Wilson, the production will play a limited engagement July 6 through August 14. Opening night is set for July 13. Next stop New York?!The cast will also include Peyton Ella, Sarah Hunt, Simon Jones, Katie Silverman, Davon Williams, Olivia Curry, Rogelio Douglas Jr., Steven Good, Melina Kalomas, Michelle London and Rebecca Spencer.Based on the cult 1975 documentary of the same name, Grey Gardens features a book by Doug Wright, music by Scott Frankel and lyrics by Michael Korie. The tuner concerns both the deliciously eccentric aunt and cousin of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, who were once among the brightest names in the pre-Camelot social register, but became East Hampton’s most notorious recluses, living in a dilapidated 28-room mansion. Set in two eras—in 1941 when the estate was in its prime and in 1973 when it was reduced to squalor—the musical tells the alternatively hilarious and heartbreaking story of two indomitable individuals, Edith Bouvier Beale (Buckley) and her adult daughter “Little” Edie (York). View Comments Bryan Batt(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser)last_img read more

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We Celebrate the Rockettes’ New York Spectacular

first_img© Justin “Squigs” Robertson NY Spectacular Starring the Radio City Rockettes View Comments About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home. The Rockettes are back at Radio City Music Hall for a summer stint in New York Spectacular. The new show, penned by Douglas Carter Beane and directed and choreographed by Mia Michaels, follows two kids, who while on a vacation in New York, are separated from their parents. With the help of the Rockettes, the city comes to life to show them its many wonders and reunite the family.To celebrate the production, Broadway.com resident artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson penned this sketch. There’s Danny Gardner as Dad, Kacie Sheik as Mom, Euan Morton as Mercury, Kecia Lewis as Busker, Jacob Ben Widmar as the Mad Hatter and Vincent Crocilla as Jacob, along with Jenna Ortega as Emily (a role she shares with Lilla Crawford).Broadway.com wishes the team a happy high-kicking summer…the show is running through August 7. Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 7, 2016last_img read more

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Your Top 10 Fave Hairspray Songs, Ranked

first_img(Photos: New Line Cinema and Paul Kolnik) It’s Monday, Broadway fans, and we’re gonna shake it, shimmy it with all of our might! The Tony-winning musical Hairspray welcomed fans to the ’60s at the Neil Simon Theatre 14 years ago on August 15. Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman’s ultra-catchy songs have stayed with us ever since, and we cannot wait to hear Hairspray Live!’s starry cast sing through it on December 7. In honor of the Broadway show’s anniversary, we asked you to rank your favorite songs from the big, blonde, beautiful musical. (Newcomer Maddie Baillio previously told us hers—we can’t wait to see her belt “Good Morning, Baltimore”!) Check out your top 10 below! “I Can Hear the Bells” “The Nicest Kids in Town” “Big Girl Now” “I Know Where I’ve Been” “Run and Tell That” “Miss Baltimore Crabs” “Without Love” “Good Morning, Baltimore” “You Can’t Stop the Beat” “Welcome to the ’60s” View Commentslast_img read more

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Watch The Color Purple’s Cynthia Erivo Discuss Her Landmark Year

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 8, 2017 Related Shows The Color Purple Broadway’s The Color Purple is set to shutter at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre on January 8, the same day its Tony-winning breakout star Cynthia Erivo will turn 30. Her 29th year has been a doozy: she garnered a Tony Award and a Grammy nomination for her Broadway debut, ran a marathon, sang for President Obama (twice) and went platinum blonde. She appeared on CBS This Morning on January 6 to discuss her landmark year and receive some kind words from producer and The Color Purple film star Oprah. “I stand in amazement at what you have been able to do,” Lady O said, causing Erivo to become emotional. Take a look at the interview below. View Commentscenter_img Cynthia Erivo Star Files Cynthia Erivolast_img read more

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Spend a Day in the Life with Hamilton’s Mandy Gonzalez

first_imgVIEW THE PHOTO GALLERYPhotos: Matthew Murphy | Styling: David Withrow | Photography Assistant: Evan Zimmerman | Hair & Makeup: KeLeen Snowgren | Some Wardrobe Provided By: Austin Scarlett Ever wonder what it’s like to be a Schuyler Sister in the greatest city in the world? Hamilton’s Angelica Mandy Gonzalez showed us how she makes it all “werk” with a peek into a day in her life through the lens of Broadway.com contributor Matthew Murphy. Here’s Gonzalez’s typical day, from heading into New York City in style to rehearsing for her upcoming 54 Below show to ending each day starring in a revolutionary hit. Check out the photos here and let Gonzalez talk you through the gallery of her non-stop day in our video below! Related Shows from $149.00center_img View Comments Hamiltonlast_img read more

