Champions Savannah held in opener

first_imgWESTERN BUREAU: The 2015-16 Charley’s JB Rum Western Confederation Super League season got cracking on the weekend with six matches, including a less-than-auspicious start for defending champions Savannah Sports Club, who were held to a scoreless draw by Lucea FC at Frome Sports Complex on Sunday. This year’s staging has the 12 teams aligned in two groups of six based on how they ended the last campaign, with Savannah, Granville, Montego Bay Boys and Girls’ Club (MBBGC), Salt Marsh, Petersfield, and Lucea in Group One. Group Two comprises Wadadah, Sandals Whitehouse, Beaches Negril, Village United, newcomers Reggae Youths and Clarks Town, the St James and Trelawny champions, respectively. Another new development of note is that Livingston Berley has taken the hot seat as coach of the defending champions. RONIEL WHYTE ON TARGET While his team failed to shine against Lucea, Roniel Whyte was on target in the 19th and 36th minutes in leading Petersfield FC to a 2-0 victory over Montego Bay Boys and Girls’ Club. Former St James Premier League kingpins, Wadadah FC, were also in the winners’ corner as forward Javier Peak struck twice in Saturday’s 3-1 win over newly promoted Clarks Town of Trelawny. Ajai Black also found the net in that match for Wadadah, while Dwayne Brown netted the consolation for Clarks Town. Also on Saturday, Reggae Youths and Beaches Negril ended 1-1, with Oshane Russell getting a late equaliser for Reggae Youths in the 81st minute to cancel out Ashley Forrest’s 18th-minute strike. In another game on Saturday, Salt Marsh edged Granville 1-0 as Marvin Reynolds scored in the 20th minute to give them three points and a share of the early lead in Group One with Petersfield. Wadadah are early leaders in Group Two on three points. The league continues on Sunday with four matches, the pick of which should be the Granville-Petersfield FC clash, starting 3 p.m. at Granville Community Centre.last_img read more

Continue reading

LUH records fifth highest number of women waiting to see a gynaecologist

first_imgIreland’s consultant crisis is having a ‘serious effect’ on delivery of women’s healthcare as 1,783 women are currently waiting for an appointment with a gynaecologist at Letterkenny University Hospital.There has been a 40% increase nationally in the number of women waiting to see a gynaecologist in five years.Currently, there are 28,417 women waiting for an appointment across Ireland’s public hospitals, of these, 5,394 are waiting more than a year. Letterkenny University Hospital has the fifth highest number of women waiting on appointments.The hospitals with the longest wait times to see a gynaecologist are in Dublin, while Galway, Letterkenny and Limerick had the highest regional figures.In addition, almost one in five (5,394) women are waiting longer than 12 months to secure an appointment.The Irish Hospital Consultants Association says that the consultant retention and recruitment crisis is having a ‘serious effect’ on the delivery of healthcare to women across Ireland. The group says that one-in-five or over 500 of all permanent consultant posts nationally are now empty or only temporarily filled, resulting in patients waiting long periods to access essential healthcare services.They say that consultant salary cuts are driving specialists abroad and new consultants are being paid up to 51% less than their colleagues.As part of their #CARECANTWAIT campaign, the IHCA says that it is time for the Government to restore pay parity for new consultants.LUH records fifth highest number of women waiting to see a gynaecologist was last modified: August 21st, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Continue reading

Chelsea v West Ham line-ups: Terry back in three Chelsea changes, Hammers striker returns

