‘Fantastic’ Pako Ayestaran the perfect man to assist Brendan Rodgers at Liverpool

first_imgSpanish football expert Graham Hunter has told talkSPORT that Liverpool would be making a wise choice in bringing Pako Ayestaran back to the club.Ayestaran, who was assistant to Rafa Benitez during his time in charge at Anfield, is being linked with a return to the role under Brendan Rodgers after the departure of his long-serving number two Colin Pascoe.Speaking on the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast, Hunter said of the Spaniard: “He is a friend of mine and he is somebody I think very highly of in terms of his intensity of work, in terms of what he is able to do in mixing coaching, tactics, and fitness, which was his base specialism for elite professional football coaching.“He is a brilliant guy tactically and he understands games when he view them, whether it is changing games or viewing games in advance. If Brendan puts Paco into that set-up, a set-up that Pako loves, and he wants to come back to Anfield, they will be choosing a fantastic man and you will see the difference.“When you are talking to players on the training ground next mid-season, if Pako joins Brendan, you will hear players praising them. It is a good choice, I hope it comes off.”last_img read more

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97 new laws coming our way

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.Arguably his most controversial decision, Schwarzenegger signed a bill requiring semiautomatic handguns made and sold in the state to have technology to microstamp each bullet fired from the gun. Supporters say the micro-stamping requirement, the first in the nation, will help police track down criminals. Opponents, including the National Rifle Association, argued that the technology is unreliable and could be used to implicate innocent people if criminals leave behind stamped cartridges from other guns at crime scenes. In his signing message, Schwarzenegger said he understands the technology is not perfect but hopes it will give police a new tool in solving violent crimes. Under the gun bill, every semiautomatic handgun sold in California will have to stamp each bullet cartridge in two locations whenever it is fired. The stamp would identify the gun’s make, model and serial number. The law will take effect in 2010. LEGISLATION: Bills governor signed address teen tanning, condors, bottled water and more. By Aaron C. Davis THE ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO – Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Saturday signed 97 bills and vetoed another 58, creating new laws on topics such as the sale of kangaroo skin and protecting endangered condors, but also halting lawmakers’ efforts on dozens of other fronts, including giving college aid to illegal immigrants and requiring warning labels on cloned food. It does not affect revolvers, rifles or shotguns. It targets only semiautomatics, which the bill’s author, Assemblyman Mike Feuer, D-Los Angeles, said are used in the majority of homicides committed with firearms. Schwarzenegger’s most high- profile veto blocked the so-called Dream Act, a bill that would have made illegal immigrant students who graduate from California high schools eligible for college aid. The governor had vetoed similar legislation last year, but this year Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama drew attention to it, saying Schwarzenegger would compound the immigration problem if he vetoed it. Student groups also had rallied repeatedly on the steps of the Capitol and elsewhere around the state in recent weeks. Sen. Gil Cedillo, D-Los Angeles, wrote the bill. California already allows illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition if they’ve attended a California high school for at least three years and apply for legal status. The governor’s actions leave 153 bills remaining on his desk. He has until Sunday at midnight to sign or veto the remaining legislation. If he takes no action, the bills become law. Schwarzenegger also signed bills on the following topics: Condors: Hunters will be barred from using led-based ammunition in areas inhabited by endangered California condors, an area that encompasses most of the state’s central coast. Scientists consider lead poisoning a leading cause of death among the scavengers, which often feed on bullet-ridden carcasses. There are only about 127 condors flying freely in the southwestern United States, and about 70 are in California. More than a dozen deaths have been linked to lead poisoning. Opponents of the bill, said the alternative, copper bullets, may be no better for the birds. Kangaroo skin: California will end its unique ban on importing or selling kangaroo-skin products. Schwarzenegger favors exotic-skin cowboy boots and owns snakeskin and alligator boots, but proponents said the bill was not about fashion products. Kangaroo leather is lighter than other leathers and is most often used in law enforcement gear and high-performance soccer cleats. The measure would continue the state’s prohibition on products made from protected kangaroo species but allow the use of leather from more plentiful species. Sexual orientation: Schools will be barred from discriminating based on a student’s sexual orientation, and teachers and administrators will be required to enforce anti-bias laws to protect gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender students. Some family values groups lobbied against the bills saying they would encourage teaching about homosexuality. Sperm cleansing: Men with HIV will be allowed to donate sperm to a willing, HIV-free spouse or other recipient if the sperm has gone through a process to minimize infectiousness. Domestic violence: Victims of domestic violence will be allowed to ask judges to grant protective orders for their pets under a bill written by Sen. Sheila Kuehl, D-Santa Monica. Student voting: State colleges and universities will be required to try to boost voter participation by giving students the opportunity to register to vote when they sign up for classes. Teen tanning: Parents must consent in person to teens using tanning salons in an effort to reduce the number of children exposed to the potentially dangerous ultraviolet light. Gift certificates: Consumers can cash in unspent gift certificates worth less than $10. An estimated $8 billion in gift cards went unspent nationally in 2006. Bottled water: Bottled water will have to come with labels revealing the source of the water beginning in 2009. School food: Elementary and middle schools will have to remove food with artery-clogging trans fats from cafeteria menus and vending machines. The governor vetoed the following: Interrogations: The bill would have forced police investigators to record interrogations of suspects in homicides and violent felonies. Proponents said the measure would have eliminated disputes about what actually happened during interrogations. In his veto message, Schwarzenegger said that although reducing the number of false confessions was a laudable goal, recording every interrogation would put unnecessary restrictions on officers. “I cannot support a measure that would deny law enforcement the flexibility necessary to interrogate suspects in homicide and violent felony cases when the need to do so is not clear,” he wrote. Abandoned babies: The legislation would have given new mothers up to 30 days to anonymously drop off unwanted babies at places such as fire stations and hospitals. The current law allows such drop-offs within 72 hours of birth. It was the second consecutive year Schwarzenegger vetoed the measure and he said the law would put newborns in greater risk by keeping them in an unsafe environment longer. Identity theft: The bill would have required stores responsible for data breaches to repay banks for the cost of replacing compromised credit and debit cards.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Men’s Basketball To Face SIU On ESPNU