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Hurricane season

first_imgBy April SorrowUniversity of GeorgiaThe probability of Georgia being directly hit by a hurricane in any given year is low. Regardless, Georgians should prepare just in case. Because when one does hit, it will be devastating, says the state’s climatologist. The Atlantic hurricane season starts June1 and runs to November 30. But tropical systems and the bad weather that comes with them can hit outside of the official season, said David Stooksbury, climatologist and associate professor with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Get a weather radioThe No. 1 way to stay informed of threatening weather is to have a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) radio. A NOAA weather radio sounds an alarm and broadcasts up-to-date details about tornadoes, thunderstorms, flash floods or tropical weather. Make sure you buy one with the Specific Area Message Encoding, or SAME, technology. It can be programmed for particular counties. “You can buy NOAA weather radios at most electronic stores and even some grocery stores,” Stooksbury said. Prepare a survival kitAll Georgians should prepare for stormy weather by assembling an all-hazards kit. As seen with hurricane Katrina, it may take days for help to arrive after a natural or man-made disaster. So, prepare a kit with supplies that will allow you and your family to survive for three to seven days without electricity and clean running water. The most critical supply is at least one gallon of drinking water per person per day for at least three days. More water is needed for cooking and hygiene.Besides water, an all-hazards kit should include nonperishable foods, a hand can opener, first-aid kit, important papers, battery-powered radio, NOAA weather radio, flashlight and extra batteries. A detailed list of recommended contents for an all-hazards kit is available at http://www.ready.gov/america/getakit/index.html. Purchase flood insuranceIt is not only important to have an all-hazards kit, many Georgian’s should look into buying flood insurance, too. “The entire state is vulnerable to impacts from tropical systems,” he said. “While storm surge along the coast and wind damage receive the most attention, inland flooding is a concern statewide, from the coastal plain to the mountains.” Most homeowner insurance policies don’t include flood damage, so it is necessary to purchase an additional policy just to cover these damages. But most policies are fairly inexpensive. Just be sure to purchase a policy at least 30 days before you need it, so it has time to take effect. “Almost any place in south Georgia has a possibility of flooding,” he said. “As we’ve seen this year, heavy rains can flood the lowland piedmont region and cause significant damage.” Don’t forget tornadoesWhile hurricane season is starting, tornado season hasn’t really ended. “Tornadoes are always a risk in Georgia,” Stooksbury said. “While they are more common in the spring and fall, they can occur at any time.” In the event of a tornado, seek shelter in a sturdy building. The lowest level away from windows is the safest place, he said. If one isn’t around, lie down in a ditch or low spot where cars or trees won’t blow on top of you. Don’t stay in a car. “Regardless of where you seek shelter, protect your body, especially your head and neck, from flying debris,” he said. “Use pillows, blankets, coats or whatever you can find to protect yourself.”last_img read more

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Growing green

first_imgGeorgia’s green industry has suffered for several years under the strain of drought and related water restrictions. Continued economic woes, especially in the troubled housing industry, dampened recovery. But the future looks sunnier, according to a University of Georgia economist. “But, all in all, the green industry is expected to be minimally affected in 2010,” he said. “The sun should be rising on the economic horizon, not setting, for the years ahead.” That’s good news for the industry, Stegelin said, but it should be cautious.“As Georgia’s green-industry businesses pull themselves up by their bootstraps, exiting the recession, there are key sensitivities and success factors they should keep in mind,” Stegelin said. Many small operations shifted from specialized, higher-priced, more-profitable plants to lower-valued annual bedding and garden plants grown in pots or flats, which consumers could afford. Some switched to value-added flowering hanging baskets. Regardless of the plant mix they marketed, the prices growers got were low in ‘09, but their costs to produce things were high, resulting in lower profit margins, he said.Looking up“Georgia’s grower-wholesalers should realize a 1.5- to 2-percent growth in annual revenues for the next few years, perhaps through 2015,” Stegelin said. “A very stable forecast that is minus the volatility of the past decade.” As the U.S. dollar depreciates, he expects import competition to decline. A weak U.S. dollar makes U.S. products more affordable to global consumers. Increased consumer spending and gardening activity will stimulate demand, but weather and unusual temperatures affect production and consumption habits.In their annual trends report released in mid-November, the public relations firm Garden Media Group found Americans will focus on home in 2010. “Our relationship with money has changed,” said Susan McCoy, trend spotter and outdoor living expert. “Hard work, common sense and a return to small-town values are causing a shift in priorities from boardrooms to backyards.” For growth to happen, he said, the industry needs to: Many of the closed operations were bought by others, he said. Actual growing capacity in the state to meet consumer demand decreased by 25 percent, he said.Growing responseThe total wholesale value of floriculture and nursery crops in 2009 is expected to be 2 percent less than in 2008, he said. Large businesses with sales exceeding $100,000 will likely decline the most in Georgia. These larger operations produce 80 percent of the total farm-gate value, but account for less than 25 percent of all operations. Herbaceous perennials, foliage and cut flowers suffered the biggest declines in sales. Stegelin is confident Georgia’s green industry can weather the recession storm. Get premium nursery plants and floriculture to buyers in premium markets where prices are highest. Have favorable weather conditions that lift crop yields and quality. Identify and market to offshore customers, reducing dependence on local markets. Maintain appropriate facilities and proper growing conditions for quality products. Overcome water access issues that can impact the quality of their products. In 2008 and 2009, Georgia lost one-third of its garden and landscape businesses, reports UGA agricultural economist Forrest Stegelin in the 2010 Georgia Agricultural Forecast, a collection of economic outlooks published annually by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.last_img read more

