Five police officers arrested over alleged extrajudicial killing

According to Thushara Sampath (20), the eldest son of the deceased, Chandrasiri, a father of 3 children left home at 4.45 a.m. on that day to proceed to his place of business Thalpitiya in Wadduwa. Chandrasiri was a fish trader by profession.Later Sampath learned from his friend that his father had been arrested by a team of police officers at around 5 a.m. at the Thalpitiya Junction and brought to the Wadduwa Police Station. Immediately upon hearing the news Sampath went to the police station where he found his father lying on the floor of a cell. Chandrasiri was a key witness in a case filed against the Officer-in-Charge (OIC) of the Wadduwa Police Station where the petitioner, the owner of a hotel in the same area, states that his fundamental rights were violated by the OIC and other police officers. Five police officers, including an Officer in Charge (OIC) were arrested today over the death of a suspect in police custody in April 2012.Nimal Chandrasiri Dahanayke (42), a fisherman of Thalpitiya, Wadduwa, died while in the custody of the Wadduwa Police. When he approached the bars of the cell, his father was able to recognise him and Sampath could see that he was in great pain. He further observed that his father was bleeding from the injuries on his face and pleaded with the police officers on duty to provide some water for his father. However, the officers ignored his request. Sampath then rushed to home and informed his mother and took her to the police station. On their arrival, a police officer told them that Chandrasiri had been admitted to the Panadura Base Hospital.They went to the base hospital and learned from the hospital staff that the officers had handed over the body to the mortuary indicating that he was pronounced dead on arrival. (Colombo Gazette) According to the information that the Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) had received at the time, Chandrasiri Dasanayaka of Thalpitiya, Wadduwa was illegally arrested by the police officers attached to the Wadduwa Police Station and later extrajudicially killed inside the station on 15 April 2012. read more

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Politicization of migrant crisis in Hungary making them scapegoats independent UN human

#Hungary: We are alarmed by reports that #migrants in detention centres have been deliberately deprived of #food in contravention of international laws and standards.Read 👉 https://t.co/qHsKlDF3qi pic.twitter.com/kiTW5sGZRN— UN Human Rights (@UNHumanRights) May 3, 2019 “Migrants are portrayed as dangerous enemies in both official and public discourses in this country,” said Felipe González Morales, the Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants, in a statement released following the end of his official visit to Hungary.  He stressed that he had seen groups of “desperate, traumatised and helpless men, women, boys and girls confined behind razor wire fence in the transit zones.”  Mr. González Morales said that following a massive influx of migrants in 2015, anti-migration discourse in Hungary had become pervasive in both official and public spheres. Government-run campaigns had associated migrants with security threats, including terrorism, he added.  Frustrated and desperate asylum seekers in the transit zones  The independent expert especially voiced concern over asylum procedure and the transit zones.  He said that Hungary had played up a “crisis situation due to mass immigration” in parts of the country in September 2015 and later expanded the scope of it nationwide in March 2016; a situation which still prevails today. “I strongly recommend Hungary to re-evaluate its current reality in relation to migration, terminate immediately the so-called “crisis situation” and lift relevant restrictive measures,” said Mr. González Morales. The Special Rapporteur pointed out that the severe restrictions on the free movement of asylum seekers, as well as a prison-like environment in transit zones, “qualify as detention, in nature.”  He also urged Hungary to end the administrative detention of children, underscoring that “detention is never in the best interests of the child.”  He said his main mission had been to evaluate existing laws, policies, and practices in migration governance and their impact on the human rights of migrants, including migrant workers and asylum seekers. Special Rapporteurs are appointed by the Geneva-based UN Human Rights Council to examine and report back on a specific human rights theme or a country situation. The positions are honorary and the experts are not UN staff, nor are they paid for their work. read more

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