first_imgThe Drake University men’s basketball team returns home for its next two games beginning with Sunday’s contest against SIU. Tipoff is scheduled for 3 p.m. with the contest being broadcast on ESPNU.Sunday’s game is also the first of a doubleheader with the women’s basketball team. Following the men’s game, the women take on Illinois State at 6 p.m. In addition to the two games, it is ‘Super Hero Day’ at the Knapp Center. All youth wearing a superhero costume receive free admission to the game. Fans can meet superheroes before the game and get their pictures taken with them. The first 500 youth in attendance will receive a free set of Drake Basketball Trading Cards courtesy of Christian PrintersThe Bulldogs are aiming for their first MVC win of the season after starting the Valley season with five-straight losses to fall to 5-12 overall. SIU makes its annual trek to Des Moines with a 15-3 record and a 4-1 mark in MVC action. SIU is also 6-0 on the road this season.The Salukis are led by Anthony Beane’s 20.2 points per game, the second highest average in the MVC. Meanwhile, Drake’s is led by Reed Timmer’s 17.1 points per game after a 19-point showing in Tuesday’s loss at Evansville.Timmer will be aiming to recapture some of the magic he enjoyed against the Salukis as a freshman. In the last meeting between the two teams, he scored a then career-high 25 points on 9-fo-16 shooting. Previously he scored 19 points against SIU. In those two games he is averaging 22.0 points, shooting 51.9 percent from the field and 55.6 percent from three-point range against SIU.Drake currently ranks 10th nationally in three-point percentage at 41.2 percent. However, the Bulldogs have shot 35.4 percent in their four MVC games to date while SIU ranks third n the MVC in three-point percentage defense at 32.3 percent.The Bulldogs have shot 40 percent or better from the arc in 11 of their 17 games this season and over the last three seasons the team is 7-27 when failing to shoot 40 percent or better from the arc. Three Bulldogs – Reed Timmer (.473), Graham Woodward (.402) and Kale Abrahamson (.400) – rank in the top 11 in the MVC in three-point percentage.Timmer and Abrahamson also rank in the top 10 in the MVC in scoring at 17.1 and 14.4 points per game, respectively.Following Sunday’s game, the Bulldogs remain home to host Missouri State on Wednesday, Jan. 20 in the Knapp Center. Tipoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Mediacom MC22 and The Valley on ESPN3.  Wednesday will also be a ‘Half-Price Wednesday’ with  half-price general admission tickets available the day of the game.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Simbwaless URA host Vipers in SUPL