first_imgJohn Terry makes his first Chelsea start in five weeks as one of three changes to the line-up that lost at Everton last week.Terry’s return means Branislav Ivanovic reverts to right-back and Cesar Azpilicueta switches back to left-back, with Kenedy pushed into a more advanced role.With Diego Costa suspended, Loic Remy gets the nod up front for his first home league start of the season.Oscar comes in to midfield as Nemanja Matic and Pedro drop out.West Ham also make three changes, after the 1-1 draw at Manchester United last time out.Adrian returns in goal, after Darren Randolph played in the FA Cup, while Emmanuel Emenike and Andy Carroll drop to the bench.Enner Valencia starts a league game for the first time since 13 February, while Diafra Sakho plays up front.Chelsea: Courtois; Ivanovic, Cahill, Terry,Azpilicueta; Mikel, Fabregas; Willian, Oscar, Kenedy; Remy. Subs: Begovic, Baba, Matic, Loftus-Cheek, Pedro, Traore, Pato.West Ham United: Adrian; Antonio, Reid, Ogbonna, Cresswell; Kouyate, Noble; Lanzini, Payet, Valencia; Sakho.Subs: Randolph, Oxford, O’Brien, Obiang, Song, Emenike, Carroll.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Continue reading

Milk and nutrition

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The erosion of milk’s reputation as a healthy food choice is the biggest issue facing the nation’s dairy industry, said the new dairy chair for The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.“We could survive longer on milk without food, without water, without pizza, than you can survive on anything else,” said Rafael Jimenez-Flores, who joined the college as the J.T. “Stubby” Parker Endowed Chair in Dairy Foods earlier this year.Jimenez-Flores has made it his mission to demonstrate scientifically the nutritional benefits of milk in the face of “fear mongering” that may have led to some public misconceptions that it is not good for you. “It is unethical to use fear for profit when we are trying to feed the world,” he said.Calling milk “the only food that has evolved with us,” Jimenez-Flores points out that the lactose in milk favors positive gut bacteria, which aid digestion.In addition, the milk fat globule membrane has been shown to help prevent obesity and cancer as well as to enhance brain development, Jimenez-Flores said.Ohio’s dairy industry has a strong reputation for processing in a manner that allows waste to be used as raw materials, adding value to dairy by products, he said.Among his current research initiatives is an examination of the “fresh milk” concept in Australia, where unpasteurized milk is being sold to consumers. Rather than using heat to kill harmful bacteria, the process requires a high-pressure treatment, Jimenez-Flores said. He is working on a proposal to investigate high-pressure homogenization as well.While the research is interesting and important, Jimenez-Flores considers his first priority as dairy chair to teach college students to solve problems. He plans to accomplish this by sharing his enthusiasm and love for his discipline.“What the industry really needs are Ohio State graduates who can work and succeed,” he said. “Future graduates coming from my program will be unquestionably well prepared. These were values given to me by my professors, for which I am forever indebted.”When he was an undergraduate student himself in Mexico, Jimenez-Flores studied chemical engineering and pharmaceutical chemistry at the Universidad La Salle, A.C.He went on to Cornell University where he earned his MS in food science. Then he received his PhD in agricultural chemistry and food science from the University of California, Davis.Prior to coming to Ohio State, Jimenez-Flores worked as a professor at California Polytechnic State University for 21 years, spending the last three as director of the Center for Applications in Biotechnology there.He had always wanted to be an endowed chair, and when the opportunity arose at Ohio State, Jimenez-Flores was already aware of the department’s reputation, especially that of the late Jim Harper, who held the position from 1993 to 2013.“It’s like an unreal thing to come here. Ohio State has tons of talent everywhere, not only in agriculture,” he said. “I want to help the dairy industry by attracting talent to work in and help develop dairy science.”last_img read more