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Hitchhikers grow on diseased plants

first_imgLichens and moss are often found growing on rocks, tortoise shells, windowpanes or even plants. They are harmless, but could indicate that something is wrong with a plant or tree. Have you ever heard of the old saying “A rolling stone gathers no moss”? It’s a good analogy to describe why lichens or moss often don’t grow on young, healthy, actively growing trees. As long as an object is moving, moss or lichens can’t take hold. On the other hand, stressed trees or shrubs grow very slowly and often have moss or lichens growing on them.Not pathogensLichens and moss aren’t pathogens, meaning they don’t cause disease in plants. They use the plants as a surface to grow on. When a tree or shrub begins to decline due to some sort of environmental stress or other disorder, its leaf canopy thins and allows sunlight to enter and support lichen growth. If overall plant health is improved, a dense, vibrant leaf canopy should inhibit any sunlight available for lichen growth. Lichens are often found growing on trees planted in small islands in the middle of parking lots. These trees are stressed by limited soil and root growth, compacted soils and heat stress due to paved surfaces. Moss tends to grow on the north side of old, slow-growing trees under heavy shade. Signs of poor healthIf you see lichens or moss growing on trees or shrubs in your landscape, this is a clue that something is causing your plants to grow slowly and decline in health. This could be a combination of factors like plant competition, drought stress, root stress, over watering, soil compaction, poor nutrition, improper soil pH or improper pruning. If you remove what’s stressing your trees or shrubs, the lichens or moss will go away.last_img read more

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Ant Control

first_imgSpotting an active gardener is easy – just check for dirt under their fingernails. Small, red sores on the hands above those dirty nails mean that gardener has braved the pain and misery of fire ant bites to remove encroaching weeds from their around cherished flowers and vegetables. The red imported fire ant was introduced through the port of Mobile, Alabama, from South America in the 1930s. The stinging pest now infests more than 325 million acres from California throughout the southern U.S. and Puerto Rico. Early eradication efforts failed due to the ant’s biology and ability to rapidly reproduce. Imported fire ants disturb native habitats and home landscapes and have created an enormous impact on the U.S. economy. In fact, fire ants are estimated to have a $1.2 billion impact on the state of Texas alone.Fall is the best time to control fire ants, so start next year’s battle plan now. Fire ant colonies have been growing all summer and will have reached their peak size by the end of September. It is best to attack these colonies before cooler weather sends them deep into the ground.For fall treatment, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts recommend using a fire ant bait product. Worker ants pick up the bait and transport it back to the colony. Because the active ingredient is relatively slow to act, there is time for the material to be fed to the queen. Baits are also effective at controlling mounds that are not large enough to be seen. When using fire ant baits follow these steps:• Do not disturb the mounds or apply baits directly to the mounds.• Use a broadcast spreader and apply bait over the entire lawn.• Treat the lawn in the late afternoon when temperatures are between 60 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit.• Treat when no rain is predicted for 24 hours.• Once a bag of bait has been opened, try to use the entire product within a few days. The oil carrier can degrade over time, and the ants may not take it if the product sits out.• Follow the label on the product – it’s the law!There are a number of home remedy treatments for controlling fire ants, but it should be noted that they rarely eliminate colonies. Some of the remedies are simply old wives’ tales. Boiling water poured on an active mound can be effective, but only if enough water is poured onto the mound to fully kill all ants. This method is time intensive and potentially dangerous to the individual carrying the boiling water. Boiling or hot water can also kill or damage nearby plants, turf and non-target soil organisms. Ants are rumored to explode after eating grits due to the expansion of the dry starches. The truth is that only larval-stage ants digest solid foods; workers only feed on liquids or greasy materials.For more information on controlling fire ants, see the UGA Extension publication “Managing Imported Fire Ants in Urban Areas” at extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.cfm?number=B1191.last_img read more