first_img Tags: sam simbwaStarTimes Uganda Premeir LeaguetopURA FCvipers sc Sam Simbwa was banned for 4 games on Wednesday (file photo)StarTimes Uganda Premier LeagueURA FC-SC VIPERS SCMandela National Stadium- Namboole@4pm.NAMBOOLE – URA FC host Kitende based Club Vipers at Namboole as the StarTimes Uganda Premier League continues.The Tax Collectors are without head coach Sam Ssimbwa who was banned for 4 games after making tribalist comments during a post-match brief in Jinja after his side was held by Kirinya-Jinja SS in a league game.This is going to be Vipers first match following elimination from the Caf Confederation Cup at the hands of CS Sfaxien of Tunisia.In their last league encounters, Vipers defeated Onduparaka 3-0 at Kitende while URA lost to KCCA at home in Namboole.What the coaches say:Micheal Ouma (Vipers).“It will not going be an easy game for us but we are going to play and fight for victory to keep the title chase realistic.Team news. Yayo Lutimba and Innocent Wafula will most probably be in the starting lineup after missing the CAF encounter.Rahmat Senfuka, Tom Masiko and Brian Nkuubi are all available for selection if the coach decides to make changes in his midfield as he looks to avoid a burnout since second round takes off immediately without a rest for the lads.The hosts are without first choice goalie Alitho James who sustained an injury and Vitalis Tabu who recently underwent a stomach surgery.Bbosa Lutalo will lead the technical bench following the suspension of head coach Sam Simbwa.Match Facts:The two clubs are meeting for the 27th time in the league history since Vipers joined the top flight division.In the previous 26 meetings, Vipers has won 5, drawn 10 and lost 11 times scoring 25 goals conceding 33 in the process.Coach Micheal Nam Ouma will be leading the venoms for the third time since he took charge.The Venoms lie in second position at 29 points out of 13 matches while URA occupies 6th place with 21 points from 14 games.It should also be noted that Sam Ssimbwa as a coach has never beaten Vipers in a competitive match at any of the clubs he has managed in his entire career therefore he will be seeking his first ever win over the Venoms.Comments last_img read more

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She Cranes defeat Scotland to register second victory at Netball World Cup 2019

first_img Tags: Gail ParataLilian AjioMary NubaNetball World cup 2019Peace ProscoviaRacheal Nanyongashe cranesStella NanfukaStella OyellaSylvia Nanyongatop Both Uganda and Scotland qualified for the next round. (PHOTOS/Courtesy)Netball World CupUganda 52-43 ScotlandM&S Bank Arena, Liverpool Sunday, 14-07-2019The She Cranes ensured they reached the final preliminary round of the Netball world cup, defeating Scotland 52-43 on Sunday.Scotland ranked one place behind Uganda in 7th, finished third in Group D to also advanced to the next round, in third.On the day, Stella Oyala was magnificent and her shooting could not be contained by Scotland.The home based player converted 27 of her attempted 28 goals, shooting 96%.Despite the loss, Scotland coach Gail Parata was impressed by her side.“The last time we played it was a 20-goal difference,” Said Parata told BBC after the game.“Today’s it’s nine, so we’re building. You can see how young our players are – most will be there for the next World Cup.”Uganda and Scotland went into the match with identical records – a win over Samoa and a defeat by England – making this a straight shootout for second place in the group.The teams traded goals in the opening 10 minutes before Oyella and inspirational captain Peace Proscovia moved Uganda into a 16-11 lead at the end of the opening quarter.Emma Barrie, at 17 the youngest in the Scotland squad, came on for Bethan Goodwin and scored seven goals from nine attempts.But that was not enough to prevent Uganda from extending their advantage to eight goals by half-time – 29-21 the score – their eye for the net matched by their ability to intercept Scotland’s passes.The second half was more of Uganda trying to see out the victory as Scotland desperately tried to come back.Scotland took the third 12-11 while Uganda took the fourth 12-10.In the end, Uganda held on to win the contest and justify their favourite tag that they went into the game, holding.However, the result confirmed that Samoa would finish bottom of the table while Scotland and Uganda would go through to contest the second stage of the preliminaries starting on Monday.Uganda’s starting 7 against ScotlandSylvia Nanyonga, Stella Oyella, Mary Nuba, Peace Proscovia, Stella Nanfuka, Racheal Nanyonga, Lilian Ajio.Comments last_img read more