Continue reading

Journaling for Renewal

first_imgReferences:CDC. (2017). Journaling for your health.Emmons, R. A., & McCullough, M. E. (2003). Counting blessings versus burdens: An experimental investigation of gratitude and subjective well-being in daily life. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84(2), 377-389.Gratitude Journal. (2018). Greater Good in Action. UC. Berkeley.Hiemstra, R. (2001). Uses and benefits of journal writing.Harrist, S., Carlozzi, B.L., McGovern,A.R. &Harrist, A.W. (2007). Journal of Research in Personality, 41 (4), 923-930.L.M. English & M.A. Gillen, (Eds.), (2001). Promoting journal writing in adult education (New Directions for Adult and continuing Education, No. 90, pp. 19-26). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Written by MFLN Military Caregiving concentration team member: Alicia Cassels, MA, Military Families Learning Network Program Development and Evaluation SpecialistAbout eight years ago, I found one of my childhood journals, created when I was about 11 or 12 years old, it had been packed away for decades. Although I had no active memory of writing the words, vivid memories of my childhood self, long lost friends and emotions flooded back as I read. Time melted away. Although I have been teaching and writing about journaling for two decades, I have kept a personal journal nearly twice that long. Over the years, journaling has served as my method for renewal, tool for reflection, vehicle for self-expression, space for goal setting, and canvas for dreaming. Until I began reading my childhood words, I hadn’t realized that journaling would also serve as a valuable keepsake and powerful archive of my life events. Write what must not be forgotten. -Isabel AllendeI am inspired by the words of Isabel Allende, Chilean writer, member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, recipient of Chile’s National Literature Prize, and the 2014 American Presidential Medal of Freedom. As I reflect on my own experiences with journaling and those that my students and clients have shared in class and clinical settings over the years, I remain amazed that so much can be accomplished through picking up a pen.What Do You Want to Remember?As you think about the potential of journaling to enrich your life, consider three questions.What do you want to remember?What do you want to achieve?What do you want to document?Body, Mind and SpiritJournaling provides an effective method for renewal. According to the CDC, regular journaling may help identify causes of stress and help determine whether a concern is part of a pattern or an isolated issue, while also helping point the way toward a solution. Research shows that journaling may help:Increase feelings of gratitude and well-beingProvide greater understanding of personal challenges and strengthsClarify thoughts and feelingsImprove sleepAchieve weight loss goalsIdentify strengthsManage information overloadAlthough basic journaling allows for reflection on daily thoughts and activities, there are many types of specialized journals. Special-purpose journals can be helpful for those wishing to achieve weight loss and wellness goals. Gratitude journaling has been shown to improve mood, optimism, and sleep.Five Basic Steps to Help You Get Started:Select a place where you will be able to sit comfortably for at least 15 minutes. Most people prefer that this be a quiet, private place with little interruption.Select a pen and paper or use electronic means to record your thoughts.You may want to try to spend at least 10 minutes writing, allowing your mind time to reflect.Remember to keep your journal entries in a private, password-protected location. Entries on paper may be shredded if you have concerns about privacy.Don’t like blank pages? Try these conversations starters.Today I am grateful for…My favorite time of day is…My description of a perfect day would be…A personal or professional goal that I have been thinking about lately is…last_img read more

Continue reading

‘Guru Purab celebrations turned into a political drama by Akalis’

first_imgPunjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh on Thursday hit out at the Shiromani Akali Dal for politicising the occasion of the 550th birth anniversary of Guru Nanak Dev and accused it of obstructing the joint celebrations of the event.Capt. Amarinder, who reviewed the arrangements for the commemorative events at Sultanpur Lodhi and Dera Baba Nanak, said: “The occasion is one of pride, which my government wanted to celebrate collectively, rising above petty political considerations. However, the Shiromani Akali Dal scuttled all attempts of the State government to ensure joint celebrations. It’s sheer pettiness on the part of the Akalis, particularly Union Minister Harsimrat Kaur Badal.”Pointing out that his government had spent ₹550 crore to celebrate the event, the Chief Minister said the entire occasion had been transformed into a political drama by the Akalis, backed by their ally, the Bharatiya Janata Party.On the denial of visa to his Cabinet colleagues and other Punjab representatives to visit Gurdwara Nankana Sahib in Pakistan, the Chief Minister termed it extremely unfortunate. Capt. Amarinder also reiterated his protest against Islamabad’s refusal to withdraw the $20 fee on pilgrims visiting Kartarpur Gurdwara via the corridor.‘Be large-hearted’ He urged the Imran Khan-led government to be large-hearted, keeping in view the Sikh sentiments. Asked if the State government was ready to pay the amount on behalf of the pilgrims, the Chief Minister said he was, in principle, against giving anything to Pakistan on this count.last_img read more

Continue reading