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AGL 2017

first_imgAfter two years of learning about Georgia’s largest industry and developing leadership skills, the second class of the Advancing Georgia’s Leaders in Agriculture and Forestry (AGL) program has graduated.University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences faculty launched the program in 2012 to educate and empower Georgia’s agricultural and natural resource industry leaders to become effective advocates for the largest economic drivers in Georgia – the state’s agricultural and forestry industries.Twenty-five industry leaders from across the state spent the last two years touring farms and processing plants, and traveling throughout the state and world. They graduated in a ceremony at The Rock Ranch in The Rock, Georgia, on March 4.”This class represented a diverse cross section of Georgia’s agriculture and forestry industries. Each participant completed six in-state institutes, as well as an individual leadership project required for graduation,” said Lauren Griffeth, leadership specialist for UGA Cooperative Extension.Projects ranged from the launch of a communications initiative for the Georgia Farmers Market Association to the start of a servant-leadership initiative within an office. “I’m so proud of these alumni’s connection to AGL. These individuals will certainly continue to positively impact their organizations, communities and industries through their influential leadership,” Griffeth said.During their time in AGL, participants engaged in over 110 interactive sessions, completed four behavioral assessments and helped one another understand and analyze issues facing their industries and challenges that may emerge in the future.The AGL program is coordinated by faculty in the UGA CAES Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication and the Office of Learning and Organizational Development.Graduates of the 2015-2017 AGL class include:Danielle Hernandez Atkins, stewardship specialist, Georgia Forestry Commission, Brunswick, GeorgiaChris Baumann, region supervisor, Georgia Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Resources Division, Rockledge, GeorgiaMallory Black, communication and public relations manager, CNI Ag Independent Retailers, Albany, GeorgiaShane Boyer, vice president for corporate lending, AgSouth Farm Credit, Madison, GeorgiaAshley Buford, owner, Braxton Farms, Cordele, GeorgiaBecca Creasy, regional product manager, Monsanto Company, Statesboro, GeorgiaMichael Cronic, broiler manager, Columbia Farms of Georgia, Braselton, GeorgiaStan Deal, farmer and technical sales representative, Verdesian Life Sciences, Donalsonville, GeorgiaAmelia Dortch, state public affairs specialist, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, Mableton, GeorgiaKyle Hagen, service manager, Kubota Tractor Company, AtlantaMike Harrell, forester, Stuckey Timberland, Eastman, GeorgiaDavid Huddleston, purchasing manager, Carroll Electric Membership Cooperative, Roopville, GeorgiaJeff Jordan, vice president for forest technology, F&W Forestry Service, Albany, GeorgiaSamantha Kilgore, communications director, Associations Services Group, Sharpsburg, GeorgiaJeff Manley, general manager and co-founder, The Rock Ranch, The Rock, GeorgiaBrent Marable, assistant director for plant licensing, UGA Innovation Gateway, Watkinsville, GeorgiaRegina Morgan, director of communications, Peeples Industries, Savannah, GeorgiaJay Murdock, director of member services, Georgia Farm Bureau, Macon, GeorgiaLanie Riner, president and head grower, Thunderwood Farms, Woodbury, GeorgiaJenna Saxon, government relations representative, Georgia EMC, AtlantaJason Sidwell, broiler technician, Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation, and owner, Sidwell Beef, Rutledge, GeorgiaBrian Stone, appraisal services manager, Forest Resource Consultants, Macon, GeorgiaAnna Strickland, UGA Archway professional for Hart County, University of Georgia, Winterville, GeorgiaNathan Tyson, account manager, CNI Ag Independent Retailers, Tifton, GeorgiaBrennan Washington, farmer, Phoenix Gardens, Lawrenceville, GeorgiaOrganizers are now accepting nominations for the upcoming AGL class that will begin in August 2017. Those seeking more information about the AGL program can visit agl.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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