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Don’t fret the draft pick — here’s why the 49ers’ win is worth celebrating

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or video on a mobile deviceSANTA CLARA — Niners fans have been looking towards the NFL Draft since Jimmy Garoppolo tore his ACL in September. It’s understandable: In this lost season, the reward of a high draft pick can make losing tolerable.But that doesn’t mean that winning shouldn’t be celebrated. The 49ers beat the Seahawks for the first time since 2013 Sunday, with Robbie Gould’s 36-yard field goal in overtime deciding …last_img read more

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Natural Selection Demonstrated in European Heart-Disease Gene?

first_imgStephen Wooding (U. of Utah) is elated.  He sees an “exciting trend” in genetic research that might, finally, demonstrate positive natural selection acting on a gene with a clear phenotypic effect (measurable outward benefit).  Writing in the Sept. 7 Current Biology,1 he mentions a few recent papers suggesting this connection, but focuses particularly on one study by Rockman et al. in the same issue.2  This UK/American team claims to have identified a gene that has been positively selected to shape heart disease risk among Europeans.  The story was summarized by EurekAlert.    The gene under investigation is named MMP3, a regulator of a substance that builds coronary artery walls.  The amount of up- or down-regulation of this gene affects their elasticity and thickness.  The researchers compared this gene and its surrounding DNA between nine kinds of monkeys and apes, and between six human populations.  They claim to have found a trend among Europeans to possess a certain mutation that up-regulates the products of MMP3 (because it inhibits repressive factors).  This leads to less hardening of the arteries but more risk of blood clot induced heart attack or stroke (myocardial infarction).  The mutation changes one T to a C at a certain position on the gene.  Using molecular phylogenetic techniques, they estimated the mutation might have occurred in the European line anywhere from 36,600 to 2,200 years ago.  Maybe it came about in the Ice Age, they surmise, and natural selection acting on this mutation may have given Europeans dining on animal fat some protection from atherosclerosis.  Whatever, the selection probably did not act alone on that one gene, which only regulates other genes, but on a suite of genes due to pleiotropic effects (i.e., when one gene evolves, other unrelated phenotypic effects can result).    The authors seemed happy to be able to provide an example of natural selection acting positively on a gene for a beneficial physiological effect: “The evolutionary forces of mutation, natural selection, and genetic drift shape the pattern of phenotypic variation in nature, but the roles of these forces in defining the distributions of particular traits have been hard to disentangle.”  (Emphasis added in all quotes.) Natural selection is an important factor influencing variation in the human genome, but most genetic studies of natural selection have focused on variants with unknown phenotypic associations.  This trend is changing.  New studies are rapidly revealing the effects of natural selection on genetic variants of known or likely functional importance….These [studies on] variants [on genes with known phenotypic effects] are particularly interesting from an evolutionary standpoint because they are where the phenotypic rubber meets the road of natural selection – variants upon which natural selection could be having particularly direct effects.Those assuming this was old news since Darwin’s day might be surprised at this admission that studies have rarely connected a mutation to an actual physical benefit.  Analyses at the molecular level of the gene, to be fair, have only recently become possible.  Stephen Wooding is greatly encouraged by this study.  He thinks it represents not only an exciting trend, but a new means of paving “an unusually direct path between ancient human history and modern human health.”  Rockman’s team claims that British men would have 43% more heart attacks had this mutation not occurred among their distant ancestors.  But then, since hardening of the arteries seems to be a recent malady among humans, he admitted that maybe the natural selection at the time was for something else “and the heart disease effect was incidental.”    One other benefit Rockman claims for this study is that it shows natural selection can act not only on the genes the make proteins, but on the genes that regulate other genes– a factor he claims “traditional evolutionary biology has all but ignored.”  Considering the evolution of regulatory factors extends natural selection theory to the level of the “wiring diagram,” he says.  No longer should we just consider good genes and bad genes.  “Rather, there is a complex set of interactions” such that certain combinations might be best in one environment, others better in another.  “So we’re advocating a more nuanced view of how we view the genetic bases of disease,” he said in the press release from Duke University.1Stephen Wooding, “Natural Selection: Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign,” Current Biology, Volume 14, Issue 17, 7 September 2004, Pages R700-R701, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2004.08.041.2Rockman et al., “Positive Selection on MMP3 Regulation Has Shaped Heart Disease Risk,” Current Biology, Volume 14, Issue 17, 7 September 2004, Pages 1531-1539, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2004.08.051.Remember the old moron jokes?  “How do you keep a moron busy for an hour?  Put him in a round room and tell him there’s a penny in the corner.”  It doesn’t take much to amuse Darwinists.  Tell them there’s a hint of natural selection in the human genome, and it is incredible the amount of work they will do to find it.  You can bet any claims will be ambiguous, hazy, uncertain, questionable and open to different interpretations, but if they can be offered in homage to buddha Charlie, it’s worth it to them to run in logical circles and keep up the candles of hope burning.  (For another example, look at this story on EurekAlert, about Penn State scientists “hunting illusive signs of natural selection” between Europeans and Africans, and finding only ambiguous signs of differing susceptibility to disease or milk intolerance.)    What did these guys find, really?  One single-nucleotide polymorphism in just one gene out of hundreds that regulate heart health.  Sure, tweaking the regulation of this gene might put a person at risk for hardening of the arteries, but is Darwinian evolution the only explanation?  The Europeans could have descended from a clan whose grandpappy had the mutation at the Tower of Babel, for that matter; how could they prove otherwise?  The monkeys they studied had very different polymorphisms of these genes, and you don’t see them all keeling over from heart attacks.  If natural selection acted on this gene, why didn’t it act on Siberians or Eskimos or Australians or others at similar latitudes?  Did this mutation lead to a new organ or function or add to the genetic information?  No, it only tweaked the existing information.  And some evolution!  Pick your poison: increased risk of atherosclerosis, or increased risk of myocardial infarction.  Is this one of the finest examples they can find of the miracle-working mechanism of natural selection, the discovery that made Chairman Charlie famous, so powerful that during the same period of time it turned monkeys swinging from trees into humans writing books?    The line about Ice Age men benefiting from the mutation because of their mammal-fat diet is comical.  How could that help the population genetics, if the individuals most likely got their heart attacks after having children?  The error bars on their dates are huge, even if one were to swallow the highly questionable phylogenetic techniques they used, and the evolution-based assumptions about mutation rates.  A chain of reasoning is only as strong as its weakest link: e.g., “if there was water on Mars, there might have been life, therefore there might have been intelligent life, therefore there might have been lawyers.”  Evolutionists get away with stacked assumptions only because they have ruled out anything other than naturalistic explanations.  Since the only contender is something akin to Darwinism, it’s the best they can offer (see Best-in-Field Fallacy).    Why are we the only ones questioning the Darwinist spin on this paper, and asking the hard questions while the other science outlets mindlessly inherit the wind and parrot the spin with lines like “Heart gene yields insights into evolution”?  Why not consider the obvious, that a functioning circulatory system is a tremendous example of interrelated, functional design?  The diagnosis is simple.  It is that ancient human malady, hardness of heart.(Visited 133 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Milk and nutrition

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The erosion of milk’s reputation as a healthy food choice is the biggest issue facing the nation’s dairy industry, said the new dairy chair for The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.“We could survive longer on milk without food, without water, without pizza, than you can survive on anything else,” said Rafael Jimenez-Flores, who joined the college as the J.T. “Stubby” Parker Endowed Chair in Dairy Foods earlier this year.Jimenez-Flores has made it his mission to demonstrate scientifically the nutritional benefits of milk in the face of “fear mongering” that may have led to some public misconceptions that it is not good for you. “It is unethical to use fear for profit when we are trying to feed the world,” he said.Calling milk “the only food that has evolved with us,” Jimenez-Flores points out that the lactose in milk favors positive gut bacteria, which aid digestion.In addition, the milk fat globule membrane has been shown to help prevent obesity and cancer as well as to enhance brain development, Jimenez-Flores said.Ohio’s dairy industry has a strong reputation for processing in a manner that allows waste to be used as raw materials, adding value to dairy by products, he said.Among his current research initiatives is an examination of the “fresh milk” concept in Australia, where unpasteurized milk is being sold to consumers. Rather than using heat to kill harmful bacteria, the process requires a high-pressure treatment, Jimenez-Flores said. He is working on a proposal to investigate high-pressure homogenization as well.While the research is interesting and important, Jimenez-Flores considers his first priority as dairy chair to teach college students to solve problems. He plans to accomplish this by sharing his enthusiasm and love for his discipline.“What the industry really needs are Ohio State graduates who can work and succeed,” he said. “Future graduates coming from my program will be unquestionably well prepared. These were values given to me by my professors, for which I am forever indebted.”When he was an undergraduate student himself in Mexico, Jimenez-Flores studied chemical engineering and pharmaceutical chemistry at the Universidad La Salle, A.C.He went on to Cornell University where he earned his MS in food science. Then he received his PhD in agricultural chemistry and food science from the University of California, Davis.Prior to coming to Ohio State, Jimenez-Flores worked as a professor at California Polytechnic State University for 21 years, spending the last three as director of the Center for Applications in Biotechnology there.He had always wanted to be an endowed chair, and when the opportunity arose at Ohio State, Jimenez-Flores was already aware of the department’s reputation, especially that of the late Jim Harper, who held the position from 1993 to 2013.“It’s like an unreal thing to come here. Ohio State has tons of talent everywhere, not only in agriculture,” he said. “I want to help the dairy industry by attracting talent to work in and help develop dairy science.”last_img read more

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Why Upgrading to V-Log Is Worth the Money for GH4 Users

first_imgPanasonic recently announced the long-awaited V-Log picture profile for their GH4. The cost to upgrade is $99. Here’s why it’s worth it.When Panasonic first teased customers with the prospect of V-Log, the response was overwhelming. It quickly became very clear that GH4 owners desperately wanted the ability to shoot in a Log color space, and for the last year or so, many users have been eagerly anticipating the release.As of last week, V-Log was finally officially announced — but the announcement came with a catch: the upgrade wouldn’t be free and would cost current users $99 to upgrade. While some GH4 owners were upset by this, I personally understand the upgrade pricing. It’s not the first time a camera manufacturer has charged for a firmware update, and while the $99 isn’t cheap, it isn’t outrageous either. In my opinion, the upgrade is well worth our money for these three reasons:1. Added Dynamic RangeWith V-Log enabled, you’re now able to capture twelve stops of dynamic range with the GH4, which is about two stops more than any other picture profile — and those 2 stops will go a very long way. Under certain circumstances it may mean that you need less lighting and/or grip gear, and the upgrade could potentially pay for itself on your first shoot.This video shows us the cinematic potential of the new V-Log format:2. More Flexibility in PostFor anyone out there like myself, who enjoys color grading — this update is for you. Not only will your images have more dynamic range, but you’ll have a far greater ability to grade the images in the editing room. If you’ve ever color corrected log footage, you know how much more freeing it can be when compared to working in a Rec 709 color space.3. LUT IntegrationOver the years, many LUTs (Look Up Tables) have been created for log footage, and now they’ll all be compatible with your GH4 footage. You could theoretically use an ARRI ALEXA LUT (or any other LUT designed for Log) with your GH4 footage and get some very instant results that may not need a whole lot of tweaking. Not to mention, one of the biggest issues with the GH4 in the past (for me at least) has been skin tones. The combination of Log and the right LUT will help with that immensely.There are also a lot of really good free LUT resources online. This article from Johnny Elwyn shares a few links to a few free resources.Pricing and AvailabilityThe new V-Log update for the Panasonic GH4 will cost $99.99 and be available mid-September.Are you excited about the new v-log format in the GH4? Share your thoughts in the comments below.last_img read more

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School buses cancelled in Dawson Creek

first_imgDAWSON CREEK, B.C. – School buses in Dawson Creek have been cancelled.Buses will not be running in School District 59 near Dawson Creek due to the extreme cold.  Buses are still running in Chetwynd.  Schools are still open in the South Peace.In School District 60 today is a non-instructional day.last_img

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